Title:
Ceiling fan motor housing and method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A ceiling fan motor housing is described.



Inventors:
Curtin, Brett (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Application Number:
10/373535
Publication Date:
08/26/2004
Filing Date:
02/24/2003
Assignee:
Craftmade International, Inc. (Coppell, TX, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F04D17/16; F04D25/04; F04D25/08; F21V33/00; (IPC1-7): F01D5/30
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20060153682Savonius wind turbine constructionJuly, 2006Vanderhye et al.
20100054915AIRFOIL INSERTMarch, 2010Devore et al.
20100028150AIRFOILS WITH AUTOMATIC PITCH CONTROLFebruary, 2010Lawson
20080181776Phase control structure for crank-connecting control diskJuly, 2008Lai
20070098556Impeller of centrifugal fan and centrifugal fan disposed with the impellerMay, 2007Sanagi et al.
20040141851Floating vertical windmill aeration systemJuly, 2004Hite
20080145222ACTIVE TOWER DAMPERJune, 2008Schellings
20100014969WIND TURBINE WITH BLADE PITCH CONTROL TO COMPENSATE FOR WIND SHEAR AND WIND MISALIGNMENTJanuary, 2010Wilson et al.
20070237644TURBINE ROTOR AND TURBINE BLADEOctober, 2007Suzuki et al.
20060280610Turbine blade and method of fabricating sameDecember, 2006Heyward et al.
20080213094CEILING FAN WITH ROTARY BLADE SURFACE LIGHTSeptember, 2008Okimura



Primary Examiner:
TRIEU, THERESA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HAYNES AND BOONE, LLP (901 MAIN STREET, SUITE 3100, DALLAS, TX, 75202, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A housing for surrounding a ceiling fan motor, comprising: a frame; and a cover for covering the frame.

2. The housing of claim 1 wherein the cover is translucent.

3. The housing of claim 1 wherein the cover is a textile.

4. The housing of claim 1 wherein the cover is silk.

5. The housing of claim 1 wherein the cover is a textile affixed to a backing to form panels which are attached to the frame.

6. The housing of claim 5 wherein the backing is styrene.

7. The housing of claim 1 wherein the cover is a natural film.

8. The housing of claim 1 wherein the cover is a synthetic film.

9. The housing of claim 1 wherein the cover is paper.

10. The housing of claim 1 wherein the frame imparts its shape to the cover.

11. The housing of claim 1 wherein the frame is octagonal.

12. The housing of claim 1 wherein the frame is rectangular.

13. The housing of claim 1 wherein the frame is round.

14. A ceiling fan comprising: a motor having a rod extending therefrom; a bracket attached to the rod; and a frame attached to the bracket, the frame being covered by a cover.

15. The fan of claim 14 wherein the cover is translucent.

16. The fan of claim 14 wherein the cover is a textile.

17. The fan of claim 14 wherein the cover is silk.

18. The fan of claim 14 wherein the cover is a textile affixed to a backing to form panels which are attached to the frame.

19. The fan of claim 18 wherein the backing is styrene.

20. The fan of claim 14 wherein the cover is a natural film.

21. The fan of claim 14 wherein the cover is a synthetic film.

22. The fan of claim 14 wherein the cover is paper.

23. The fan of claim 14 wherein the frame imparts its shape to the cover.

24. The fan of claim 14 wherein the frame is octagonal.

25. The fan of claim 14 wherein the frame is rectangular.

26. The fan of claim 1 wherein the frame is round.

27. A method of providing a ceiling fan motor housing, comprising: providing a frame; and providing a cover for covering the frame.

Description:

BACKGROUND

[0001] The present disclosure relates generally to a ceiling fan motor housing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0002] FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of a ceiling fan having a motor housing according to one embodiment of the present disclosure.

[0003] FIG. 2 is a partial sectional view of the ceiling fan.

[0004] FIG. 3 is a top perspective view of a bracket.

[0005] FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the bracket.

[0006] FIG. 5 is a bottom perspective view of a frame of the ceiling fan motor housing.

[0007] FIG. 6 is a bottom perspective view of a frame according to an alternative embodiment.

[0008] FIG. 7 is a bottom perspective view of a frame according to yet another alternative embodiment.

DESCRIPTION

[0009] Referring to FIG. 1, a ceiling fan 1 is illustrated. The ceiling fan 1 has a motor housing 10.

[0010] The housing 10 covers a conventional ceiling fan motor 12. It is understood that the ceiling fan motor 12 has a down rod 13 for attaching the ceiling fan motor to a ceiling (not depicted). The ceiling fan motor 12 also has associated conventional blade irons 14 and conventional ceiling fan blades 15. It is understood that for purposes of simplicity, individual components that are substantially the same, such as each of the blade irons 14 or each of the blades 15, are given a single reference number when discussed in this specification.

[0011] As illustrated, the ceiling fan motor 12 is mounted upside down from the conventional orientation to allow the blade irons 14 and ceiling fan blades 15 to protrude above the housing 10. However, in another embodiment (not depicted) the ceiling fan motor is mounted in the conventional orientation.

[0012] The housing 10 comprises a cover 16, at least a portion of which is translucent for reasons to be described. The cover 16 is disposed adjacent to a base 18.

[0013] The base 18 has a decorative feature 20 associated with it. Although the decorative feature 20 is illustrated as a tassel, it is understood that all of the decorative features normally associated with lighting fixtures, such as finials, cross bars, arms, rings, balls, flutes, and the like are contemplated.

[0014] Referring now to FIGS. 1-2, a frame 22 is disposed beneath the cover 16. The frame 22 supports the cover 16, and thus defines the shape of the housing 10, as will be discussed in greater detail with reference to FIG. 5. For example, as illustrated in FIG. 1, the frame 22 imparts an octagonal shape to the housing 10.

[0015] The frame 22 rests on the base 18, and a bracket 24 attaches the frame 22 to the ceiling fan motor 12, as will be discussed in greater detail with reference to FIG. 3. In an alternative embodiment, the base 18 is omitted, and solely the bracket 24 attaches the frame 22 to the ceiling fan motor 12. In this embodiment (not depicted), a conventional light diffuser, such as a plastic disk (not depicted), may be placed up inside the frame 22.

[0016] A conventional remote control unit 26 is disposed adjacent to the bracket 24 for controlling the ceiling fan motor 12. Likewise, a conventional lighting fixture, generally denoted by the reference number 28, is disposed adjacent to the remote control 26. The lighting fixture 28 provides illumination through the translucent cover 16.

[0017] A rod 30 extends from the ceiling fan motor 12 to engage a receiver 18a of the base 18. In one embodiment, the rod 30 is a conventional down rod, which is disposed upside down from the conventional orientation due to the above-described illustrated orientation of the motor 12.

[0018] Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, the bracket 24 has a central bore 31, which allows the bracket to be affixed to the rod 30. A plurality of arms 32 extend outward from the area defining the bore 31 to surround the motor 12. Each of the arms has an upwardly bent portion 32a, the distal end of the portion engaging the frame 22.

[0019] The bracket 24 has an attachment point, such as a bore 34, for allowing mechanical engagement between the bracket and the remote control unit 26, and an attachment point, such as a bore 36, for allowing mechanical engagement between the bracket and the frame 22.

[0020] Referring now to FIG. 5, the frame 22 comprises a set of lateral members 42a-d. The lateral members 42a-d determine the radial cross section of the housing 10 (FIG. 1), for example, the lateral members impart an octagonal shape to the housing in this embodiment.

[0021] The lateral members 42a-d are longitudinally spaced apart by a plurality of vertical bars 44a-c. The vertical bars 44a-c determine the axial cross section of the housing 10. Generally, the vertical bars 44a-c are curved or straight, depending on the desired shape of the housing 10, as will be discussed. The vertical bars 44a extend between lateral members 42a and 42b. The vertical bars 44b extend between lateral members 42b and 42c. The vertical bars 44c extend between lateral members 42c and 42d.

[0022] Referring to FIGS. 2 and 5, the inwardly curved vertical bars 44a and 44c engender concave portions of the cover 16, when taken in an axial section, whereas the straight vertical bars 44b engender a flat portion of the cover 16, when taken in an axial section.

[0023] As noted above, the main purpose of the lateral members and vertical bars is to impart a predetermined shape to the housing 10, although at least some of the lateral members have a structural function, for example, lateral member 42d rests on the base 18, while the lateral member 42a engages the bracket 24.

[0024] In a first embodiment, the cover 16 (FIG. 1) is a textile, such as silk, which is attached to the frame 22. As the cover 16 (FIG. 1) is stretched across the frame 22, the lateral members 42a-d and vertical bars 44a-c will appear to partition the cover into contiguous panels.

[0025] In a second embodiment, the cover 16 (FIG. 1) is a textile that is affixed to a backing such as styrene with a conventional adhesive to form panels of a convenient size, which are then attached to the frame 22.

[0026] In a third embodiment, the cover 16 (FIG. 1) is a natural or synthetic film.

[0027] In a fourth embodiment, the cover 16 (FIG. 1) is paper.

[0028] In operation, the housing 10, comprising the cover 16 and the frame 22, is attached to the bracket 24, thereby covering the motor 12.

[0029] Referring to FIG. 6, a frame 60 comprises a set of lateral members 62a-d longitudinally spaced apart by a plurality of vertical bars 64a-c. The vertical bars 64a extend between lateral members 62a and 62b, the vertical bars 64b extend between lateral members 62b and 62c, and the vertical bars 64c extend between lateral members 62c and 62d. As described above, the main purpose of the lateral members and vertical bars is to impart a predetermined shape, in this case round when taken in a radial cross section, to a housing (not depicted).

[0030] In operation, a housing comprising the cover 16 and the frame 60, is attached to the bracket 24, thereby covering the motor 12.

[0031] Referring to FIG. 7, a frame 70 comprises a set of lateral members 72a-d longitudinally spaced apart by a plurality of vertical bars 74a-c. The vertical bars 74a extend between lateral members 72a and 72b, the vertical bars 74b extend between lateral members 72b and 72c, and the vertical bars 74c extend between lateral members 72c and 72d. As previously described, the main purpose of the lateral members and vertical bars is to impart a predetermined shape, in this case square when taken in a radial cross section, to a housing (not depicted).

[0032] In operation, a housing comprising the cover 16 and the frame 70, is attached to the bracket 24, thereby covering the motor 12.

[0033] Although only a few exemplary embodiments of this invention have been described in detail above, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that many other modifications are possible without materially departing from the novel teachings and advantages of the invention. Accordingly, all such modifications are intended to be included within the scope of this invention as defined in the following claims.