Title:
Cylindrical golf club
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf club having a cylindrical body (12) with a first end (14), a second end (16) and a centroid-located shaft bore (22). Into the first end (14) is inserted a putting insert (34) or a driving insert (74), and into the second end (16) is inserted respectively a putting-practice insert (42) or a second, non-striking insert (76). At the centroid of the cylindrical cylinder (12) is inserted a shaft attachment insert (26) having a shaft cavity (28) that is in alignment with the shaft bore (22) located on the cylindrical body (12). Into the shaft bore (22) and the shaft cavity (28) is inserted and attached a shaft (50) that is angled outward when using the driving insert (74). The circular cross-section of the putting insert (32) produces a larger “sweet spot”. Therefore, if the golf ball is struck off-center, the deviation from a projected staight line is minimized.



Inventors:
Lee, Dong Hwi (Whittier, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/482247
Publication Date:
09/30/2004
Filing Date:
12/23/2003
Assignee:
LEE DONG HWI
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B53/04; A63B69/36; (IPC1-7): A63B53/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HUNTER, ALVIN A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PATENT LAW INC (5460 WHITE OAK AVE SUITE A-331, ENCINO, CA, 91316, US)
Claims:
1. A golf club comprising: a) a cylindrical body having a first end and a second end, b) a first insert having an outer surface and an integral inner section, wherein the inner section is dimensioned to frictionally fit into the first end and to be attached thereto by an attachment means, c) a second insert having an outer surface and an integral inner section, wherein the inner section is dimensioned to frictionally fit into the first end and to be attached thereto by an attachment means, and d) an upward extending shaft having means for being attached to the centroid of said cylindrical body.

2. The golf club as specified in claim 1 wherein said cylindrical body is constructed of high impact plastic.

3. The golf club as specified in claim 1 wherein said cylindrical body is constructed of metal.

4. The golf club as specified in claim 2 wherein said first insert comprises a Putting insert, with the outer surface having a flat face.

5. The golf club as specified in claim 2 wherein said second insert comprises a putting-practice insert, with the outer surface having an inward taper that terminates with a truncated flat tip.

6. The golf club as specified in claim 2 wherein said second insert comprises a putting-practice insert, with the outer surface having a flat face wherefrom its center protrudes outward a rod having a flat terminus.

7. The golf club as specified in claim 2 wherein said second insert comprises a putting-practice insert, wherein the outer surface is convex.

8. The golf club as specified in claim 2 wherein said first insert comprises a driving insert, having an outer surface with a substantially elliptical shape having a downward extending slope, and the second insert having an outer surface with a substantially flat face.

9. The golf club as specified in claim 2 further comprising a shaft attachment insert that is inserted into and attached to the substantive center of said cylindrical body.

10. The golf club as specified in claim 9 wherein said cylindrical body having a centered shaft bore and said shaft attachment insert having a shaft cavity that is in alignment with the centered shaft bore, wherein into the bore and the cavity is insert and attached, by an attachment means, said shaft.

11. The golf club as specified in claim 10 wherein when said golf club is configured as a golf putter, wherein said shaft extends upward and is normal to the longitudinal and lateral axes of said cylindrical body.

12. The golf club as specified in claim 10 wherein when said golf club is configured as a golf driver, wherein said shaft extends upward and normal to the longitudinal axis of said cylindrical body and is angled inward from the lateral axis.

13. The golf club as specified in claim 2 wherein when said cylindrical body is configured with said golf putting inserts said cylindrical body has: a) a preferred length of 4.5 inches (11.43 cm), b) a preferred outside diameter of 1.5 inches (3.81 cm), and c) a wall thickness ranging from 0.16 inches (0.041 cm) to 0.125 inches (0.318 cm).

14. The golf club as specified in claim 1 wherein the upper edges of the first and second ends of said cylindrical body are radiused.

15. The golf club as specified in claim 9 wherein said shaft attachment insert is made of a light weight material.

16. The golf club as specified in claim 15 wherein said shaft attachment insert is made of wood.

17. The golf club as specified in claim 16 wherein the shaft attachment insert further comprises an axial bore therethrough to reduce the weight of said shaft attachment insert.

18. The golf club as specified in claim 2 wherein said first and second inserts are constructed of metal.

19. The golf club as specified in claim 18 wherein said insert metal is brass.

20. The golf club as specified in claim 2 wherein said first and second inserts are constructed of an outer shell that is filled with a high-density metal.

21. The golf club as specified in claim 14 wherein said means for attaching said first and second inserts comprises said inserts having a stepped-down inner edge that interfaces with the respective first end or second end of said cylindrical body.

22. The golf club as specified in claim 1 wherein said means for attaching said first and second inserts comprises an adhesive that is placed around the interfacing surfaces of said inserts and said cylindrical body.

23. The golf club as specified in claim 1 wherein said means for attaching said inserts and said shaft to said cylindrical body comprises cooling the inserts and shaft prior to inserting and allowing same to return to room temperature.

24. The golf club as specified in claim 10 wherein said means for attaching said shaft into the centered shaft bore comprises: a) the shaft cavity on said shaft attachment insert having a set of internal threads, and b) the lower section of said shaft having a set of corresponding external threads dimensioned to be threaded into the threads on the shaft cavity.

25. The golf club as specified in claim 1 wherein said means for attaching said shaft comprises an adhesive.

26. A golf club designed to function as a golf putter comprising: a) a cylindrical body having: (1) a first end, (2) a second end, (3) lower section, (4) upper section, and (5) a longitudinally centered shaft bore that penetrates the upper section of said cylindrical body, and wherein the upper Edges of the first and second ends are radiused, b) a shaft attachment insert having a shaft cavity, and a diameter dimensioned to frictionally fit into said cylindrical body, wherein said insert having means for being attached and located at the centroid of said cylindrical body, with the shaft cavity in alignment with the centered shaft bore on the upper section of said cylindrical body, c) a putting insert having an outer flat face, an inner substantially flat surface, and a diameter dimensioned to frictionally fit into the first end of said cylindrical body, wherein said insert having means for being attached to said cylindrical body with the outer flat face positioned flush with the first end of said cylindrical body, d) a putting-practicing insert having an outer section that tapers inward and terminates with a truncated flat tip, and an inner section having a substantially flat surface and having a diameter dimensioned to frictionally fit into the second end of said cylindrical body, wherein said insert having means for being attached to said cylindrical body with the beginning of the tapered outer section positioned flush with the second end of said cylindrical body, wherein the weight normally included in the spaces between said putting insert and said putting-practice inserts is applied respectfully to said inserts, wherein the weighted said inserts allow said golf putter to have improved momentum, and, e) an upward extending shaft having an upper gripping section, a center section, and a lower section, with the lower section having means for being attached to the centered shaft bore and the shaft bore cavity, normal to the longitudinal and lateral axes of said cylindrical body.

27. A golf club designed to function as a golf driver comprising: a) a cylindrical body having: (1) a first end, (2) a second end, (3) lower section, (4) upper section, and (5) a longitudinally centered shaft bore that penetrates the upper section of said cylindrical body at an angle, and wherein the first and second ends are radiused, b) a shaft attachment insert having an angled shaft cavity, and a diameter dimensioned to frictionally fit into said cylindrical body, wherein said insert having means for being attached and located at the centroid of said cylindrical body, with the angled shaft cavity in alignment with the centered and angled shaft bore on the upper section of said cylindrical body, c) a first insert configured as a driving insert having an outer surface and an integral inner section, wherein the outer surface has a substantially elliptical shape having a downward extending slope, and the inner section is dimensioned to be inserted and attached, by an attachment means, into the first end of said cylindrical body, d) a second non-striking insert having a flat outer surface and an integral inner section, wherein the inner section is dimensioned to be inserted and attached, by an attachment means, into the second end of said cylindrical body, wherein the weight normally included in the spaces between said first and said second inserts is applied respectfully to said inserts, wherein the weighted said inserts allow said golf driver to have improved momentum, and e) a shaft having an upper gripping section, a centered section, and a lower section, with the lower section having means for being attached to the angled shaft bore and the angled shaft cavity.

28. The golf club as specified in claim 27 wherein said shaft is placed at an angle that is between 50-degrees and 65-degrees.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0001] The invention generally pertains to golf clubs and more particularly, to a cylindrically-shaped golf putter and golf driver with each designed to improve the club's momentum and to have a decreased face surface area for both determination and acquisition of the club's sweet spot.

BACKGROUND ART

[0002] One of the most popular sports throughout the world is golf with people of all ages and backgrounds enjoying the game. Golf has always been a competitive sport, but with many new players, especially professional, the competition has grown.

[0003] While some people may think that golf is an easy sport to play, merely consisting of hitting a ball with a club into a hole, it is actually difficult, requiring substantial skill to play the game. Although it is true that the game does consist of hitting a ball into a hole, there are many variations of this action. The three main segments of playing golf are teeing off, which is the first time the golfer will hit the ball to each hole; driving, which comprises however many subsequent times the ball must be hit to arrive at the “green”; and putting, which is actually hitting the ball into the hole. A driver is used, after teeing off, to drive the ball onto the green area.

[0004] There are several driver designs which are configured and angled to best hit the ball onto the green area. The driver design disclosed herein can be made to accommodate the various driver angles required to optimize the distance of the drive and to overcome the surroundings that must be avoided to reach the green, at which time the putter is utilized.

[0005] A conventional putter consists of a shaft having at its lower end a flat, wedge-shaped head, with the putting face comprising the longitudinal, inner surface of the head. Located at the center of the putting face is the “sweet spot”. The single most difficult aspect of putting is determining and acquiring the sweet spot. When the ball is struck correctly it will travel in the desired straight path toward the hole. Any deviation from the sweet spot, even by a minute amount, will cause the ball to deviate from its projected trajectory.

[0006] If there was some way of providing better determination and acquisition of the sweet spot during driving and putting, it could substantially increase a player's ability to perform well on every drive and putt, thus improving the entire game.

[0007] A search of the prior art did not disclose any patents that read directly on the claims of the instant invention, however, the following U.S. patents are considered related: 1

PATENT NO.INVENTORISSUED
D367,093Weir13 Feb. 1996
3,472,512Berry14 Oct. 1969
3,399,898Burkland 3 Sep. 1968

[0008] The D367,093 patent discloses a design for a croquet mallet having a circular striking section attached normal to a circular handle.

[0009] The U.S. Pat. No. 3,472,512 patent discloses a mallet assembly having a cylindrical section to which is attached, on both ends, a ball-striking insert each having a central rod-cavity. Through the upper section of the cylindrical section is located a handle sleeve having a lower end that terminates against a bar-stop. The sleeve includes a central rod bore that is in alignment with a handle bore when a handle is inserted into the sleeve. To maintain the handle a rod is inserted into the central rod bore with the ends of the rod inserted into the respective central rod-cavity.

[0010] The U.S. Pat. No. 3,399,898 patent discloses a golf putter that is constructed of a solid structure having a putting face. The putting face is in a true plane that extends normal to the axis of the putter head and parallel to the axis of the putter head.

DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION

[0011] Whenever a person is playing golf, it is very important to strike the golf ball at the golf club's “sweet spot”, which is located at the exact center of the club head's face. Any deviation from the center by even a few millimeters can cause the golf ball to travel in an unwanted direction. This is especially true for puts, when the golf ball typically remains on the green and travels a considerably shorter distance than when teeing off or driving. Most conventional golf putters and golf drivers are designed with a flat, wedge-shaped head, with the putting face comprising the longitudinal, inner surface of the head. This design makes it difficult to aim and to determine and acquire the sweet spot, especially when using the putter.

[0012] The golf putter and the golf driver of the instant invention, in its most basic design comprises a cylindrical body having a first end and a second end. In the golf putter design, a putting insert is inserted into the first end and into the second end is inserted a putting-practice insert. In the golf driver design a driving insert is inserted into the first end and a non ball-striking insert is inserted into the second end. In both designs, the momentum of the golf club is significantly improved. The putting-practice insert, in a preferred design, has a face with an inward taper that terminates with a truncated tip. The truncated tip corresponds to the insert's sweet spot, which allows a person using the putting-practice insert to determine and acquire the sweet spot for every putt. A shaft extends upward from the centroid of the cylindrical body. Within the cylindrical body is a shaft attachment insert, which maintains the shaft securely attached to the body.

[0013] In view of the above disclosure, the primary object of the invention is to provide: 1) a golf putter having an improved momentum, and with the area of the club's face decreased to allow a person using the club to better determine and acquire the club's sweet spot, and 2) a golf driver that is designed to have a maximum momentum.

[0014] It is also an object of the invention to provide a golf club that:

[0015] the golf putter includes both a putting face and a putting practicing face on a single structure,

[0016] the golf putter can significantly improve a person's ability to putt with greater accuracy, by aiming the putter through the cylinders longitudinal axis,

[0017] can be constructed of a variety of materials to provide a golf club of different weight and elastic characteristics to maximize its momentum,

[0018] can be made to be used by either a left handed or a right handed golfer,

[0019] can be sold individually or as a part of a set of golf clubs, and

[0020] is cost effective from both a manufacturer's and consumer's point of view.

[0021] These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the subsequent detailed description of the preferred embodiment and the appended claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0022] FIG. 1 is a side-sectional view of the golf putter showing the relative locations, within a cylindrical body, of a putting insert, a putting-practice insert, and a shaft attachment insert into which is inserted a shaft.

[0023] FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the golf putter's cylindrical body with the shaft attachment insert having a shaft cavity and an axial bore. The putting insert and the putting-practice insert are not shown.

[0024] FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the golf putter.

[0025] FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of a putting-practice insert having a flat face wherefrom its center protrudes outward a ball-striking rod.

[0026] FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of a putting-practice insert having a convex striking surface.

[0027] FIG. 6 is a side sectional view showing a golf putter having a putting insert and a putting-practice insert that each have a stepped-down inner edge that interfaces with the respective ends of the cylindrical body.

[0028] FIG. 7 is a partial side elevational view showing an alternate method for attaching the shaft to the cylindrical body utilizing a set of complimentary threads.

[0029] FIG. 8 is an illustration showing the angular deviation φ that occurs when the ball is struck by an off-center distance.

[0030] FIG. 9 is a side elevational-sectional view of a golf driver showing the relative locations, within a cylindrical body, of a first insert configured as a driving insert, a second insert and a shaft attachment insert into which is angularly attached a shaft.

[0031] FIG. 10 is an end view showing the substantially elliptical shape of the driving insert.

[0032] FIG. 11 is a top plan view of the driving insert.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING THE INVENTION

[0033] The best mode for carrying out the invention is presented in terms of a golf club 10 that is disclosed in further terms of a preferred embodiment for a golf putter 10A and a golf driver 10B. The golf putter 10A, which is described first, is shown in FIGS. 1-8 and the golf driver 10B is shown in FIGS. 9-11.

[0034] Conventional golf putters utilize a design that is comprised of a flat, wedge-shaped putter head with the putting face being the longitudinal inner surface of the head. When using a golf putter, or any golf club, it is very important to strike the golf ball at the “sweet spot”, which is located at the centroid of the club head's face. Any deviation from the center, even by a minute amount, can cause the golf ball to not travel in a straight direction, which in turn causes the golf ball to miss its target. The instant invention discloses a golf putter 10A having a cylindrically-shaped head, with two putting faces, one located at each end of the cylinder. BY using this design, the size of the putter head's face is significantly decreased, thus allowing the sweet spot to be more easily determined and acquired during a putt.

[0035] The golf putter 10A, as shown in FIGS. 1-8, is comprised of the following major elements: a cylindrical body 12, a shaft attachment insert 26, a putting insert 34, a Putting-practice insert 42 and a shaft 62.

[0036] The cylindrical body 12, as shown in FIGS. 1-3 and 6 is comprised of a hollow structure having a first end 14; a second end 16, a lower section 18 and an upper section 20 having a centered shaft bore 22 located therethrough. The cylindrical body 12 can be constructed of high impact plastic, or a metal such as titanium, aluminum or stainless steel. The cylinder has a preferred length of 4.50 inches (11.43 cm), a preferred outside diameter of 1.50 inches (3.81 cm), and a wall thickness ranging from 0.016 inches (0.041 cm) to 0.125 inches (0.318 cm). The upper edges of the first and second ends 14,16 of the cylindrical body 12 are radiused 24 or have a downward angle 24 of between 20-50 degrees, as shown in FIG. 1.

[0037] The shaft attachment insert 26, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, is constructed of a lightweight material such as wood, plastic or a light metal, and has a shaft cavity 28 and a diameter that is dimensioned to frictionally fit into the cylindrical body 12. The insert is located at the centroid of the cylindrical body, with the shaft cavity 28 in alignment with the centered shaft bore 22 on the cylindrical body's upper section 20. In order to reduce the weight of the shaft attachment insert 26, an axial bore 30 can extend through the insert 26, as shown in FIG. 2.

[0038] The putting insert 34, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3 is comprised of an outer flat face 36 and an inner, substantially flat surface 38. The putting insert 34 has a diameter that is dimensioned to frictionally fit into the first end 14 of the cylindrical body 12, with the outer flat face 36 positioned flush with the first end 14 of the body 12.

[0039] The putting-practicing insert 42 is shown in FIGS. 1, 3, 4 and 5. In FIGS. 1 and 3, the insert 42 is comprised of an outer face, 44 that tapers inward and terminates with a truncated tip 46. In FIG. 4 is shown a putting-practice insert 42 that has a flat face 50 wherefrom its center protrudes outward a ball-striking rod 52. In FIG. 5 is shown a putting-practice insert 42 that has a convex ball-striking surface 54. In all three designs the putting-practice inserts 42 have an inner, substantially flat surface 48. The inner surface 48 has a diameter that is dimensioned to frictionally fit into the second end 16 of the cylindrical body 12, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 6.

[0040] Both the putting insert 34 and the putting-practice insert 42 can be constructed of solid brass, solid bronze, solid stainless steel, solid copper, or a brass or bronze outer shell that is filled with a high-density metal, such as lead. By providing different materials for the construction of the inserts, the weight and elastic characteristics of the inserts can be selected and altered for maximizing the putter's momentum. The momentum is maximized by adding the weight, that would normally be included in the spaces between the putting insert 34 and the putting-practice insert 42, respectfully to the insert 34 and the insert 42. Further, the material used for the cylindrical body 12, as well as the inserts 26, 34, 42, the shaft 61 and the upper gripping section 62 are selected to produce a golf putter having a preferred total weight of 1 pound (453.59 grams).

[0041] The shaft 61, as shown in FIG. 1, is comprised of an upper gripping section 62, a center section 64, and a lower section 66. The lower section 66 has means 68 for being securely attached into the centered shaft bore 22 and the shaft cavity 28 which is located at the centroid of the cylindrical body 12.

[0042] In order to secure the shaft attachment insert-26 within the cylindrical body 12, and the putting insert 34 and the putting-practice insert 42 at each respective end of the cylindrical body 12, an attachment means is utilized. One type of attachment means comprises cooling the metal inserts 26,34 and 42 prior to inserting. Once the inserts are in place they will return to room temperature, which will cause the metal they are constructed of to expand, thus holding them in place. This attachment means will also work to attach the shaft 60 to the cylindrical body 12.

[0043] Another attachment means comprises utilizing an adhesive, (not shown) such as an epoxy, which is applied in a bead-type manner around the interfacing surfaces of the inserts 26,34 and 42 and the cylindrical body 12.

[0044] Another attachment means for attaching the putting insert 34 and the putting-practice insert 42 is shown in FIG. 6. In this means, each insert 34,42 has a stepped-down inner edge 60 that interfaces with the respective first end 14 or second end 16 of the cylindrical body 12.

[0045] The attachment means 68 for attaching the shaft 61 to the cylindrical body 12 comprises the shaft cavity 28 on the shaft attachment insert 26 having a set of internal threads 70, as shown in FIG. 7. The lower section 66 of the shaft 61 has a set of corresponding external threads 72, as also shown in FIG. 7, which are threaded into the internal threads 70 on the shaft attachment insert 26. Additionally the attachment means 68 for attaching the shaft 61 to the cylindrical body 12 can be comprised of an adhesive (not shown), such as epoxy.

[0046] In order to use the golf putter 10A, a person will approach and stand near a golf ball in a conventional manner. Once comfortable, the person aligns his/her shot and then strikes the golf ball using either the first end 14 of the cylindrical body, which comprises the putting insert, or he/she will use the second end 16, which comprises the putting-practice insert 42.

[0047] As the name implies, the putting-practice inserts 42 are designed to teach a golfer to acquire the “sweet spot”. By having the face of the insert 42 include a relatively small ball striking zone, the sweet spot becomes the only place possible to strike the ball. When not practicing, a person will switch to the first end 14, with the putting insert 34. Hopefully, by practicing with one of the putting-practice inserts 42, a person will be able to correctly determine the angle at which to hold the golf putter 10 and how/where to strike the golf ball.

[0048] The object of putting is to have the “sweet spot” of the putter strike the center of the golf ball 50 that the ball is driven in a projected straight line. Unfortunately, it is difficult to determine and acquire the sweet spot and more often than not, the putter strikes the ball at an angle φ that deviates from the sweet spot of the putter, as shown in FIG.8. When this occurs, the trajectory of the ball will deviate from the projected straight line. For example, if a conventional putter is used, and the “sweet spot” of the putter strikes the ball at a distance of 0.25 inches (0.635 cm) from the ball's center, the ball's trajectory will deviate from the projected straight line by an approximate angle of four degrees.

[0049] Conversely, when the inventive putter, which has a larger sweet spot strikes the ball 0.25 inches (0.635 cm) from the ball's center, the ball will only deviate from the projected straight line by an angle of 1.25 degrees. Thus, assuring the player that the probability of driving the ball at the projected straight line is enhanced.

[0050] The golf driver 10B as shown in FIGS. 9-11 is comprised of the following major elements: a cylindrical body 12, a shaft attachment insert 26, a first insert configured as a driving insert 74, a second insert 76 and a shaft 62.

[0051] The cylindrical body 12 and the shaft 62 are similar to the elements used in describing the golf putter and therefore are not described.

[0052] The shaft attachment insert 26 used for the golf driver 74 differs in that the shaft cavity 28 as shown best in FIG. 10 is at an angle that varies between 50 and 65-degrees depending upon the driver selected by the golfer which is further dependent upon the distance and surroundings to the green. The insert angle is in alignment with the centered shaft bore 22 on the cylindrical body's upper section 20.

[0053] The golf driver 10B consists of a first insert and a second insert as shown in FIGS. 9-11. The first insert is configured as a driving insert 74 having an outer surface 76 and an integral inner section 82. The outer surface 76 has a substantially elliptical shape, as shown in FIG. 10, having a downward extending slope 80, as best shown best in FIG. 9. The inner section 82, as shown in FIG. 9, is dimensioned to be frictionally inserted and attached, by an attachment means into the first end 14 of the cylindrical body 12.

[0054] The second insert, which is a non ball-striking insert 94 has a substantially flat outer surface 96 and an integral inner section 98. The inner section 98 is dimensioned to be frictionally inserted and attached, by an attachment means, into the second end 16 of the cylindrical body 12. As with the golf putter, the weight normally included in the space between the driving insert 74 and the non-ball striking insert 94 is applied respectfully to the insert 74 and the insert 94. This added weight greatly increases the momentum of the golf driver 10B. Thus, the area of the sweet spot is increased to allow a more accurate golf ball trajectory.

[0055] While the invention has been described in complete detail and pictorially shown in the accompanying drawings it is not to be limited to such details, since many changes and modifications may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. For example, the basic design of the invention, in some cases, is also applicable to a golf iron. Hence, it is described to cover any and all modifications and forms which may come within the language and scope of the appended claims.





 
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