Title:
Social skill builder game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A developmental board game and method are provided that include a playing surface with a plurality of spaces, one or more player tokens, and a manner to determine how many spaces to proceed. Corresponding to the spaces where a player “lands” are various cards of distinct types. The type of questions and directions on the cards permit a balanced and somewhat controlled reaction and interaction between the players themselves and the monitoring teacher or psychologist. The board game is particularly, but not exclusively, adapted to develop and improve behavior skills for children and adults with developmental disabilities. These disabilities may include ones such as Mental Retardation, Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, Down's Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, and Spina Bifida. The Social Skill Builder games are specifically designed as an educational tool to help teach appropriate social skills, problem-solving, turn-taking, commenting, and peer interaction to children and adults with developmental disabilities.



Inventors:
Farmer, Elizabeth A. (Anderson, IN, US)
Application Number:
10/828682
Publication Date:
10/28/2004
Filing Date:
04/21/2004
Assignee:
FARMER ELIZABETH A.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/00; A63F3/04; A63F9/00; (IPC1-7): A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
RITCHISON LAW OFFICES, PC (115 EAST NINTH STREET - SUITE A, ANDERSON, IN, 46016-1507, US)
Claims:

What is claimed as new and desired to be protected by Letters Patent is:



1. A non-competitive and educational board game device for use by at least one player, comprising: (a) a playing game board surface divided into a plurality of predetermined spaces, each of the spaces being categorized into a plurality of activity types; (b) a token for each player to identify and track on which of the spaces the player is located; (c) a chance device for indicating a random number of spaces for the player to advance during the player's turn; (d) a plurality of cards that correspond to each of the activity types whereby the cards describe an interactive activity for the player to perform; and (e) a monitoring person to receive the performance of the player and to interact with the player whereby people with Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, Downs Syndrome and other disabilities can develop and improve their social skills.

2. The board game according to claim 1 wherein the activity categories include “What If?”, “Go Do!” and “Mirror” type activities.

3. The board game according to claim 1 wherein the game is simulated and played on a computer.

4. The board game according to claim 1 wherein the chance devices include a six-sided die, a spinner, and a bag of numbers.

5. The board game according to claim 1 wherein the activity categories are indicated on the game board by simple, geometric figures.

6. The board game according to claim 1 wherein the activity spaces are represented by simplified art in order to avoid distracting players from the activity cards and social skill improvements.

7. A method for developing and improving social skills in disabled people, comprising the steps of: (a) depicting a pathway on a game board which has categorized a plurality of activity spaces; (b) presenting a method to advance around the game board by a chance device; (c) providing tokens for players to indicate and track their respective location on the spaces of the game board; (d) providing activities for each of the activity spaces in order to permit the player to interact with the other players and monitoring person; and (e) permitting feedback from other players and the monitor to the player whereby the activity and feedback improve and enhance the social skills for people with Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, Downs Syndrome and other disabilities and help them to develop and improve their social skills.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/465,139, filed Apr. 24, 2004 by the present inventor and titled “SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER GAME”.

FIELD OF INVENTION

[0002] The present educational board game relates to the field of games used to improve behavior skills for children and adults with developmental disabilities. The features described in this board game will permit persons affected by these disabilities to navigate the unpredictable world that one faces with these disabilities. Specifically addressed are methods to address the impaired communications and social skills that this special group faces on a daily basis.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

[0003] Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

[0004] Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

FIELD OF INVENTION

[0005] The new board game described in this specification is an educational board game that is designed to help teach appropriate social skills, problem-solving, turn-taking, commenting, and peer interaction to children and adults with developmental disabilities.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A. INTRODUCTION OF THE PROBLEMS ADDRESSED

[0006] A DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY is a disability normally acquired prior to the age of twenty-two (22) years that affects cognitive, social, communication, and adaptive skills and behaviors. Some common developmental disabilities include: Mental Retardation, Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, Down's Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, and Spina Bifida.

[0007] This new board game likely will be especially useful in teaching better social interactions, problem-solving skills, and game-playing skills to individuals on the Autism Spectrum. Individuals on the Autism Spectrum are those people who have a diagnosis of Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, and/or Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Individuals with diagnoses of this spectrum suffer from impairments in the areas of communication, social interactions, and restricted/repetitive behaviors. It has been hypothesized that individuals on the Autism Spectrum have not developed Theory of Mind. Theory of Mind is simply the understanding and knowledge that others have thoughts and feelings different from their own. One reason this is so difficult for these individuals, is that they are unable to effectively read facial cues. Finally, individuals with Autism Spectrum disorders and Developmental Disabilities have significant problems in developing peer interactions and friendships.

B. PRIOR ART

[0008] Many avenues of developmental games are sought after to help people in general to improve their basic skills. These normally develop important skills in a fun and often competitive manner. However, the average development board game involves many pieces, intricate rules and scoring, and a competitive environment. Several of these are known for this purpose.

[0009] Examples of prior board game innovations begin with U.S. Pat. No. 1,635,734 issued to Ziegler (1927). This teaches an educational board game involving spaces and game pieces. Players advanced if they answered questions about history and people correctly and competed to reach the goal first. A U.S. Pat. No. 2,026,082 issued to Darrow (1935) teaches the well-known classical game of Monopoly. Here, a highly competitive game is presented with spaces, advancement by chance, activity cards, and money. Players learn trade and bartering in a real estate setting.

[0010] Other examples include a U.S. Pat. No. 3,782,009 issued to Darnell (1974) which teaches a behavior modification device. Here the device tracks classroom behavior and scholastic achievement of many individuals concurrently in a competitive manner. The device is open to the view of the participants and others for a long period of achievement tracking. A method and device U.S. Pat. No. 4,440,396 issued to Frudakis (1984) teaches a board game primarily to encourage adherence to a self improvement system, particularly a diet.

[0011] An educational and diagnostic tool is taught in U.S. Pat. No. 5,533,902 issued to Miller (1996). This tool focused on skills of matching, classifying and labeling does target disabled individuals for mainly visual feedback and manual manipulation and not social skills. A complex game in U.S. Pat. No. 5,882,008 issued to Siegesmund (1999) teaches a board game where players choose to answer subjective and objective questions. They compete to advance by correctly answering questions posed by cards that correlate to the game board spaces. Another U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,642 issued to Ziemba (1999) teaches a safety board game. The game involves intricate pieces, a fancy board setting and pa fantasy journey taken by players around a “town” depicted on the board. Players make a “stop or go” decision as they progress.

[0012] A complex game that teaches character and value development was issued in U.S. Pat. No. 6,120,028 to Boyer (2000). This game involves intricate pieces, critical thinking, and a journey around a town on the game board. It provides some interaction and examples of complex questions for players to answer. Another safety board game in U.S. Pat. No. 6,120,296 issued to Lim (2000) teaches a competitive educational board game. Players receive tokens for right answers and compete to exchange tokens for cards in order to collect enough cards to “win” the game. This is a difficult, highly complex board game.

[0013] A non-competitive memory game in U.S. Pat. No. 6,270,077 B1 issued to Cohen (2001) teaches a game focused on Alzheimer's patients and their basic memory enhancement. The board game focuses on cards that help players recall memories and facts. The cards are selected in correspondence with the type of specific things generally depicted by the game board spaces. Another board game protected by U.S. Pat. No. 6,398,222 B1 issued to Everett (2002) is aimed at developing and enhancing motor skills. It teaches this by having game pieces of various geometric shapes and focused primarily on physical therapeutic improvements.

[0014] Numerous innovations and improvements to developmental board games have been provided in prior art that are adapted to be used. However, even though these may be suitable for the specific purposes to which they address, they would not be suitable for developmental skill building for persons with disabilities. The present board game as described focuses on building skills with an organized method and game that has not heretofore been addressed by prior art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

SUMMARY

[0015] This new board game shows examples of at least two Social Skill Builder games specifically designed to address the developmental disabilities described in the above background. These games consist of fairly standard board game apparatus—a game board with a plurality of spaces, one or more player tokens and a manner to determine how many spaces to proceed. Corresponding to most of the spaces where a player “lands” are various cards of distinct types. The type of questions and directions on the cards permit a balanced and somewhat controlled reaction and interaction between the players themselves and the teacher or psychologist that is monitoring the activity.

[0016] The Social Skill Builder games are designed to be played using adult moderators and non-disabled peers. The non-disabled peers will serve as role-models for the disabled players, and playing the game is intended to help foster some friendships and better understanding between players. This use of non-disabled peers differs from many of the games used in the field today.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

[0017] Accordingly, there are several objects and advantages of the developmental board game. This new development game satisfies a long felt need to have a way to create opportunities to improve communication and social skills in short periods of time with controlled learning. The total time to set-up the game, create and use the learning session and to complete the game can be accomplished in thirty minutes. The attention span of some participants has prevented behavior skills building from being accomplished by other development games of past years.

[0018] This new board game is simple and inexpensive to manufacture. Because it is composed of easily adapted core cards, the need to specialize a game for an individual or small group is avoided. The similarities of the two examples shown below provide economies of scale during the manufacturing of the games.

[0019] This new board game, by the use of the mirror in Social Skill Builder Level I, assists in teaching an individual the ability to express and read facial cues. By having this ability, individuals on the Autism Spectrum are permitted to reduce the amount of errors they often make when interacting with others.

[0020] Another improvement to the behavior development game involves targeting special cards for the different age groups. Level I targets a younger set of developmentally disabled persons. Level II is targeted for older teens and adults.

[0021] Other advantages and additional features of the present board game will be more apparent from the accompanying drawings and from the full description of the board game. For one skilled in the art of development games for disabled persons it is readily understood that the features shown in the two examples with this board game are readily adapted to other similar type disabilities across varying age groups.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS—FIGURES

[0022] The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate embodiments of the present board game that are preferred. The drawings together with the summary description given above and a detailed description given below serve to explain the principles of the board game. It is understood, however, that the board game is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

[0023] Please Note that FIG. 1, FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 are Used in the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I.

[0024] FIG. 1 is top view of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I generally showing the game board.

[0025] FIG. 1A is a top view of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I “Game Board” that delineates the various spaces, the placement of the cards and the Start/Finish positions.

[0026] FIG. 2 shows the relationship between the various spaces and the corresponding deck of cards a player uses to determine his task to perform in SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I Game.

[0027] FIG. 3 shows an ordinary hand mirror that is used as part of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I Game.

[0028] Please Note that Apparatus and Table Shown in FIG. 4, FIG. 5 and FIG. 6 are Used in any of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER Games by the Players and the Teacher/Psychologist, without Regard to the Level.

[0029] FIG. 4 shows various types of “game pieces” or tokens that a player may use to mark his location during the game.

[0030] FIG. 5 shows a set of three different ways to determine how many spaces a player advances—by use of a die, a spinner or a bag with a series of numbers.

[0031] FIG. 6 is a table of the General Process used to complete any of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER Games by the players and the Teacher/Psychologist.

[0032] Please Note that FIG. 7 and FIG. 8 are Used in the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II.

[0033] FIG. 7 is a top view of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II “Game Board” that shows the various spaces, the placement of the cards and the Start/Finish positions.

[0034] FIG. 8 shows the relationship between the various spaces and the corresponding deck of cards a player uses to determine his task to perform in SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II Game.

[0035] Please Note that FIG. 9 and FIG. 10 ALTERNATIVE EMBODIMENTS OF THE SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I AND II.

[0036] FIG. 9 is a top view of an Alternative Embodiment of SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I “Game Board” that has simplified markings to delineate the various spaces.

[0037] FIG. 10 is a top view of an Alternative Embodiment of SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II “Game Board” that has simplified markings to delineate the various spaces.

[0038] FIG. 11 is a view of an Alternative Embodiment of SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL Game Board that has been incorporated a computerized version.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS—REFERENCE NUMERALS

[0039] The following list refers to the attaches drawings:

[0040] 21 game board for Level I

[0041] 21A simplified art—game board for Level I

[0042] 22 start space for all Levels

[0043] 23 go/do activity space for Level I

[0044] 23A simplified art—go/do activity space, Level I and II

[0045] 24 what if activity space for Level I and II

[0046] 24A simplified art—what if activity space, Level I and II

[0047] 25 mirror activity space for Level I

[0048] 26 free space for all Levels

[0049] 27 finish space for all Levels

[0050] 28 go/do card spot for Level I

[0051] 28A simplified art—go/do card spot for Level I

[0052] 29 what if card spot for Level I and II

[0053] 29A simplified art—what if card spot for Level I and II

[0054] 30 mirror card spot for Level I

[0055] 31 go/do cards for Level I

[0056] 31A simplified art—go/do cards for Level I (not shown)

[0057] 32 what if cards for Level I

[0058] 32A simplified art—what if cards for Level I (not shown)

[0059] 33 mirror cards for Level I

[0060] 34 hand mirror for Level I

[0061] 35A-G game pieces for Level I and II

[0062] 36 single dice piece for all Levels

[0063] 37 spinner mechanism for all Levels

[0064] 38 bag of numbered pieces for all Levels

[0065] 39 go/do activity space for Level II

[0066] 41 safety activity space for Level II

[0067] 42 go/do card spot for Level II

[0068] 44 safety card spot for Level II

[0069] 45 game board for level II

[0070] 45A simplified art—game board for level II

[0071] 56 go/do cards for Level II

[0072] 46A simplified art—go/do cards for Level II (not shown)

[0073] 47 what if cards for Level II

[0074] 47A simplified art—what if cards for Level II (not shown)

[0075] 48 safety cards for Level II

[0076] 49 computer terminal with interactive game

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS

[0077] The present board game is a SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER GAME that helps teach appropriate social skills, problem solving, turn-taking, commenting, and peer interaction to children and adults with developmental disabilities. The improvement over the existing art will be readily understood by those teachers or psychologists that work in this developmental area. The development game can be readily used with persons having varying degrees of developmental disabilities.

[0078] There are shown in FIGS. 1-11 complete operative embodiments of this board game. The board game generally relates to games consisting of fairly standard board game apparatus—a game board with several spaces, player tokens and a manner to determine how many spaces to proceed. However, the novelty and key to the usefulness in developing impaired persons are the method used in monitoring the game and the distinct types of the various cards corresponding to most of the spaces where a player “lands” during the operation of the game.

[0079] The preferred embodiments of the board game consist of a few parts shown in the accompanying drawings.

[0080] FIG. 1 is a top view of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I generally showing the game board.

[0081] FIG. 1A is a top view of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I “Game Board” that delineates the various spaces, the placement of the cards and the Start/Finish positions. The Game Board 21, which is shown, is a substantially rigid member having a substantially flat playing surface and a rectangular shape. The board 21 can be constructed so as to fold into a smaller shape, for instance in half, or quarters or to comprise part or all of a section of a box containing the entirety of the board game. As shown in FIG. 1A, the board is laid out open and substantially flat.

[0082] An example might be one of thirty-four (34) spaces showing the complete course. There is one START/FINISH space 22 and thirty three other labeled spaces. The labeled spaces include distinct types of activity spaces like

[0083] In FIG. 1A, the example game board 21 shown is comprised of a plurality of spaces with several distinct types. An example might be one thirty-four (34) spaces showing the complete course. There is one START/FINISH space 22 and thirty three other labeled spaces. The labeled spaces could include

[0084] a.) twelve (12) GREEN activity spaces—“Go Do!” 23.

[0085] b.) twelve (12) ORANGE activity spaces—“What If” 24.

[0086] c.) six (6) WHITE activity spaces—“Mirror” 25. And

[0087] d.) three (3) FREE spaces 26.

[0088] In the Start Space 22, along one edge, is shown the FINISH line 27. One skilled in the art appreciates the total number of spaces, the number of differentiated types of spaces (Green, Orange, White and Free) and the respective number of each type may vary without effecting the scope and spirit of the development game.

[0089] Interior to the course spaces (that are on the perimeter of the game board) are distinct card location “spots” identified like the distinct card types for placing the respective decks of cards used in the operation of the game. The example shows a GREEN card spot “Go Do!” 28; an ORANGE card spot “What If?” 29; and a WHITE card spot “Mirror” 30.

[0090] FIG. 2 shows the relationship between the various labeled spaces, the card spots and the corresponding decks of cards a player uses to determine his/her task to perform in SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I Game. Each color-coded space and card spot has a unique corresponding deck of cards that contains the task for one to perform if or when he/she has landed on that specific colored space. An example correspondence is shown in the following table. 1

TABLE A
Correspondence of Spaces, Spots and Task Decks
Level I - Board 21
Color
GREENORANGEWHITE
CourseGo Do!, 23What If?, 24Mirror, 25
Activity Space
Game BoardSpot, 28Spot, 29Spot, 30
Interior Spot
Deck of CardsDeck, 31Deck, 32Deck, 33

[0091] Examples of the various tasks for SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I Game are shown in the following table. 2

TABLE B
Examples of Level I Tasks by Card Type
GO DO!-GREENWHAT IF?-ORANGEMIRROR-WHITE
Say 1 thing that makesIf you bump intoLook in the
you feel happy.someone in line, whatmirror and
should you say?introduce
yourself.
Give someone else aIf you don't understandMake a sad face
compliment.how to do your schoolin the mirror.
work what should you
do?
Say 1 thing it would beHow would you feel ifMake a mad face
ok to do if you weresomeone said, “You arein the mirror.
mad.stupid?
Say something you likeIf you want to playMake a tired face
about someone elsewith other kids atin the mirror.
playing the game.recess, what should you
do?
Tell someone thank youIf you saw someoneMake a happy face
for playing this gamecrying, what could youin the mirror.
with you.do to help?
Ask someone what theirIf you feel mad orLook in the
favorite color is.upset, you should saymirror and make
     .the face you
should when
someone says
“Hi!” to you.
Say 1 way it would beIf you see someone whoAsk someone to
ok to ask for a BREAK.you think needs to bemake a face.
on a diet, should youMake the same
tell them? Why or Whyface in the
not?mirror and say
what kind of face
it is.
Introduce yourself toWhat should you say ifAsk someone to
someone.you accidentally hurtmake a face.
someone's feelings?Make the same
face in the
mirror and say
what kind of face
it is.
Ask someone what theirIf a stranger knocks onAsk someone to
favorite thing to doyour door at home, whatmake a face.
is.should you do?Make the same
face in the
mirror and say
what kind of face
it is.
Tell someone 1 thingIf it gets too loud forLook in the
you did today.you, what can you do?mirror and
SMILE.
Look in the
mirror and
FROWN.
Do these
look different?
Say 1 thing that makesIf you know the answerLook in the
you mad.to a question inmirror and say 2
school, what should youthings about your
do?face.
Show how you wouldIf you're not sureLook in the
ask someone to playabout saying somethingmirror and say 1
with you.that might hurt someonething you like
else's feelings, whatabout yourself.
should you do?
Ask someone what theirIf you do not win thisLook in the
favorite food is.game, what should youmirror and say 2
say to the person whothings about
does?your face.
Ask someone what theirIf someone is teasingLook in the
favorite movie is.you at school, whatmirror and think
should you do?about something
you like. How
does your face
look?
Name 2 things you canIf someone is playingMake a SCARED
do to help yourselfwith something that youface in the
Feel calm.want what should youmirror.
do?

[0092] FIG. 3 shows an ordinary hand mirror 34 that is used as part of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I Game. The mirror provides immediate feedback on facial cues when used with tasks directed from Mirror cards from deck 33 described above.

[0093] FIG. 4 shows various types of “game pieces” or tokens that a player may use to mark his location during the game. These are several representative types of pieces or tokens 35A through 35G in the illustration.

[0094] FIG. 5 shows a set of three different ways to determine how many spaces a player advances—by use of a single die 36, a spinner 37 or a bag with a series of numbers 38. Any suitable chance determining element may be provided for the operation of the game. Those represented are illustrative and not limiting in nature.

[0095] FIG. 6 is a table of the General Process used to complete any of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER Games by the players and the Teacher/Psychologist, without regard to the Level. It serves again as illustrative and not limiting in the steps shown for any Level of the board game.

[0096] FIG. 7 is a top view of the SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II “Game Board” that shows the various spaces, the placement of the cards and the Start/Finish positions. The Game Board 45, which is shown, is a substantially rigid member having a substantially flat playing surface and a rectangular shape. The board can be constructed so as to fold into a smaller shape, for instance in half, in quarters, or to comprise part or all of a section of a box containing the entirety of the board game. As shown in FIG. 7, the board is laid out open and substantially flat.

[0097] In FIG. 7, the example game board 45 shown is comprised of a plurality of spaces with several distinct types. An example might be one of thirty-four (34) spaces showing the complete course. There is one START/FINISH space 22 and thirty three other labeled spaces. The labeled spaces include distinct types of activity spaces like

[0098] e.) twelve (12) GREEN activity spaces—“Go Do!” 39.

[0099] f.) twelve (12) ORANGE activity spaces—“What If” 24.

[0100] g.) six (6) WHITE activity spaces—“WHITE WITH RED CROSS” 41. and,

[0101] h.) three (3) FREE spaces 26.

[0102] In the start space 22, along one edge, is shown the FINISH line 27. One skilled in the art appreciates the total number of spaces, the number of differentiated types of spaces (Green, Orange, White, and Free) and the respective number of each type may vary without effecting the scope and spirit of the development game.

[0103] Interior to the course spaces (that are on the perimeter of the game board) are three distinct card spots for placing the decks of cards used in the operation of the game. These are GREEN card spot “Go Do!” 42; ORANGE card spot “What If?” 29; and WHITE card spot “White with Red Cross” 44.

[0104] FIG. 8 shows the relationship between the various spaces and the corresponding deck of cards a player uses to determine his task to perform in SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II Game. Each color-coded space and card spot has a unique corresponding deck of cards that contains the task for one to perform if or when he/she has landed on that specific colored space. The example correspondence is shown in the following table. 3

TABLE C
Correspondence of Spaces, Spots and Task Decks
Level II - Board 45
Color
GREENORANGEWHITE
CourseGo Do!, 39What If?, 24Red Cross, 41
Activity Space
Game BoardSpot, 42Spot, 29Spot, 44
Interior Spot
Deck of CardsDeck, 46Deck, 47Deck, 48

[0105] Examples of the various tasks for SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II Game are shown in the following table. 4

TABLE D
Examples of Level II Tasks by Card Type
GREENORANGESAFETY
Say 1 thing thatIf you bump intoIf someone wants you
makes you happy.someone in line, whatto do something you
should you say?know is wrong, what
should you do?
Give someone else aIf you meet someoneIf you smell gas in
compliment.new what should youthe house, name 2
say? things you
should do.
Say 1 thing it wouldHow would you feel ifIf your smoke alarm
be ok to do if yousomeone said, “Yourgoes off during the
were mad.hair looks weird”?night, what should
you do?
Say something youIf you saw someoneIf someone you just
like about someonecrying, what could youmet offers you a
else playing thisdo?ride in their car,
game.should you go?
Say 2 things thatIf someone teases youIf there is a
you are good at.or calls you names,tornado warning and
what should you do?you are at home,
where should you go?
Ask someone whatIf someone saysIf someone knocks on
their favorite foodsomething that hurtsyour door, what
is.your feelings, whatshould you do?
should you say?
Tell something youIf you see someone whoIf someone at work
have done nice forneeds to be on a diet,touches you
someone.should you tell them?inappropriately,
Why or Why not?what should you do?
Introduce yourselfWhat should you say ifIf you want to try a
to someone.you accidentally hurtdrink of alcohol,
someone's feelings?but take-other
medicine, what
should you do?
Ask someone whatIf someone hasIf your electricity
their favorite thingsomething you want,goes out, what
to do is.what should you do?should you do?
Tell someone 1 thingIf you see someoneIf a stranger comes
you did today.whose clothes don'tto your door and
match, should you tellwants to use your
them? Why or Why not?phone, what should
you do?
Say 1 thing thatIf someone wants you toIf you are alone and
makes you feel mad.do something you don'tstart to feel sick,
want to do, what shouldwhat should you do?
you say?
Say 2 goals you haveIf you're not sureIf a friend offers
for yourself.about saying somethingyou some of their
that might hurt someonemedicine, should you
else's feelings, whattake it?
should you do?
Ask someone whatIf it gets too loud,If someone tries to
their favorite moviewhat can you do?talk you into going
is.somewhere you don't
want to go, what
should you say?
Say 2 things you canIf you do not win thisIf you notice there
do if you have togame, what should youis only 1 pill left
wait in the doctor'ssay?in your daily
office.medicine bottle,
what should you do?
Ask someone 2If someone asks toIf you aren't sure
questions aboutborrow money from you,if something in your
themselves.but they have neverrefrigerator is
paid you back before,spoiled, what should
what should you say?you do?
Say one way it wouldIf you meet someone youIf someone you just
be OK to ask for awant to ask on a date,met asks for your
BREAK.what should you say?address, should you
tell them?
Say 2 things youIf you want moreName 2 things you
like about yourself.independence, nameshould always do
something you can workbefore crossing the
on getting better at.street.
Name 2 things youIf someone makes aIf someone calls on
can do to helpmistake, should youthe phone and asks
yourself feel calm.always correct them?you to buy
WHY or WHY NOT?something, what
should you say?
Practice invitingIf you have a problemIf someone hits you
someone to a partyyou are having troubleor tries to hurt
or a dance.solving, what shouldyou, what
you do?should you do?
Tell something thatIf you don't understandIf something catches
someone has donewhat your boss or staffon fire while you
nice for you.wants you to do, whatare cooking, what
should you say?should you do?

[0106] FIG. 9 is a top view of an Alternative Embodiment of SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I “Game Board” that has simplified markings to delineate the various spaces. In FIG. 9, the example game board 21A is generally the same as the board 21 in FIG. 1 except the artwork is simplified. Some autistic and otherwise disabled persons may be somewhat distracted by figures and pictures. These divert part of the attention from the development questions on the cards. Therefore, this alternative embodiment maintains a color coded and geometric pattern to differentiate the activity space for “Go Do!” 23A and space for “What if?” 24A. Likewise, the spots for the cards have simplified artwork as “Go Do!” spot 28A and “What if?” spot 29A. Similarly, the actual activity cards “Go Do!” 31A and “What if?” 32A have the simplified artwork. The questions are the same as in the Preferred Level I embodiment described above in Table B. Note also, the Mirror designation is maintained the same (activity space 25, card spot 30 and card deck 33) for the Preferred Level I and the alternative embodiment with the simplified artwork Level I. The balance of the alternative embodiment description matches the above description for the Level I development game. 5

TABLE E
Correspondence of Spaces, Spots and Task Decks
Level I Simplified Artwork - Board 21A
Color
GREENORANGEWHITE
CourseGo Do!, 23AWhat If?, 24AMirror, 25
Activity Space
Game BoardSpot, 28ASpot, 29ASpot, 30
Interior Spot
Deck of CardsDeck, 31ADeck, 32ADeck, 33

[0107] FIG. 10 is a top view of an Alternative Embodiment of SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II “Game Board” that has simplified markings to delineate the various spaces. In FIG. 10, the example game board 45A is generally the same as the board 45 in FIG. 7 except the artwork is simplified. As with in the simplified artwork Level I description, some autistic and otherwise disabled persons may be somewhat distracted by figures and pictures. These divert part of the attention from the development questions on the cards. Therefore, this alternative embodiment maintains a color coded and geometric pattern to differentiate the activity space for “Go Do!” 23A and space for “What if?” 24A. Likewise, the spots for the cards have simplified artwork as “Go Do!” spot 28A and “What if?” spot 29A. These are the same for both Level I and II games with the simplified artwork. Similarly, the actual activity cards “Go Do!” 46A and “What if?” 47A have the simplified artwork. The questions are the same as in the Preferred Level II embodiment described above in Table D. Note also, the Red Cross Safety designation is maintained the same (activity space 41, card spot 44 and card deck 48) for the Preferred Level II and the alternative embodiment with the simplified artwork Level II. The balance of the alternative embodiment description matches the above description for the Level II development game. 6

TABLE F
Correspondence of Spaces, Spots and Task Decks
Level II Simplified Artwork - Board 45A
Color
GREENORANGEWHITE
CourseGo Do!, 23AWhat If?, 24ARed Cross, 41
Activity Space
Game BoardSpot, 28ASpot, 29ASpot, 44
Interior Spot
Deck of CardsDeck, 46ADeck, 47ADeck, 48

[0108] FIG. 11 is a view of an Alternative Embodiment of SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL Game Board that has been incorporated in a computerized version. Here all the described methods and interaction are accomplished by a monitored game that is completed on a computer terminal 49. Note that the players may be at different locations, however a monitor or teacher needs to support the respective players interaction and skill building as the player performs the various activities prescribed. One skilled in the art appreciates the method to progress around the virtual game board and select the activities may be accomplished within the spirit and scope of this new skill building game.

[0109] The details mentioned here are exemplary and not limiting. Other components specific to describing a Social Skill Builder Game for development of disabled persons may be added as a person having ordinary skill in the field of this board game well appreciates. The drawing and components have been focused on the added and reconfigured parts in respect to the present board game.

OPERATION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0110] The rules and play of the developmental board game apparatus illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 11 will now be explained.

SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER GAME LEVEL I

[0111] Object:

[0112] The object of the game is for a player to complete a round of the game board 21 from START 22 to FINISH 27.

[0113] Players:

[0114] Two to four (2-4) players may play a game at a time. One Adult moderator is needed to supervise, to encourage commenting and turn-taking, to read Orange Card questions, and to make judgments pertaining to answers of the player throughout the game. The recommended player age is six to twelve (6 to 12) years of age.

[0115] RULES/METHODOLOGY of Playing the Game:

[0116] Players and Adult moderator sit around the board game. The three (3) decks of cards (Green, Orange, and White) are placed face down in L-the designated card deck spaces (Green 28, Orange 29, or White 30) in the middle of the game board. Each player selects a game piece and places this on the space marked “START” 22. Each player takes a turn rolling the die 36 or using another device similar to those shown in FIG. 5. The player with the highest number goes first, followed by the player with the second highest number, etc. After the player rolls the die 36, he/she moves that many spaces on the game board in a clock-wise manner.

[0117] If the player lands on a space marked with “GREEN” 23, that player draws the top GREEN card from the deck 31. If the player is able to read the card themselves, this should be encouraged. If the player is unable to read, the Adult moderator should read the card. The player should then attempt to perform the action outlined on the GREEN card he/she has drawn. Prior to beginning the game, a decision should be made if the player must make GREEN card actions toward every player playing the game or just to one player he/she selects per turn.

[0118] If the player lands on a space marked with “ORANGE” 24, he/she should select the top card from the ORANGE card deck 32 and hand it to the Adult moderator. The Adult moderator should read the question to the player. The player will need to try to provide an appropriate/acceptable answer to the question asked. The Adult moderator will determine if this is a correct response.

[0119] If the player lands on a “WHITE” space 25 marked with a picture of a mirror, he/she should select the top card from the WHITE MIRROR card deck 33. If the player is able to read the card themselves, this should be encouraged. If the player is unable to read, the Adult moderator should read the card. The player should then obtain the hand mirror and attempt to perform the action on the MIRROR card he/she has drawn. (*Periodically, it might be beneficial for the Adult moderator to take a picture of the child performing the expressions in the mirror to help model and reinforce various emotions and facial expressions.)

[0120] If a player lands on a “FREE” space 26, they will be able to choose from which deck (GREEN 31, ORANGE 32, or WHITE 33,) to draw their card for that turn.

[0121] In all the cases shown above, if a player draws a card in which they are unable to answer the question or perform the action/instruction, they should remain on that game board space and wait until it is their turn again. They should then draw another card from the same card deck from which they drew the last time and were unable to answer the question or perform the task. A question must be answered correctly or an instruction/action performed correctly before the player is permitted to roll the die again.

[0122] The preferred embodiment of the Social Skill Builder Game LEVEL II will now be presented. The full text is similar to that of LEVEL I above, but there are specific changes reflected for the older Players, especially with the card contents of tasks to complete. The repetition is therefore merited to completely explain the embodiment of a LEVEL II game.

SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER GAME LEVEL II

[0123] Object:

[0124] The object of the game is for a player to complete a round of the game board 45 from START 22 to FINISH 27.

[0125] Players:

[0126] Two to four (2-4) players may play a game at a time. One Adult moderator is needed to supervise, to encourage commenting and turn-taking, to read Orange Card questions, and to make judgments pertaining to answers of the player throughout the game. The recommended player age is fifteen (15) through Adult.

[0127] RULES/METHODOLOGY of Playing the Game:

[0128] Players and Adult moderator sit around the board game. The three (3) decks of cards (Green, Orange, and White) are placed face down in the designated card deck spaces (Green 42, Orange 29, or White 44) in the middle of the game board. Each player selects a game piece and places this on the space marked “START” 22. Each player takes a turn-rolling the die 36 or using another device similar to those shown in FIG. 5. The player with the highest number goes first, followed by the player with the second highest number, etc. After the player rolls the die 36, he/she moves that many spaces on the game board in a clock-wise manner.

[0129] If the player lands on a space marked with “GREEN” 39, that player draws the top GREEN card from the deck 46. If the player is able to read the card themselves, this should be encouraged. If the player is unable to read, the Adult moderator should read the card. The player should then attempt to perform the action outlined on the GREEN card he/she has drawn. Prior to beginning the game, a decision should be made if the player must make GREEN card actions toward every player playing the game or just to one player he/she selects per turn.

[0130] If the player lands on a space marked with “ORANGE” 24, he/she should select the top card from the ORANGE card deck 47 and hand it to the Adult moderator. The Adult moderator should read the question to the player. The player will need to try to provide an appropriate/acceptable answer to the question asked. The Adult moderator will determine if this is a correct response.

[0131] If the player lands on a “WHITE” space 41 marked with a picture of a WHITE CROSS, he/she should select the top card from the SAFETY card deck 48. If the player is able to read the card themselves, this should be encouraged. If the player is unable to read, the Adult moderator should read the card. The player should then attempt to perform the action on the SAFETY card he/she has drawn.

[0132] If a player lands on a “FREE” space 26, they will be able to choose from which deck (GREEN 46, ORANGE 47, or WHITE 48) to draw their card for that turn.

[0133] In all the cases shown above, if a player draws a card in which they are unable to answer the question or perform the action/instruction, they should remain on that game board square and wait until it is their turn again. They should then draw another card from the same card deck from which they drew the last time and were unable to answer the question or perform the task. A question must be answered correctly or an instruction/action performed correctly before the player is permitted to roll the die again.

[0134] In both of the preferred embodiments—SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL I game and SOCIAL SKILL BUILDER LEVEL II game the time to complete a session will vary from thirty minutes to that amount of time allowed by the Adult monitor. The session ends when the allotted time is completed or one of the players crosses the finish line. However, it is paramount to understand that this is not a competitive game, rather a game with the specific intent to promote participation and interaction of the players. Through that interaction, the social and communication skills have specific focus for the individual players and an opportunity for that specific player to develop improvements. The alternative embodiments shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 are played essentially the same as described in the above rules. The primary difference is the simplified artwork to reduce diversion of the players attention from the activities being performed.

[0135] The board game of the present board game has been shown and described as including a pre-printed game boards 21, 21A, 45 and 45A. Even though a simple board game is illustrated, it should be understood that the board game could be modified to play this electronically on a computer or across the Internet. This alternative is shown in FIG. 11 and uses a computer terminal 49. This would still require the game to be properly monitored by an adult. Even as an electronic version the game could still operate within the scope of the board game. One skilled in the art appreciates that as computer laptops, hand-held, mobile telephones, and other electronic methods advance, similar devices may be used to accomplish the interactive skill development expressed by the methods used with this board game.