Title:
Climate control head cover
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A head scarf adapted to be worn typically beneath a motorcycle helmet or other headgear includes an apron depending from its rear beneath its headband. A pocket within the apron holds cooling or warming elements against the wearer's neck to modulate wearer comfort. Thin, baffle-stitched, comfort control packs fit within the pockets, the packs containing water absorption crystals that absorb and thermally treated water without substantial dripping or rapid evaporation. A commercially available warming envelope may be substituted for convenience when appropriate. A triangular tail beneath the pocket helps hold the pocket in place against the neck, and a pony-tail aperture above the pocket prevents a wearer's long hair from interfering with the pocket's juxtaposition on the wearer's neck.



Inventors:
Harrison, Jone E. (Flower Mound, TX, US)
Walters, Letha D. (New Milford, CT, US)
Application Number:
10/918537
Publication Date:
02/17/2005
Filing Date:
08/13/2004
Assignee:
HARRISON JONE E.
WALTERS LETHA D.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A42B1/04; A42B1/24; A42B3/10; A42C5/04; (IPC1-7): A42B5/00; A41D3/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
TOMPKINS, ALISSA JILL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Guy, Manning 405 Park Plaza Building V. (2501 Parkview Drive, Fort Worth, TX, 76102, US)
Claims:
1. A personal comfort control system comprising a scarf adapted to be worn on a wearer's head, the scarf having a top panel having a front and a rear corresponding to the forehead and rear of the wearer's head; two side panels extending on opposite sides of the top panel and having a lower margin; a headband surrounding the lower margin; and securing means for securing the scarf to the wearer's head; an apron depending from the rear of the top panel and having a top end proximate the top panel and a distal tip; a waist disposed between the top end and the tip and defining a maximum width of the apron; and a pocket disposed between the top end and the tip and having an interior accessible through a mouth; and a comfort control pack adapted to be received within the pocket interior.

2. The personal comfort control system according to claim 1 wherein the apron further comprises a baffle coextensive with the waist and forming a bottom of the pocket; and a tailpiece disposed below the waist.

3. The personal comfort control system according to claim 1 wherein the securing means comprises tails extending from the headband adjacent the rear of the top panel and adapted to be tied into a knot over the apron.

4. The personal comfort control system according to claim 1 wherein the scarf includes stitching surrounding and defining an aperture disposed above the pocket and adapted to receive at least a portion of the wearer's hair.

5. The personal comfort control system according to claim 1 wherein the apron further comprises a triangular tailpiece disposed below the pocket and adapted to anchor the apron against the wearer's shoulders.

6. The personal comfort control system according to claim 1 wherein the comfort control pack further comprises a pouch having two layers of water-permeable web material sealed together at their perimeters to form an interior; compartment stitching separating the interior into open regions; and water absorption means for absorbing and retaining temperature controlled water.

7. The personal comfort control system according to claim 6 wherein the pouch is substantially trapezoidal in shape and adapted to rest within the pocket above a baffle extending across the apron.

8. The personal comfort control system according to claim 6 wherein the apron includes a triangular tailpiece disposed below the waist; and the pouch extends below the waist into the tailpiece.

9. The personal comfort control system according to claim 6 wherein the water absorption means comprises a plurality of water absorbing polymer crystals distributed among the open regions.

10. The personal comfort control system according to claim 1 and further comprising a brim coupled to the headband and extending forward from the front of the scarf.

11. The personal comfort control system according to claim 1 and further comprising closure means for affirmatively closing the mouth of the pocket.

12. The personal comfort control system according to claim 11 wherein the closure means comprises hook and loop fastener strips disposed within an interior lip of the mouth.

13. A personal comfort control system comprising a scarf adapted to be worn on a wearer's head, the scarf having a front and a rear; a top panel extending between the front and rear; two side panels extending on opposite sides of the top panel and having a lower margin; a headband surrounding at least a portion of the lower margin; tails extending from the headband adjacent the rear and adapted to be tied into a knot behind the wearer's head; an apron depending from the top panel and having a top end proximate the top panel and a distal tip; a transverse waist between the top end and the tip; a tailpiece below the waist; and a pocket disposed above the tip and having a pocket interior accessible through a mouth; and a comfort control pack adapted to be received within the pocket interior and having at least two layers of water-permeable web material sealed together at their perimeters to form a pouch having a pouch interior; compartment stitching separating the pouch interior into open chambers; and a plurality of water absorbing polymer crystals distributed among the chambers.

14. The personal comfort control system according to claim 13 and further comprising button-hole stitching surrounding and defining a hair slit above the apron.

15. The personal comfort control system according to claim 13 and further comprising a brim coupled to the headband and extending forward from the front of the scarf, and hook and loop fastener closure strips disposed within an interior lip of the mouth.

16. A method of improving comfort for a motorcycle rider, the method comprising providing a head scarf adapted to be worn on the head of the rider, the scarf having a top panel flanked by side panels forming a cover for the top of the rider's head; a headband surrounding the panels at their lower margin; tails extending rearward from the headband and adapted to be tied behind the rider's head; an apron depending from the rear of the top panel between the tails; a pocket disposed on the apron below the top panel and having a horizontal opening disposed toward an interior of the scarf and forming an access mouth for the pocket; providing a plurality of comfort control packs adapted to be received within the pocket; then selecting at least one comfort control pack and storing the remaining comfort control packs for later use; then inserting the selected comfort control pack it into the pocket; then placing the scarf on the rider's head and securing it thereto by tying the tails behind the rider's head over the apron; then compressing the apron against the rider's neck to cause the comfort control pack to conform thereto; then monitoring the temperature of the comfort control pack and replacing it with one of the stored comfort control packs as necessary to regulate the rider's comfort to the rider's satisfaction.

17. The method according to claim 16 wherein the scarf further includes button-hole stitching surrounding and defining a hair exit port disposed at the rear of the top panel above the apron; and the method further includes the step of extending the rider's hair through the hair exit port and disposing it atop the apron prior to tying the tails behind the apron.

18. The method according to claim 16 wherein each comfort control pack has a pouch having two layers of water-permeable web material sealed together at their perimeters to form an interior; compartment stitching separating the interior into open regions; and a plurality of water absorbing polymer crystals distributed among the open regions and adapted to absorb and hold temperature-treated water; and the method includes the additional step of soaking the comfort control packs in temperature controlled water until the polymer crystals saturate with water before the step of selecting one of said plurality of comfort control packs for insertion into the pocket.

19. The personal comfort control system according to claim 16 wherein the head scarf further comprises a brim coupled to the headband and extending forward from the front of the scarf; and hook and loop fastener closure strips disposed within an interior lip of the mouth.

20. The personal comfort control system according to claim 19 wherein the head scarf further comprises hook and loop fastener closure strips disposed within an interior lip of the mouth.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates generally to headgear and particularly to scarves and other head wear intended to accompany motorcycle helmets and other clothing. More particularly, this invention relates to head wear incorporating comfort control apparatus for cooling or warming the wearer. Still more particularly, this invention relates to a head scarf having a pocket depending from the rear of its headband which contains a cooling or warming insert which the pocket positions and holds against the wearer's neck.

2. Description of Related Art

Motorcycle helmets can become hot and uncomfortable, especially in hot weather. Wearers commonly employ specialized scarfs called “do-rags” to cover their scalps beneath their helmets to absorb perspiration and deter chafing. The do-rags are fitted to the head and include a headband surrounding a close fitting scalp cover, the headband extending to the rear on either side into ties adapted to be knotted behind the head. Some do-rags include aprons depending from the headband to protect the wearer's neck below the helmet from sunburn. Do-rags have developed into a fashion item for motorcycle enthusiasts, and they come in many colors and configurations but maintain the basic structure described above.

Motorcycle and bicycle riding outdoors exposes riders to elements, including sun and wind. Despite a constant breeze from the bike's motion, sun can bear down and make riders very uncomfortable. Merely soaking their do-rags in cold water is unsatisfactory because it retards perspiration absorption and can deteriorate helmet liners. Further, the back of the neck comprises a primary pressure point that can help cool or warm the body by working with the circulatory system. Means for cooling riders' necks that take advantage of this factor would increase rider comfort significantly and could help guard against sunstroke and heat exhaustion. Likewise, during cold and wet weather, even the most well bundled rider can become chilled from prolonged exposure the elements. Means for holding a warming pad against the rider's neck can substantially increase rider comfort.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a head scarf with means for regulating wearer comfort and safety.

It is another object of this invention to provide a motorcycle head scarf with a pocket for positioning a comfort control pack strategically to increase rider comfort.

It is another object of this invention to provide a motorcycle head scarf including a rear apron which holds a comfort control pack against the rider's neck.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a head scarf that manages a wearer's long hair to prevent interference with a rear apron bearing comfort control packs.

The foregoing and other objects of this invention are achieved by providing a head scarf adapted to be worn typically beneath a motorcycle helmet or other headgear includes an apron depending from its rear beneath its headband. A pocket within the apron holds cooling or warming elements against the wearer's neck to modulate wearer comfort. Thin, baffle-stitched, comfort control packs fit within the pockets, the packs containing water absorption crystals that absorb and thermally treated water without substantial dripping or rapid evaporation. A commercially available warming envelope may be substituted for convenience when appropriate. A triangular tail beneath the pocket helps hold the pocket in place against the neck, and a pony-tail aperture above the pocket prevents a wearer's long hair from interfering with the pocket's juxtaposition on the wearer's neck.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The novel features believed characteristic of the present invention are set forth in appended claims. The invention itself, however, as well as a preferred mode of use and further objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following detailed description of an illustrative embodiment when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 depicts in front elevational view a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 shows in left rear perspective the present invention of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 shows in left rear perspective the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1 tied onto the head of a wearer.

FIG. 4 shows in left side elevational view the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1 worn by a user.

FIG. 5 details in cut-away section view as indicated in FIG. 4 a portion of an apron appendage of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 shows a left side elevational view corresponding to FIG. 4 of a user wearing an alternate embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 7A, 7B show two variations of a preferred embodiment of a comfort control pack adapted for use with the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 shows in section view as indicated in FIG. 7B, and typical also for FIGS. 7A, 9A, 9B, the open regions within the comfort control packs of the present invention

FIGS. 9A, 9B show two variations of an alternate embodiment of a comfort control pack adapted for use with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

With reference now to the figures, and in particular to FIGS. 1-4, head cover 10 comprises two side panels 14 flanking top panel 13 which together cover the head of wearer 1 (FIG. 3) above headband 11. Separated by seams 16, panels 13, 14 extend from wearer 1's brow to the back of his head, converging slightly toward apron 20 at the rear of head cover 10. Headband 11 borders panels 14 at their lower perimeter and extends around wearer 1's forehead and temples, terminating near apron 20 in rearwardly extending tails 12. Tails 12 are adapted to be tied behind wearer 1's head and over apron 20, thereby securing head cover 10 in place. Tails 12 urge apron 20 against the back of wearer 1's head and knot 17 comfortably rests at the top of wearer 1's neck just below his skull. Referring also to FIG. 6, an alternate embodiment of the present invention includes brim 19 extending forward from headband 11 to shade wearer 1's eyes and brow.

Depending from top panel 13 at the rear of wearer 1's head, apron 20 comprises a substantially diamond-shaped appendage reaching downward below headband 11 to cover wearer 1's neck. Apron 20 terminates in tailpiece 21 which lays on wearer 1's shoulders. Apron 20 attaches by known means near the rear of panel 13. At its attachment to panel 13, apron 20 is substantially as wide as panel 13, a small gap 22 remaining between apron 20 and headband 11. Apron 20 widens as it descends to a maximum width at waist 27, disposed near wearer 1's shoulders, then converges in tailpiece 21 to tip 28. As best seen in FIG. 4, apron 20 lays against wearer 1's neck 3, with tip 28 extending down wearer 1's shoulders beneath waist 27. Preferably, for an average sized adult, apron 20 is approximately five and three-fourths (5¾ in.) inches wide at waist 27, narrowing to approximately four (4 in.) inches adjacent gap 22. If substantially wider, wind will catch apron 20 and urge it away from wearer 1's neck 3. Substantially narrower, and it may fail to cover the back of neck 3.

Considering now also FIG. 5, apron 20 comprises two laminations of cloth joined by stitching on three sides to create pocket 23. Mouth 24 disposed at or just below gap 22 provides an opening into pocket 23 inside head cover 10. Preferably mouth 24 is substantially as wide as apron 20 and extends horizontally across pocket 23. One having ordinary skill in the art will recognize that mouth 24 could have other configurations without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention, such as extending along one or more sides (not shown) of pocket 23 instead of across its top as depicted. Mouth 24 further may include closure means 25 (FIG. 5) such as hook-and-loop strips (commonly known by the trade name Velcro), buttons, snaps, elastic or the like, but such closure means are not considered critical to the operation of pocket 23.

Referring again to FIG. 1 and to FIGS. 7A, 7B, pocket 23 extends vertically from mouth 24 to baffle stitches 26 which traverse apron 20 horizontally at its widest point at waist 27. This imparts to pocket 23 a substantially trapezoidal shape defined by the sides of apron 20 which diverge between mouth 24 and baffle 26. Pocket 23 thus is adapted to receive and hold comfort control pack 30 (FIGS. 7A, 7B) discussed in more detail below. The length, width and general shape of comfort control pack 30 and pocket 23 are chosen to reflect the overall shape of wearer 1's neck 3 between his shoulders and the base of his skull. When head cover 10 is worn as described above, pocket 23 rests against and substantially covers the back of neck 3, thus maximizing the engagement of comfort control pack 30 with neck 3.

Tailpiece 21 performs an important function in this process. Though pocket 23 is somewhat thicker than most of head cover 10 because it contains comfort control pack 30, tailpiece 21 comprises only two laminations of cloth, making it considerably thinner. Tailpiece 21 lays flat against wearer 1's shoulders and tends to adhere thereto when damp from perspiration or from moisture from comfort control pack 30. This tendency to adhere to wearer 1's shoulders helps hold apron 20 and comfort control pack 30 in place despite movement of wearer 1's head.

As best seen in FIG. 1, head cover 10 further comprises a central aperture 15 through apron 20 above mouth 24 of pocket 23. As seen in FIGS. 3, 4, wearer 1 may have long hair which could interfere with apron 20 holding comfort control pack 30 against wearer 1's neck 3. With ordinary do-rags, wearer 1 simply allows his hair 5 to depend down his neck 3 beneath apron 20, either braided into a pony tail as depicted or allowed to spread out unbraided (not shown). Aperture 15 allows wearer 1 to extend his hair 5 through apron 20 so that it may lay on top of apron 20, either above knot 17 as depicted or under knot 17 (not shown).

Aperture 15 preferably comprises a vertical slit approximately three (3 in.) inches long, button-hole stitched to prevent raveling and located either within top panel 13 or apron 20 approximately one-half to one ({fraction (1/2)}-1 in.) inches above pocket 23. In such configuration, aperture 15 typically will be visible but not obtrusively noticeable should wearer 1 have short hair (not shown) confined beneath head cover 10, allowing aperture 15 to remain substantially closed rather than gaping open. One having ordinary skill in the art will recognize, however, that the exact configuration of aperture 15 may vary in orientation, shape, position and size, including possibly a round, square or oval opening rather than a simple button-hole stitched slit, without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

As depicted in FIGS. 7A, 7B and 9A, 9B, respectively, comfort control packs 30, 130 differ by their bottom margins. Comfort control pack 30 comprises a substantially trapezoidal shape adapted to fit snugly within pocket 23 between mouth 24 and baffle 26 as described above. Comfort control pack 130, by contrast, further comprises a substantially triangular bottom margin. Comfort control pack 130 also fills apron 20 below waist 27 when transverse baffle stitching 26 is omitted to create a pocket larger than pocket 23 by the interior space within tailpiece 21. In addition to laying against neck 3 of wearer 1, comfort control pack 130 lays partially against wearer 1's shoulders and affects a larger area. Selection between these two alternative configurations is a matter of preference for wearer 1, and one having ordinary skill in the art will recognize that in all other respects, comfort control packs 30 within pocket 23, and comfort control pack 130 filling apron 20 down into tailpiece 21 perform similarly.

Continuing with FIGS. 7A, 7B and 9A, 9B, comfort control packs 30, 130 preferably comprise two thin layers 31, 32 and 131, 132 of flexible material stitched or otherwise sealed along their perimeters to form an envelope or pouch adapted to lay flat. Preferably, layers 31, 32, 131, 132 comprise thin cloth such as satin, silk, cotton or the like which have a water permeable yet relatively close weave, or mesh size. Preferably a four (4) thread overlock finishing stitch is employed to both surround and seal the edges of cloth layers 31, 32 and 131, 132 such that no gaps remain which significantly exceed the mesh size of the cloth itself One having ordinary skill in the art will recognize that other materials could comprise layers 31, 32, 131, 132, such as plastic or paper, as long as the materials exhibit the required traits of water permeability and relatively small mesh value for containing polymer crystals 40 discussed below.

Comfort control packs 30, 130 are depicted in FIGS. 7A, 7B and 9A, 9B, respectively, as bearing internal stitching 33A, 33B, 133A, 133B which forms internal baffles dividing comfort control packs 30, 130 into smaller, unconfined regions or chambers 35. Crystals 40, discussed below, preferably are distributed approximately evenly within chambers 35 but are free to migrate between chambers 35, such as when pushed around by wearer 1 to redistribute them. Stitching 33A, 33B, 133A, 133B preferably comprises a simple, straight line, open stitch which does not extend to the perimeter of comfort control packs 30, 130. As depicted in FIGS. 7A, 9A, stitching 33A, 133A forms a continuous barrier in the shape of an “S,” whereas stitching 33B, 133B in FIGS. 7B, 9B comprises three separate, substantially vertical straight baffles. Though stitches 33A, 133A provide the advantage of simplicity of manufacture, stitches 33B, 133B provide the advantage of dividing packs 30, 130 vertically, making them easier to conform the neck 3 of wearer 1, as discussed below.

Contained within comfort control packs 30, 130, a plurality of water polymer crystals 40 is adapted to absorb and hold water for a substantial amount of time. When comfort control packs 30, 130 are soaked in water, crystals 40 absorb the water and swell to many times their dry volume. Further, crystals 40 retain the original temperature of the water for a substantial amount of time. Thus, if the water is cold, crystals 40 stay cold, and if the water is hot, crystals 40 remain warm for sufficient time to achieve the goals of the present invention, comfort control for wearer 1.

Crystals 40 preferably comprise one of a number of one to two (1-2 mm) millimeter sized water polymer crystaline materials, though the size may vary depending largely upon the mesh size and stitching of packs 30, 130. When moistened, such crystals 40 absorb as much as 400 times their weight in water, turning gelatinous and swelling to many times their dry volume, and retain the water and size for many hours. A sufficient quantity of crystals 40 is contained within comfort control packs 30, 130 such that when saturated with water, crystals 40 substantially fill comfort control packs 30, 130. A suitable crystal 40 is catalog reference number “WCP” available from The Artistic Shop, L.L.C. of Pewaukee, Wis. (www.theartisticshop.com). Preferably, comfort control pack 30 contains approximately one-eighth ({fraction (1/8)} tsp.) teaspoon of such crystals 40, and comfort control pack 130 contains approximately one-fourth ({fraction (1/4)} tsp.) teaspoon of such crystals 40. One having ordinary skill in the art will recognize that other materials in varying sizes and water absorbing capacities will perform the function of crystals 40 as long as they are capable of absorbing and holding cold water for a substantial period of time, preferably at least two hours, and have the thermal trait of remaining substantially at the temperature of the cold water for at least similar period of time.

Head cover 10 preferably is made from a soft, relatively thin and pliable cloth such as cotton, silk, linen, polyester or blends thereof, cut and stitched into separate panels 13, 14, headband 11 and tails 12 and apron 20. A suitable material for head cover 10 is light to medium weight broadcloth; heavier materials such as wool and canvas do not perform as well. Head cover 10 also may be lined on its inner surface adjacent wearer 1's head for added comfort. Preferably, pocket 23 also comprises the same material as head cover 10, being either folded portions of one lamination of apron 20 or a separate piece stitched thereto.

In operation, wearer 1 wishing to mitigate hot temperatures first places a plurality comfort control packs 30, 130 into ice water and soaks them for approximately one hour, or until crystals 40 cease to expand and substantially fill comfort control packs 30, 130. Wearer 1 then selects one comfort control pack 30, 130 and stores the others for later use. Wearer 1 next flattens the selected pack 30, 130 by mashing and pushing crystals 40 to be sure they are evenly distributed. Wearer 1 then inserts comfort control pack 30, 130 through mouth 24 into apron 20, keeping its bottom margin directed toward tip 21. Comfort control pack 30, 130 may be folded about a vertical axis slightly to ease insertion. Once comfort control pack 30, 130 is inside mouth 24, wearer 1 again flattens it, pushing its divergent sides to the edges apron 20. If wearer 1 is employing the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1, he selects a comfort control pack 30 and inserts it such that its bottom margin fits against baffle 26 and its top rests just below mouth 24, making sure that its sides extend to fill pocket 23. If wearer 1 employs the alternate embodiment having no baffle 26 at waist 27 of apron 20 (FIG. 6), wearer 1 selects comfort control pack 130 and inserts it through mouth 24 such that its bottom margin fills tip 21, completely filling apron 20 beneath mouth 24.

Next, wearer 1 places head cover 10 on his head with apron 20 depending toward the back of his neck 3. If wearer 1 has long hair and so desires, he may thread it, braided into a pony tail or not, through aperture 15 from the inside of head cover 10 (as viewed in FIG. 1). Next, wearer 1 situates headband 11 across his forehead and along his temples above his ear 2 (FIGS. 3, 4) and ties tails 12 at the top of his neck over apron 20. He may tie tails 12 either under or over his hair, as he prefers. Next he places his palm (not shown) atop apron 20 where comfort control pack 30, 130 rests and compresses it against his neck 3 so that it becomes concave forward and conforms to his neck 3, thereby maximizing its effect. Wearer 1 then places his motorcycle helmet or other headgear (not shown) over head cover 10 and proceeds to engage in his desired activity. Alternately, wearer 1 may dispense with additional headgear and just wear head cover 10 alone.

In either case, after a period of time, comfort control pack 30, 130 will lose its cooling or warming effect. Wearer 1 then may, at his discretion, replace comfort control pack 30, 130 by opening mouth 24 and removing pack 30, 130, replacing it with a fresh comfort control pack 30, 130 which he earlier preferably stored in insulating material to maintain its temperature. This replacement operation may be performed without first removing head cover 10 from wearer 1's head, because apron 20 extends below gap 22 sufficiently far that mouth 24 may be accessed from the rear without untying knot 17. The used comfort control packs 30, 130 can be retained and reused many times.

In cold climate conditions, comfort control packs 30, 130 may be soaked in hot water and otherwise handled as described above. Alternately, packs 30, 130 may be replaced with self-contained warming packs (not shown) commercially available as hand or pocket warmers. Such warming packs comprise plastic envelopes containing one or more chemicals which, when activated (by squeezing the package in some cases, and by simply opening it in others) typically mix one or more chemicals to emit a small amount of heat over a period of time, typically twenty (20 hr.) hours or more. A suitable warming pack is catalog number 27920 available from Texsport of Houston, Tex. (www.texsport.com). Wearer 1 first selects one or more warming packs and activates them to start the heating process. He then inserts them into apron 20 as described above for comfort control packs 30, 130. The warming packs may not fit quite as neatly within pocket 23 or apron 20 as do comfort control packs 30, 130, but can be centered and juxtaposed to neck 3. Wearer 1 also may compress the packs against his neck 3 as described above to conform them thereto and maximize the warming effect. Likewise, when they loses their warming effect, he may open mouth 24 and replace one or both as discussed above for comfort control packs 30, 130. Unlike comfort control packs 30. 130, however, commercially available warming packs typically are not reuseable.

The present invention, described in either its preferred or alternate embodiment, serves to modulate wearer 1's comfort in hot or cold conditions, thus enhancing the enjoyment of a motorcycle ride or other activity. Head cover 10 may be employed as described by motorcycle and bicycle riders, hikers, construction workers, fishermen or adults or children engaged in outdoor recreation or other activity, either with or without other head gear such as helmets, caps or hats.

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to one or more embodiments, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and detail may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, tails 12 could be substantially shorter than shown in the figures and secured to each other in the back of wearer 1's head with hook-and-loop fasteners (not shown). Alternately, headband 11 could extend continuously around wearer 1's head and comprise an elastic band or include adjustability apparatus commonly appearing on baseball caps (not shown), with apron 20 extending through an aperture (not shown) left between top panel 13 and headband 11. Additionally, apron 20 has been discussed above as comprising a separate object attached to top panel 13, but it could comprise an extension thereof, folded into pleats to achieve the described shape. Pocket 23 further could be formed of separate materials, or it could be formed by folding the material apron 20 is made from to form a double layer of material.