Title:
Floating modular breakwater
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A floating breakwater assembly comprising an array of elongate rods articulated to one another for extending at a substantial vertical position at least partially submersed in water, wherein the rods are made of a flexible material and where the array is elastically deformable into an arcuate shape by bending the array.



Inventors:
Steinberg, Dov (Kazir, IL)
Application Number:
10/661781
Publication Date:
03/17/2005
Filing Date:
09/15/2003
Assignee:
STEINBERG DOV
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
405/28
International Classes:
E02B3/06; E02B3/20; E02B15/04; (IPC1-7): E02B3/06; E02B3/08
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20100014920TURBINE STRUCTURE AND GATE STRUCTURE HAVING FLEXIBLE JOINT AND INSIDE STUFFING FOR TIDAL POWER PLANTJanuary, 2010Jang et al.
20050058514Multi-panel seawall segmentMarch, 2005Moreau
20030021638Vibration rammer fuel tankJanuary, 2003Levine
20010002970Device for treating the soil in the vicinity of buried structuresJune, 2001Pizzorni et al.
20090297274Connection ArrangementDecember, 2009Cafaro et al.
20040141815Fiber re-enforcement of joints and corners of composite sheet piling segmentsJuly, 2004Moreau
20080205988Flood Protection WallAugust, 2008Barich et al.
20090202305ANCHORING COLLARAugust, 2009Bastard et al.
20060034668Winch gate for protection barrier systemFebruary, 2006Knezek et al.
20020028111Apparatus for laying underground electric cablesMarch, 2002Magnani et al.
20080193225Equipment and method for constructing micropiles in soil, in particular for the anchorage of active anchorsAugust, 2008Melegari



Primary Examiner:
LAGMAN, FREDERICK LYNDON
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
NATH, GOLDBERG & MEYER (Joshua Goldberg 112 South West Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314, US)
Claims:
1. A floating breakwater assembly comprising an array of elongate rods articulated to one another to allow the assembly to extend at a substantially vertical position above the water level while said rods being at least partially submersed in water, wherein said rods are made of an elastic material, the arrangement being such that upon applying bending force to the array it is elastically deformable into an open formation defined by a border line of arcuate shape.

2. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein the rods are fixedly articulated to one another and are parallelly maintained.

3. A floating breakwater according to claim 2, wherein the rods are articulated to one another by a rigid connecting element receiving the rods with their longitudinal axes extending coplanar.

4. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein one or more upper rods have buoyant properties for floating at least an upper portion of the array to emerge from the water.

5. A floating breakwater according to claim 4, wherein the upper rods are filled with foamed material.

6. A floating breakwater according to claim 4, wherein non-buoyant rods are suited for containing water.

7. A floating breakwater according to claim 4, wherein non-buoyant rods are hollow.

8. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein at least one end of the array is anchored.

9. A floating breakwater according to claim 8, wherein the at least one anchored end reduces vertical vector of force acting on the array,

10. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein at least one end of the array is articulated to a buoy which in turn is anchored.

11. A floating breakwater according to claim 10, wherein the at least one end of the array is articulated to the buoy via a connecting element.

12. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein the rods are deformed into an arced shape by a tension cable coupling two opposed ends of the array.

13. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein the rods are elastically bowed by ends of the rods being tensioned along a tandem of the bow.

14. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein the rods are elastically deformed into a bowed shape,

15. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein the array is stabilized at an substantially upright floating position by a load of weight associated with a lower end thereof.

16. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein a deck is fitted on an upper portion of the array of rods.

17. A floating breakwater according to claim 16, wherein the deck comprises floatable elements.

18. A floating breakwater according to claim 16, wherein the deck comprises a plurality of T-like elements, each comprising a substantially flat surface extending above water level, and a rod engaging portion for engaging with several parallel rods.

19. A floating breakwater according to claim 18, wherein the rod engaging portion is a rigid portion formed with rod receiving apertures.

20. A floating breakwater according to claim 16, wherein the deck is integral with one or more of upper rods of the array.

21. A floating breakwater according to claim 3, wherein the connecting element comprises a plurality of coplanar rod-receptacles, said receptacles retaining the rods at a fixed position with respect to one another.

22. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein the rods have a tubular cross section.

23. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein each rod comprises a plurality of coaxially extending successive rod segments where adjoining ends of successive rod segments are coupled to one another by a coupling element.

24. A floating breakwater according to claim 23, wherein a coupling element is used to couple adjoining ends of rod segments of two or more rods.

25. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein a first end of the array is fixedly anchored to a land portion and a second end thereof is anchored at open waters.

26. A floating breakwater according to claim 25, wherein the second end is displaceable to control span and bowing of the array.

27. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein ends of the array are tensionally attached to a marine vessel at open waters, whereby the vessel radially extends with respect to the rods at their bowed position.

28. A floating breakwater according to claim 27, wherein the marine vessel serves as an anchor for the array and where the array concavely extends opposite blowing wind.

29. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein the array is bowed so as to concavely extend opposite blowing wind, wherein an attenuated wave zone is formed.

30. A floating breakwater according to claim 29, wherein mooring arrangements are provided within the bowed array.

31. A floating breakwater according to claim 30, comprising one or more mooring rods pivotally secured to the array and tiltable between a stow position and an operative position, wherein at said operative position either a stern or bow of a mooring boat is secured to a free end of a mooring rod and an other of the stern or bow of the mooring boat is secured to the array.

32. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein the array is formed in a circular shape, leaving an opening into a confined space formed thereby.

33. A floating breakwater according to claim 23, wherein one or more rod egments of the array have different elasticity coefficients, to render the array different bending parameters.

34. A floating breakwater according to claim 1, wherein one or more retention members are provided for retaining the rods at fixed positions with respect to one another.

35. A rod segment for a floating breakwater, said rod being a longitudinal element made of flexible material and being connectable at its ends to consecutive such segments.

36. A rod according to claim 35, wherein ends thereof are fixedly connectable to a coupling element for connecting to consecutive such segments.

37. A rod according to claim 35 having a tubular cross-section.

38. A rod according to claim 35, having buoyant properties.

39. A rod according to claim 35, filled with foamed material.

40. A rod according to claim 35, being hollow to contain water.

41. A connecting element for a floating breakwater, said connecting element comprising a plurality of rod receptacles arranged for parallelly retaining the rods at a fixed position with respect to one another.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to breakwaters, piers, docks, wave breakers, wharfs, etc., hereinafter in the specification and claims referred to collectively as breakwaters, used for protecting coasts namely shore lines and harbors, and offshore elements e.g. marine watercrafts and structures. More specifically the invention is concerned with floating such elements, useful in a variety of embodiments and different purposes.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Maritime structures of the concerned type have many purposes. For example, they may be used to minimize wave damage and for erosion control of shores and structures (either at shoreline or at open waters). Furthermore, such structures may be used to form wharfs for ships to moor and for connecting with land. Other examples of use of such structures may be bounding of non-shore areas to define restricted areas, e.g. a swimming zone, maritime sports zone etc. Alternatively, such bounding may be used for bordering hazardous areas or areas of ecological danger (for example oil leaks, etc).

A wide variety of such breakwater structures have been proposed throughout the years of mankind exploring open waters. One type of such breakwater requires employment of massive seabed foundations which are time consuming in setting up, as well as expensive and requiring special equipment for deployment thereof. Floating, flexible such structures, collectively belong to another type, where substantially little time is required for setting up a breakwater or the like, whilst being relatively cheap and offering modularity and flexibility as far shape and features, e.g. aesthetics, water circulation, knock-down time, etc.

However, floating breakwater structures have some disadvantages setting as examples ineffectiveness in reducing height of slow waves, susceptibility to structural failure at extreme conditions, maintenance requirements, etc. One other significant draw back of some prior art floating breakwater structures is the problem of slack/taut of cables of such structures, e.g. owing to waves, tide, etc.

Several prior art publications disclose floating breakwaters, amongst which are the following U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,185,458, 3,792,589, 3,863,455, 3,969,901, 4,316,994, 4,693,631, 4,715,744, 5,429,452, 5,310,283, 5,702,203 and 6,408,780.

Another type of breakwaters is the so-called offshore floating breakwater, used for attenuating waves and reduce sea state wave conditions for safe marine vessel operation. A detailed study concerned with such breakwaters was disclosed in the article ‘Field and numerical comparisons of the RIBS floating breakwater’, by M. Briggs, W. Ye, Z. Demirbilek and J. Zhang. published in the Journal of Hydraulic Research, Vol. 40, 2002, No. 3.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel modular floating breakwater structure of the concerned type, requiring substantially little storage space, cheap in transportation costs and fitted for easy and rapid deployment into its operative state and has some substantive advantages regarding durability and management of dynamic forces developing under wave force.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention calls for a modular breakwater suitable for attenuating waves in open waters and water ways. The breakwater comprises a plurality of rods assembled in a fixed parallel array for positioning in the water at a substantially vertical position at least partially submersed in water, whereby the assembly is flexible and is deformed into an arched/bowed structure.

According to the present invention there is provided a floating breakwater assembly comprising an array of elongate rods articulated to one another for extending at a substantial vertical position at least partially submersed in water, wherein said rods are made of a flexible material and where the array is elastically deformable into an arcuate shape by bending the array.

The breakwater assembly is flexibly deformable in different ways depending on its intended use. For example, the breakwater may be part of a port gateway, where the width of the opening is controllable. It may also be part of an off-shore moor, fixed at the open waters (e.g. suitable as a moor or for protection of constructions like a lighthouse etc.) or deployable from a ship for temporary and rapid assembly, e.g. while unloading cargo from a ship to barges, etc. Other examples are establishing a protected zone of attenuated waves suitable as a sport resort and the like, etc. In each case the span of the assembly, the size of the arch and its direction are determined according to the intended use.

The breakwater may be elastically deformed by pulling the ends thereof in a direction so as to form a bow. This may be carried out for example by pulling the ends directly towards one another, or puling them at a direction giving rise to a vector of force in that direction. Elastic deformation may be obtained by applying force at one or both ends of the array.

The breakwater is made of a plurality of rods, each of which may be constructed of several rod segments, said segments being substantially straight tubular elements made of flexible material allowing its elastic bending. The rod segments may be made of any suitable material, each imparting it with different mechanical properties like elasticity, strength, etc. and is typically manufactured by extrusion. For example, the rod segments may be manufactured of any of the following materials and their combinations: plastic, epoxy, polyester, etc., and may be reinforced by various fibers such as glass, charcoal, Kevlar®, etc.

In order to retain the array floating at a substantially vertical position, one or more upper rods of the array have buoyant properties, e.g. hollow rods filled with foamed polyurethane, etc., whilst rods below said buoying rods are hollow and are filled with water, to thereby stabilize the assembly and support it vertically.

The rods of the assembly are retained at an array such that they extend parallel to one another and about a substantially vertical plane. This is obtained by a rigid connecting element receiving the rods and supporting them at a fixed position. The connecting element is also suitable for applying force on portions of the array to obtain its desired elastic deformation.

According to one particular embodiment, ends of the array are anchored e.g. to an anchor laying or fixed to the sea bed, thus giving rise to generation some vector of force also at a vertical direction. According to a different embodiment of the invention, the array is attached to a buoy which in turn is anchored, thereby substantially reducing the vertical vector of force.

The breakwater is stabilized at an substantially upright floating position by a load of weight associated with a lower end thereof, e.g. suspended from the lower rod or integral therewith or insertable therein.

The breakwater according to some of its applications is fitted with mooring arrangements, such as suitable boat/ship anchoring facilities. According to a specfic arrangement, there is provided one or more mooring rods pivotally secured to the array and tiltable between a stow position and an operative position, wherein at said operative position either a stem or bow of a mooring boat is secured to a free end of a mooring rod and an other of the stem or bow of the mooring boat is secured to the array.

According to still an application of the present invention, a deck is mounted on the breakwater, for easy access along the breakwater and optionally for transfer facilities such as electricity, fresh water supply, sewage suction, communication cables, etc. The deck may be integrally formed with an upper rod of the array, or may be mounted thereon. The deck may be constructed of a plurality of segments attached to or mounted on the rods and may also have buoyant parameters to assist in establishing buoyancy and positioning of the array in the water.

Furthermore, it is possible for one or more rod segments of the array have different elasticity coefficients (dimensions, material, shape, etc. of a rod segment), to render the array different bending parameters.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In order to understand the invention and to see how it may be carried out in practice, some embodiments will now be described, by way of non-limiting examples only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a representation illustrating a breakwater in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention protecting a dock;

FIG. 2 is a closer representation of the breakwater of FIG. 1, where also some of the submerged elements are viewed;

FIG. 3A is a schematic side view of an anchoring arrangement of a breakwater in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention, as in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3B is a schematic side view of an anchoring arrangement in accordance with a different embodiment of the present invention;

15 FIGS. 4A-4D are detailed views of different elements used in conjunction with the assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is directed to a deck used in conjunction with a breakwater of the present invention, wherein:

FIG. 5A is a front view of a breakwater fitted with a deck; and

FIG. 5B is a sectioned view taken along line V-V in FIG. 5A;

FIG. 6 illustrates a modification of the invention wherein rod segments comprise different elasticity coefficients;

FIG. 7A illustrates an anchorage constructed of two breakwaters in accordance with the present invention anchored to a land portion;

FIG. 7B illustrates a breakwater in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention serving as a port entry;

FIG. 8 illustrates a breakwater in accordance with the present invention used as a temporary off-shore moor deployed from a ship;

FIG. 9 illustrates an off-shore moor;

FIG. 10 illustrates how a breakwater in accordance with the present invention may be used for defining a confined marine space;

FIG. 11A illustrates a breakwater in accordance with the present invention fitted with improved mooring arrangements; and

FIG. 11B is a side view showing in more detail a mooring arrangement as in FIG. 11A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF SPECIFIC EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1 is a bird's view of a breakwater in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention generally designated 20 comprising an array of rods 22 1o fixedly secured as will become apparent hereinafter and retained in the open waters at an arced/bowed configuration by means of bending force applied to respective ends 26 of the array thereby attenuating waves at the area designated 30, offering reduced sea state wave conditions around the deck 32.

With further attention directed also to FIG. 2, the breakwater 20 is seen in more detail and it is noticed that the array 22 comprises a plurality of longitudinal rods 26 parallelly retained at a substantially vertical/upright position, partially submersed in the water.

The rods are typically manufactured by an extrusion process and are made, for example of any combination of materials such as plastic, epoxy, polyester and may be reinforced by various fibers such as Kevlar®, glass or charcoal fibers, etc., as known in the art. The rods are flexible and are normally biased to return to their straight position.

Parallel relationship and the fixed position of the rods with respect to one another is obtained by end pieces 31 (one seen in FIG. 2) and a plurality of retention members 32 and connecting members 34, as will be explained hereinafter in more detail with reference to FIGS. 4A-4D.

The breakwater 20 has a bowed shape owing to the force applied thereto in a radial/tandem direction wherein the end piece 31 is linked to a buoy 40 via link 42 and buoy 40 is in turn anchored via cable 44 to a concrete slab 46 lying on the sea bed. It is appreciated that the link 42 and cable 44 may be made of chains, cables, rods, etc. imparting various degrees of freedom. It is further appreciated that the positioning of the anchor, namely, slab 46 or other suitable anchor (e.g. natural rock, steel anchor, etc.) will result in obtaining different arcs of the breakwater.

The purpose of buoy 40 is to reduce vertical force vector acting in a downwards direction, to thereby stabilize the array 22 at a more-or-less fixed level, whereby a vertical degree of freedom is absorbed through the buoy 40. It is however appreciated that the end piece 31 may be directly connected to the anchor 46. It is further appreciated that the length of cable 44 may be changeable upon demand to change the shape of the breakwater, depending on magnitude and direction of waves. It is further appreciated that in case of a serious storm, one or both ends of the breakwater may be detached from the anchor to avoid damage and to better withstand the powerful waves.

FIG. 3A offers a schematic side view of a modification of a breakwater in accordance with the present invention, similar to that of FIG. 1. In this embodiment, rods 60 at a lower portion of the array of rods are hollow rods filled with water and upper rods 62 are floating rods, namely rods filled with foamed polyurethane, or the like, to thereby ensure that the array of rods 22 will float. Retaining the array in its upright position as in FIG. 3A is carried out by a load of weight 66 suspended from the end piece 31. The weight may be for example a metal payload, etc., and it may also be integrally formed with the lowermost rod 68 or attached thereto, e.g. by link 70.

The buoy 40 has at its lower end a mass 74 to maintain it at an upright position, as in FIG. 3A. As in the embodiment of FIG. 2, the array 22 is secured at its end by an end plate 31 which is linked to buoy 40 by chain 42 and in turn, the buoy is anchored via chain 44 to the anchor slab 46.

FIG. 3B illustrates a different arrangement wherein the rods 76 are supported and positioned by a retention member 78 articulated to buoy 80 by two rigid links 82 and supported at an upright position by a load 86 attached at a lower end of the retention member 78. The arrangement disclosed in FIG. 3B may suit for floating the array and may be used as an end-arrangement where suitable anchoring means are provided or as a floating aid positioned in between ends of the array.

FIGS. 4A-4D illustrate sections through different elements used in conjunction with an array of a breakwater in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 4A illustrates an end portion of an array of a breakwater in accordance with the present invention wherein the rods 90 are hollow tubes filled with foamed polyurethane and are sealed by end caps 92 (such caps are not necessary for the lower rods which may be opened to allow sea water to enter into the rods). The rods 90 are retained at their fixed position by a retention member 94 in the form of member 78 as illustrated in FIGS. 3B and 4B, said retention members 78 comprises a plurality of apertures receiving the rods 98 and securing them at a fixed position. The retention member 78 may be slided over the rods or may be clampingly mounted over the array of rods and secured in position by various clamping arrangements (not shown).

FIGS. 4C and 4D illustrate coaxially extending successive rod segments 102A and 102B coupled to one another by a coupling element 104. Accordingly, an array in accordance with the present invention may consist of a plurality of rod segments of reasonable length to be stored, e.g. in containers or the like, rather than having to store rods of significant length. The coupling element 104 may be attached to the respective ends of the rod segments by snap-engagement, screw coupling as in FIG. 4D, connecting pins, etc. This arrangement further offers different benefits, e.g. easy replacement of a damaged rod segment, changing the length of the breakwater by introducing rod segments of different lengths, changing the buoyancy parameters by replacing the rod segments by other segments having different buoyancy parameters, replacing rod segments by other such segments having different elasticity coefficients (see FIG. 6), etc.

FIGS. 5A and 5B are concerned with mounting a deck 120 in the breakwater, as illustrated for example in FIG. 11A. The deck 120 may have different purposes, fist it may be suitable for providing accessibility along the breakwater such as in the example of FIG. 11A whereby individuals may walk along the breakwater 122 and reach a moored boat, etc. The deck 120 may further be suited for transfer of facilities from the land to boats mooring along a dock, e.g. electricity, fresh water supply, sewage suction, communication cables, etc.

The deck 120 comprises a plurality of T-like deck elements 126 each comprising a substantially flat surface 128 extending above an uppermost rod 130 and a rod engaging portion 134 mounted on several consecutive rods, e.g. by sliding the elements 126 over the rods 130 as in the illustrated example, or by clamping or otherwise attaching thereto (not shown). Typically the deck elements 126 are made of lightweight material, e.g. injection molded plastic and may be filled with foamed material to increase the overall buoyancy of the water break. It is advantageous that a top surface 129 of the deck elements 126 be fitted with an anti-slip arrangement e.g. a roughened surface, a coating of anti-slip material etc.

The rod engagement portion 134 comprises several apertures 138 through which different cables and supply lines may extend, as mentioned hereinabove.

It is further appreciated that the deck elements may be of different size and may be, in accordance with an embodiment of the invention (not shown) be integral with an upper rod of the breakwater.

FIG. 6 is a schematic illustration of a breakwater in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention generally designated 144 comprising a central portion 146 consisting of three rod segments 148 and extending between two end portions 152 in turn consisting of three rod segments 154. In accordance with this particular embodiment the rod segments 148 of the central portion 146 have a lower elasticity coefficient than rod segments 154 of the end portions 152, whereby upon applying bending force by articulating ends 160 to anchors 162 the breakwater 144 elastically deforms in a non-homogenous fashion such that the central portion 146 deforms less than the end portions 152. This arrangement is suitable for obtaining breakwaters of different shapes and spans.

FIG. 7A illustrates an anchorage 170 along a land portion 172, said anchorage comprising two breakwaters 174 and 176, each having a first end 174A and 176A respectively, anchored to the land portion and an opposite end 174B and 176B, respectively, anchored to the sea bed via buoys 174C and 176C, respectively, as explained hereinbefore.

It is apparent from the embodiment of FIG. 7A that each of the breakwaters 174 and 176 is arced in a different fashion whereby the entrance to the anchorage has an opening at 180 facing a desired direction away from the waves and having a size suitable to facilitate easy maneuvering of boats intended to moor in that anchorage.

It is further appreciated that an anchorage in accordance with such an embodiment is easily assembled and disassembled, requiring only little labor and being inexpensive.

In the embodiment of FIG. 7B there is illustrated an anchorage 186 of permanent nature comprising two molded concrete breakwaters 188, or otherwise formed solid breakwaters, defining between them an entrance 190 into the anchorage. The entrance 190 comprises however a secondary breakwater 194 of the type disclosed in accordance with the present invention wherein a first end thereof 196 is pivotally anchored at an end of the fixed breakwater 188 with a second end thereof 198 connected to a winch spool 202 via cable 204.

The arrangement is such that the entrance into the anchorage 186 is protected by the breakwater 194 to thereby attenuate waves and protect boats moored within the anchorage 186. However, in accordance with the particular embodiment of FIG. 7B, the span and direction of the breakwater 194 may be altered, depending on direction and magnitude of the wind, by tensioning or loosening the cable 204.

In accordance with a particular embodiment, the arrangement may be such that the breakwater 194 may be closed, partially opened or widely opened, at will by, pivoting the breakwater 194 about its pivot end 196, where it may displace between different positions.

FIG. 8 illustrates an off-shore moor 214 wherein a breakwater 216 in accordance with the present invention is constructed and assembled as previously disclosed wherein its respective ends 218 are tensioned towards one another via cables 220 secured to winches 224 at the bow of a cargo ship 228.

This arrangement has several particular advantages. For example, the breakwater 216 may be stored aboard the ship 228 and may be erected at any desired position within a short period of time. Second, the position of the ship may continuously change, depending on the direction of wind (in the present example represented by arrow 230) whereby the breakwater 216 changes its position to maintain a concave position facing the wind.

This arrangement offers attenuating of waves at the surroundings of the ship 228, to facilitate unloading cargo from the ship to a barge 230. Such an arrangement may also be used to attenuate waves at the vicinity of ships carrying out different works at open waters, e.g. maintenance of underwater oil pipes, communication lines, etc.

In FIG. 9 there is illustrated an off-shore moor 240, typically of the kind provided at shallow waters wherein a breakwater 242 is provided, of the type disclosed hereinbefore, with its respective ends 244 tensioned towards one another by cables 246 via buoys 248, to thereby reduce vertical amplitude, as explained hereinbefore. In the present example there are provided two cables 246 which have the additional purpose of mooring thereto the boats 252 and accordingly, suitable fenders 254 are provided on the cables 246.

Turning now to FIG. 10 there is illustrated a circular anchorage 258 with an opening 260 leaving entrance into the confined space, where the respective ends 262 and 264 are anchored to a common slab anchor 266. The arrangement disclosed in FIG. 10 may be used as an anchorage, as a confined swimming zone, as a protecting arrangement for attenuating waves while carrying out different marine works etc.

In FIGS. 11A and 11B there is illustrated a breakwater 122 fitted with a deck 120 as disclosed hereinbefore with reference to FIGS. 5A and 5B and where several mooring rods 272 are provided. The rods 272 are pivotally secured at a first end 276 to a securing member 279 (similar to end plate member 31 as in FIG. 3A) and are tiltable between a first, substantially upright position (see rods 272A) and an operative position (rods 272B) extending substantially horizontally wherein a light boat 278 is moored to the breakwater 122 whereby its stem 280 is anchored to securing members 279 of the breakwater 122 (by rope 281), and its bow 284 is anchored to ends 286 of the rods 272B (via rope 288). This position provides improved support of the boat 278, also at more rough waters.

Whilst some embodiments have been described and illustrated with reference to some drawings, the artisan will appreciate that many variations are possible which do not depart from the general scope of the invention, mutatis, mutandis.