Title:
Cordless pedal flush system for a tank-type toilet
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A cordless pedal flush system (114) for a tank-type toilet (10). The cordless pedal flush system (114) employs a floor positioned cordless pedal actuator (92), a tank mounted receiver control unit (76) and a motorized flush/trip handle actuator (118). The flush/trip handle actuator (118) replaces the conventional manual flush handle (22) employed on most tank-type toilets. The system is a self-contained DC battery powered system that is activated by the user depressing and releasing a push-button (106) on the cordless pedal actuator (92) with the foot, thus eliminating the need for physical hand touching. Once the cordless pedal actuator (92) is activated, it transmits a coded command signal to the receiver control unit (76). Once the Transmitter identification code (TIC) (124) is validated by the receiver control unit (76), activation causes a flush/trip handle actuator (118) to pivot upwards a flush arm (26) to raise a flapper valve (38) from the valve seat (40) of the toilet (10) so as to flush the toilet (10). The flush/trip handle actuator (118) also allows for the normal manual hand flush.



Inventors:
Herman Jr., Holt Hogues (New Orleans, LA, US)
Application Number:
10/359784
Publication Date:
08/12/2004
Filing Date:
02/07/2003
Assignee:
HOGUES HERMAN HOLT
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E03D5/08; E03D5/10; (IPC1-7): E03D5/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FETSUGA, ROBERT M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Herman H. Hogues, Jr. (8430 Curran Blvd., New Orleans, LA, 70127, US)
Claims:

What is claimed:



1. A cordless pedal flush system operable in flushing a tank-type toilet, said system comprising: a cordless pedal housing, having a suitable transmitting means for transmitting a encoded command signal wherein electrical power for operation of said transmitting means is derived solely from a Direct Current power source, and, a receiver housing having a reception means for capturing said encoded command signal transmitted by said transmitting means wherein electrical power for operation of said reception means is derived solely from a Direct Current power source, and; a decoding means for determining and validating the encoded signal captured by said reception means, and; a control means for executing programmed steps indicative of verification of said encoded signal verified by said decoding means, and; a motorized flush mechanism replacement for replacing a conventional manual flush handle employed on tank-type toilets, said motorized flush mechanism having a flushing means for mechanically emulating a manual flush handle operable during the flushing of a tank-type toilet, and; a connector device having a coupling means for interconnecting said receiver housing and said motorized flush mechanism.

2. The system according to claim 1 wherein said transmitting means is a radio frequency transmitter circuit employed within said cordless pedal housing.

3. The system according to claim 1 wherein said reception means is a radio frequency receiver circuit employed within said receiver housing.

4. The system according to claim 1 wherein said encoded command signal is a transmitter identification code encoded with circuit hardware employed with the transmitter circuitry.

5. The system according to claim 1 wherein said decoding means is microprocessor hardware employed with the receiver circuitry.

6. The system according to claim 1 wherein said control means is microprocessor hardware employed with the receiver circuitry.

7. The system according to claim 6 further comprising a timer circuit employed with said control means.

8. The system according to claim 6 further comprising a time adjustment switch configured on the timer circuit to adjust a hold time wherein said motorized flush mechanism is held idle to hold open a flapper valve before returning to a close position when flushing a tank-type toilet.

9. The system according to claim 1 wherein said connector means is a holding bracket suitable for attachment to the rim of a toilet tank having a plug in means for attaching and securing said receiver housing in which a power cable is employed to connect said holding bracket to said motorized flush mechanism.

10. The system according to claim 1 wherein said motorized flush handle is a flush/handle combined with a small DC motor engaged in gear reduction with a gear-train for coupling rotational energy to produce a sufficient RPM ratio between motor and output shaft torque to rotate and pivot upwards to lift a plunger of flapper valve from its seat to cause the flushing of a tank-type toilet.

11. A cordless pedal flush system operable in flushing a tank-type toilet, said system comprising: a cordless pedal housing, having a suitable transmitting means for transmitting a encoded command signal wherein electrical power for operation of said transmitting means is derived solely from a self contained Direct Current power source, and; a receiver housing having a detection means for capturing said encoded command signal transmitted by said transmitting means wherein electrical power for operation of said detection means is derived solely from a Direct Current power source, and; a decoding means for determining and validating the encoded signal detected by said detection means, and; a control means for executing programmed steps indicative of verification of said encoded signal verified by said decoding means, and; a motorized flush handle replacement for replacing a conventional manual flush handle employed on tank-type toilets, said motorized flush mechanism having a flushing means for mechanically emulating a manual flush handle operable during the flushing of a tank-type toilet, and; a connector device having a coupling means for interconnecting said receiver housing and said motorized flush mechanism.

12. The system according to claim 11 wherein said transmitting means is a infrared transmitter circuit employed within said cordless pedal housing.

13. The system according to claim 11 wherein said detection means is a infrared detection circuit employed within said receiver housing.

14. The system according to claim 11 wherein said encoded command signal is a transmitter identification code encoded with circuit hardware employed with the transmitter circuitry.

15. The system according to claim 11 wherein said decoding means is microprocessor hardware employed with the detection circuitry.

16. The system according to claim 11 wherein said control means is microprocessor hardware employed with the detection circuitry.

17. The system according to claim 16 further comprising timer circuit employed with said control means.

18. The system according to claim 16 further comprising a time adjustment switch configured on the timer circuit to adjust a hold time wherein said motorized flush mechanism is held idle to hold open a flapper valve before returning to a close position when flushing a tank-type toilet.

19. The system according to claim 11 wherein said connecting means is a holding bracket suitable for attachment to the rim of a toilet tank having a plug in means for attaching and securing said receiver housing in which a power cable is employed to connect said holding bracket to said motorized flush mechanism.

20. The system according to claim 11 wherein said motorized flush handle is a flush handle combined with a enclosure that employs a small DC motor engaged in gear reduction with a gear train for coupling rotational energy to produce a sufficient RPM ratio between motor and output shaft torque to rotate and pivot upwards to lift a plunger or flapper valve from its seat to cause the flushing of a tank-type toilet.

Description:

BACKGROUND-FIELD OF INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention relates generally to a cordless pedal flush system for a tank-type toilet and more particularly a pedal transmitter flush activation system.

[0003] An additional aspect of the present invention also relates to a receiver control unit that captures the signal and directs an operational current to a motorized flush handle used in activating the flushing of a tank-type toilet.

[0004] 2. Background-Description of Prior Art

[0005] For various and well understood reasons, such as the passage of germs that could lead to sickness, it is generally desirable to flush a toilet without touching the toilet handle with one's hands.

[0006] One way in which the need to make physical contact with the flushing of public toilets has been reduced is the incorporation of automatic flushing systems. Not only are these automatic flushing systems expensive for the average home, but they can be very ineffective and cause such problems as excessive water consumption or unflushed conditions when the detection device malfunctions. Some automatic flushing systems use infrared detection systems. These elaborate systems however, are very expensive and require highly skilled technicians for service and installation.

[0007] Other known features for toilets, which reduce the amount of physical contact, are automatic flushing systems for public facilities. Most systems use an infrared transmitter and detection system to sense the presence of a user so as to automatically flush the toilet after the user has been sensed, and has left the area immediately in front of the toilet bowl.

[0008] These automatic flushing systems provide a number of features that make it a valuable system for limiting physical contact with the toilet.

[0009] Although these automatic flushing systems are great for reducing the amount of physical contact, they fall short in actual practice because they can only work effectively in public restrooms where the toilets are placed in restricted areas for use.

[0010] These automatic-flushing systems wouldn't work well in home bathrooms because of the bathroom configuration. The detection system would be ineffective due to the different movements of the occupant. For example, the infrared detector would activate a flush even if the occupant was passing to get into the shower or bathtub or simply replacing bath towels, etc.

[0011] A search of the prior art brought to light the following U.S. patents, which disclose devices in the same general field of the present invention but without the unique and novel advantages of the present invention.

[0012] U.S. Pat. No. 5,603,127: Issued on Feb. 18, 1997 to Veal: Auto Flush for a Tank Type toilet. This document discloses a infrared Detection Flushing system. This prior art does not offer a discrete cordless pedal flush system more applicable for home bathrooms.

[0013] U.S. Pat. No. 5,313,673 issued on May 24, 1994 to SAADI: Electronic Flush Valve Arrangement. This Document discloses a sensor for a flushing device, detailing a radiation detection detection system. This prior art does not offer a discrete cordless pedal flush system, which is less expensive and more applicable for home bathrooms.

[0014] U.S. Pat. No. 5,228,146: issued on Jul. 20, 1993 to Martell: Flushing device for toilet. This document discloses an electrically operated flushing system. This prior art device would be a very expensive retrofit for the average home bathroom.

[0015] U.S. Pat. No. 5,187,818: issued on Feb. 23, 1993 to Barrett, Sr.: Flushing system for a water closet. This document discloses a sensor detection system. This prior device does not offer a discrete cordless pedal flush.

[0016] U.S. Pat. No. 5,169,118: issued on Dec. 8, 1992 to Whiteside: Sensor-operated battery powered flush valve. This document discloses a solenoid valve controlled by infrared sensors. This prior art device is not practical for home use.

[0017] U.S. Pat. No. 4,941,215: issued in July 1990 to Liv: Automatic flushing device for a flush toilet. This prior art device does not offer a discrete cordless pedal flush more practical for home use.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

[0018] FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a typical tank-type toilet (10) equipped with a cordless pedal flush system (114) according to the present invention;

[0019] FIG. 2 shows a un-assembled perspective view of a flush/trip handle actuator (118) connected with the accompanying holding bracket (70) according to the present invention;

[0020] FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of a receiver control unit (76) shown plugged into the holding bracket (70) according to the present invention;

[0021] FIG. 4 shows a perspective cut-away view of the gear-train assembly (48) according to the present invention;

[0022] FIG. 5 shows a perspective view detailing a raised arm switch (128), a lowered arm switch (126) and control arm (127) employed with the gear-train assembly (48) according to the present invention;

[0023] FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of an assembled flush/trip handle actuator (118) exposing a hidden view of the operating components including a view of the attached holding bracket (70) according to the present invention.

[0024] FIG. 7 shows several blown apart perspective views of a cordless pedal actuator (92) and a view of a complete assembled cordless pedal actuator (92) according to the present invention;

[0025] FIG. 8 shows a plan view of the gear arrangement employed with the gear-train assembly (48) according to the present invention.

[0026] FIG. 9 shows a stylized simplified block diagram implemented with the circuitry according to the present invention.

[0027] FIG. 10 is a logic flow diagram of a transmission operation of the cordless pedal actuator (92) of FIG. 7 in accordance with the present invention.

[0028] FIG. 11 is a logic flow diagram of a reception operation of the receiver control unit (76) of FIG. 3 in accordance with the present invention. 1

Reference Numbers in Drawing
10Toilet58Pinion gear
14Toilet tank60Driven gear
22Flush handle64Case frame
24Shank68Power supply cable
26Flush arm70Holding bracket
27Manual flush handle72Locknut
32Lift chain74Anchor leg
34Lift portion76Receiver control unit
38Flapper valve82Battery compartment
40Valve seat83Holding bracket
receptacle
44Pivot end84Lock tab push button
48Gear-train assembly85Set screw
50Output shaft86Lock tab
52Drive gear88Access cover
54Lift motor90Plug-in connector
55Spur gear92Cordless pedal
actuator
56Guide groove94Position indicator
95Angle mark127Control arm
96Transmitter circuit128Raised arm switch
board
97Bore130Receiver circuit
board
98Receiver circuit135Case frame enclosure
99Wedge insert140Flush handle stem
100Contacts141Adjustment arm pointer
101Electrical contacts142Adjustment arm
102Access opening143Batteries
103Electrical conduits144Resistors
104Spring145Capacitors
106Push-button146Integrated circuit
108Base160Insertion member
110Rubber boot162Rectangular-shaped
aperture
112Top plate241Diodes
114Cordless pedal244Decoder
flush system
118Flush/Trip handle245Control module
actuator
120Transmitter circuit246Wire conduit
124Transmitter identification247Wire conduit
code (TIC)
126Lower arm switch248Antenna

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

[0029] In accordance with the teachings of the present invention, a cordless pedal flush system for a tank-type toilet is disclosed.

[0030] Further, in accordance with this invention, the cordless pedal flush system employs a tank mounted receiver control unit that employs a receiver circuit that captures and decodes a coded command signal transmitted by the cordless pedal transmitter.

[0031] Further, in accordance with this invention, both pedal transmitter and receiver control unit are powered by self-contained DC batteries.

[0032] Further, in accordance with this invention, the cordless pedal actuator employs a microprocessor that reads out an encoded transmitter identification code. The (TIC) uniquely couples both the transmitter and receiver units.

[0033] The receiver control unit circuit includes decoding hardware employed to identify and verify a (TIC) match for each cordless pedal flush system. The cordless pedal flush system is designed to avoid interference when multiple systems are operated within the same general area.

[0034] Further in accordance with this invention, a Flush/Trip handle actuator is installed replacing the conventional manual flush handle employed on most tank-type toilets. The Flush/Trip handle actuator is a motorized gear driven mechanism powered by a small DC motor engaged in gear reduction to rotate and pivot upwards the flush arm to lift the plunger of flapper valve from the valve seat to cause the flushing of a tank-type toilet.

[0035] Further, in accordance with the invention, the Flush/Trip handle actuator also allows for the conventional manual flushing of the toilet.

[0036] Further, in accordance with the invention, the cordless pedal flush system employs a holding bracket mounted on the rim of the toilet tank. The holding bracket is used for connecting the receiver control unit to the system. The holding bracket includes a power supply cable connected between the holding bracket and the flush/trip handle actuator.

[0037] Further in accordance with this invention, the installation and operation of the cordless pedal flush system is designed to be an inexpensive simple system that is affordable to the average household.

[0038] A complete understanding of this invention will be obtained from the detailed description that follows.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0039] Referring now to the drawing in greater detail, a typical tank-type toilet (10) is illustrated in FIG. 1 shown equipped with a cordless pedal flush system (114). A cordless pedal actuator (92) is shown positioned on the floor slightly away from the base of the toilet (10). A receiver control unit (76) is shown plugged into a holding bracket (70), which is attached to the rim of the toilet tank (14) an positioned outside of the toilet tank (14).

[0040] A Flush/Trip handle actuator (118) is shown installed in place of a conventional manual flush handle (27). A flush arm (26) is shown connected to a lift chain (32), which is connected to a flapper valve (38) positioned over a valve seat (40). The power supply cable (68) is shown connected between the holding bracket (70) and the Flush/Trip handle actuator (118).

[0041] Referring to FIG. 2, a typical embodiment of a Flush/Trip handle actuator (118) of the present invention is illustrated unassembled along with the holding bracket (70). As is known in the arts the Flush handle (22), shank (24), locknut (72) and position indicator (94) is of molded plastic or any other suitable material. The end portion of the Flush handle stem (140) includes a rectangular shaped aperture (162) for insertion member (160) employed centered on the backside of the case frame enclosure (135). The rear of the flush handle (22) details a triangular shaped depression where the Flush handle stem (140) is connected. The base of the shank has a triangular shaped fence positioned within the depression directly against the base of the flush handle stem (140). The fence is used as a stop when the flush handle (22) is manually pressed when flushing the toilet (10). The shank (24) and position indicator (94) are held stationary by the locknut (72). The flush handle stem (140) is rotated through the shank (24) opening to pivot the case frame enclosure (135) along with the flush arm (26).

[0042] The case frame enclosure (135) of the Flush/Trip handle actuator (118) is a sealed watertight assembly employed to protect the enclosed gear-train assembly (48) including the lift motor (54). The case frame enclosure (135) also of a rigid molded plastic or other suitable material is a cylindrical shaped device. A Flush arm (26) also of molded plastic is generally as is known in the arts is detachable from the output shaft (50) that extends from the center of the case frame enclosure (135). The flush arm (26) can be of different shapes to adapt to the different shaped toilet tanks (14). A power supply cable (68) employs a four-wire conduit each being separately insulated and enclosed within a watertight rubber insulation material.

[0043] A holding bracket (70) is also of a rigid molded plastic and employs two flexible anchor legs (74) and the holding bracket receptacle (83).

[0044] Referring to FIG. 3 a typical embodiment of a receiver control unit (76) of the present invention is illustrated along with a more detailed description of the connecting holding bracket (70).

[0045] Now directing ones attention to the receiver control unit (76) housing. As can be seen the housing is a rectangular shaped enclosure preferably constructed of a rigid molded plastic material. The top portion of the enclosure details a half circular boss plug-in connector (90). Four metal electrical contacts (100) are attached for surface contact and wired to the intrical electrical circuitry components enclosed within the receiver control unit (76). (Not shown) As can be seen the receiver control unit (76) is a detachable unit for easy recharging or changing of batteries. The receiver control unit (76) defines a lock tap push button (84) recessed into a groove for depressing an unlocking the tab for detachment.

[0046] A receiver circuit board (130) is employed and sized to fit within the receiver control unit (76) enclosure. The circuit board (130) integrates the electrical components known in the arts such as batteries (143), (not shown) resistors (144) (not shown), capacitors (145) (not shown), integrated circuits (146) diodes (241), (not shown) and antenna (248) (not shown) as well known and understood in the arts. An adjustable hold time set screw (not shown) is employed with the receiver control unit (76). Now turning ones attention to a typical embodiment of the holding bracket (70) shown connected to the receiver control unit (76). The anchor legs (74) are thin flexible plastic rectangular vertical members connected at the top with a thin plastic horizontal rectangular member. The attached holding bracket receptacle (83) is an inverted cup-shaped member with a grooved bore opening for the insertion of the plug-in connector (90). Four electrical contacts are employed within the receptacle bore and wired through mortise pathways within and attached to four thin metal electrical conduits encapsulated and routed through the anchor legs (74) and connected to the power supply cable (68) and connection.

[0047] Referring to FIG. 4 a gear-train assembly (48) is shown. This unit is the motorized mechanism housed within, and powers the flush/trip handle actuator (118). The spur gears (55) are of molded plastic with the exception of the of the driven gear (60). The gears are arranged and engaged in an epicyclical pattern and supported between two round shaped cased frames (64) also of rigid molded plastic. The drive gear (52) is driven by a pinion gear (58) connected at the end of the lift motor (54) shaft. The driven gear (60) is preferably metal. An output shaft (50) also of metal extends from the center of the driven gear (60) and protrudes through an opening in the center of the front case frame (64). The lift motor (54) is a small DC motor. One specific appliance motor is a Copal LC-10-382 or any suitable type motor is applicable.

[0048] Now turning to FIG. 5, two position switches are shown positioned outside the front case frame (64), which includes the extended output shaft (50). Lowered arm switch (126) angle of position to raised arm switch (128) are adjustable to each other. They are positioned epicyclical to the output shaft (50). An adjustment arm (142) is a lever where the raised arm switch (128) is attached and extends upwards through an aperture in the top of the case frame enclosure (135). A control arm (127) shown attached at the base of the output shaft (50) rotates with the output shaft (50) between lowered arm switch (126) and raised arm switch (128). These switches can be any appropriate limit switches as is known in the arts and are electrically connected to the control module (245).

[0049] Referring to FIG. 7 a typical embodiment of a cordless pedal flush actuator (92) of the present invention is illustrated in two exploded views and also shown as a complete assembled unit. The design of the cordless pedal flush actuator (92) is mostly constructed of a polished metal alloy for weight and durability. The actuator is a circular structure with a parabolic cross section with a fairing sloping surface with a protruding push-button (106) extending from the top. The housing is of two halves. The top plate (112) preferable of a polished metal alloy, details an access opening (102) for insertion of the push-button (106), which is preferablly, a rigid molded plastic. A circular u-shaped electrical contact (101) is attached to the underside of the push-button (106). The base (108) also of polished metal defines an opening bore (97) positioned through the center of the base (108). The bottom portion of the base (108) defines an access cover (88) for access to the battery compartment (82). The opening bore (97) defines three different layered sections separated by a pair of rigid molded plastic wedged inserts (99). The wedged inserts (99) are circular and sized to fit in a section groove within the bore (97). During assembly, the first wedged insert (99) is installed from the top and positioned in the lower portion of the bore (97). Sufficient space is left in the bottom portion of the base (108) for the battery compartment (82) located beneath the first installed wedged insert (99). A transmitter circuit board (96) is installed and connected on top of the first installed wedged insert (99). As is well known and understood in the arts the wired circuit board (96) is used to interconnect all the electrical components such as batteries (143), resistors (144), capacitors (145), integrated circuit (146) (not shown), diodes (241) and antenna (248). The second wedged insert (99) is installed and positioned above the transmitter circuit board (96). The mating circular u-shaped electrical contact (101) is connected on top of the second wedged insert (99). A spring (104) is positioned in the center of the electrical contacts (101) before coupling the top plate (112) to the base (108) completing the assembly. Finally as can be seen the assembled cordless pedal actuator (92) is compressed into a detachable rubber boot (110) constructed of a rubbery type material with a circular shape and fairing sloping surface sized to fit the bottom half exterior portion of the cordless pedal actuator (92).

[0050] Now referring to FIG. 8, a plan view of the gear-train assembly (48) is illustrated. The gear arrangement is shown including the position of the lower arm switch (126) and raised arm switch (128). The control arm (127) is shown with hidden lines and the adjustment arm (142) is shown with the raised arm switch (128) attached. As can be seen the adjustment arm (142) can pivot in a circular guide groove (56) to position the raised arm switch (128) to a position where it can be engaged by the control arm (127) to signal the control module (245) to customize the length of travel for pivoting the flush arm (26) dependent upon the size and make of toilets.

[0051] FIG. 9 shows a stylized block diagram implemented with the circuitry according to the present invention. The operation will be discussed later in these specifications.

[0052] Now directing ones attention to the unassembled flush/trip handle actuator (118) shown in FIG. 2. Before installation, the shank (24) is slid over the flush handle stem (140) before inserting the flush handle stem (140) into the flush handle opening on the toilet tank (10). The flush handle (22) is inserted with the attached shank (24) through the opening from the outside front of the toilet tank (10). The position indicator (94) is slid onto the end of the shank (24) and secured with the locknut (72) being screwed on from within the toilet tank (10). The gear-train assembly (48) enclosed within the case frame enclosure (135) is attached by inserting the insertion member (160) into the end of the flush handle stem (140). The position indicator (94) is adjusted and aligned with the zero mark located on top of the case frame enclosure (135). The pivot end (44) of the flush arm (26) is inserted onto the end of the output shaft (50). The lift chain (32) is connected to the lift portion (34) of the flush arm (26). The flush/trip handle actuator (118) should now be capable of being manually rotated to provide a manual flush and setting the limit for the travel distance for the flush arm (26). The procedure for setting the limit for the travel distance for the flush arm (26) can be set by manually rotating the flush/trip handle actuator (118) to fully opening the flapper valve (38) from it's valve seat (40). Notice the angle mark (95) of the position indicator (94). Align the adjustment arm pointer (141) to the same angle mark (95). Raised arm switch (128) is now properly positioned to be engaged by the control arm (127) signaling the control module (245) when the flapper valve (38) has reached maximum height and fully open. The holding bracket (70) is attached onto the rim of the toilet tank (14). The receiver control unit (76) is plugged into the holding bracket receptacle (83) positioned outside of the toilet tank (14). The flush/trip handle actuator (118) can now be operated by the cordless pedal actuator (92) to flush the toilet.

[0053] The flush/trip handle actuator (118) is a motorized mechanical handle that replaces a conventional manual flush handle (27) on a tank-type toilet. The advantages of the flush/trip handle actuator (118) is that it can be used in two different ways. First the flush handle (22) can be manually pressed to rotate the flush handle stem (140) and case frame enclosure (135) with connecting flush arm (26) to lift the flapper valve (38) via connecting chain to flush the toilet. Second which is the essence of the present invention the flush/trip handle actuator (118) when energized by the cordless pedal actuator (92) can mechanically mimic the same flushing action without the use of ones hands. As can be seen when energized the flush arm (26) is pivoted upwards by the rotation of the output shaft (50). During a manual flush the flush handle (22) is pressed by the users hands to rotate the complete assembly by rotating the flush handle stem (140) through the stationary shank (24) opening to rotate the case frame enclosure (135) with the attached flush arm (26) to lift the flapper valve (38) from its valve seat (40) to its maximum height to initiate a conventional flushing of a tank-type toilet.

[0054] The receiver control unit (76) employs a rechargeable DC battery contained within the battery compartment (82). A receiver circuit board (130) is employed within the receiver control unit (76) which is a detachable unit which employs a plug-in connector (90) used to plug into or remove from the holding bracket receptacle (83). A pair of lock tabs (86) is used to secure the receiver control unit (76) to the holding bracket (70) attached to the sidewalls of the toilet tank (14). A pair of anchor legs (74) is employed with the holding bracket (70). A power supply cable (68) is employed to supply power and control signals from the receiver control unit (76) to the flush/trip handle actuator (118).

[0055] The gear-train assembly (48) powers the flush/trip handle actuator (118). The lift motor (54) is operable to rotate in either direction depending on the polarity of the electrical signal from the control module (245). The main feature of the gear-train assembly (48) is to utilize the lift motor (54) being engaged with an arrangement of spur gears (55) to rotate the output shaft (50) employed to pivot upwards the flush arm (26) employed with the flush/trip handle actuator (118). The gear-train assembly (48) is controlled by a pair of position switches activated by a control arm (127) as is well known and understood in the arts.

[0056] The case frame enclosure (135) is a watertight sealed enclosure to protect the gear-train assembly (48). Installation of the flush/trip handle actuator (118) is as simple as removing the conventional manual flush handle (27) and replacing it with the present invention.

[0057] As is known, the cordless pedal actuator (92) when depressed generates and transmits a coded command signal to the receiver control unit (76). An access cover is employed to access the battery compartment. A non-skid rubber boot (110) is employed as being a separate detachable part of the cordless pedal actuator (92). As can be seen the cordless pedal actuator (92) is a simple contoured ruggedly designed device selectively designed for sufficient weight and durability.

Operations of Invention

[0058] Now turning ones attention to the electrical block circuit diagram for the printed wired circuit board for the transmitter circuit (120) and receiver circuit (98). The circuit board integrates the electrical components known in the art, such as batteries (143), resistors (144), capacitors (145), integrated circuits (146), and diodes (241) (all not shown). Briefly directing ones attention to the cordless pedal actuator (92) employing a transmitter circuit (120). This unit is used by the user to initiate a flush sequence of a tank-type toilet. The user will press and release the push-button (106) to transmit a coded signal to the receiver control unit (76). The coded signal is transmitted where it is transformed into a series of binary ones and zeros by the receiver unit and supplied via wire (246) to the decoder (244) where they are assembled into distinctive binary codes representing the transmitter identification code (124) via wire to the control module (245). If the code matches the code it expects, the control module (245) initiates a timed flush sequence.

[0059] The control module (245) will initiate a timed sequential flush by activating the power circuit to the lift motor (54). The lift motor (54) will drive the gear-train assembly (48) in one direction to rotate the output shaft (50) and raise the flush arm (26) upwards. This raises the flapper or plunger valve for flushing of a tank-type toilet. Additionally there are two position switches employed with the gear-train assembly (48). The two switches are adjacent to one another positioned along the rotational path of the control arm (127) attached at the base of the output shaft (50). The travel distance for the control arm (127) is adjustable by an adjustment arm (142), which can pivot the base of the raised arm switch (128). Both raised arm switch (128) and lowered arm switch (126) are electrically connected to the control module (245). The operation of the two switches is known and well understood in the arts, and as used here provides an indication to the control module (245) as to the position of the flush arm (26). In other words, both switches are normally open until the output shaft (50) is rotated and causes the control arm (127) to engage and close either the raised arm switch (128) or the lowered arm switch (126). Consequently, the control module (245) will electronically know in what position the flush arm (26) is in, whether raised or lowered. The lift motor (54) will drive the gear-train assembly (48) and pivot upwards the flush arm (26) until the control arm (127) engages and closes the raised arm switch (128). The control module (245) is signaled to deactivate the power circuit to the lift motor (54). An adjustable timer circuit is activated. Once the timer circuit is activated the control module (245) will count “1 . . . 2 . . . 3 . . . 4” depending on the setting before reversing polarity and restarting the lift motor (54). The reversing of rotation of the lift motor (54) will drive the gear-train assembly (48) in the opposite direction. This sequence will rotate the flush arm (26) back to its original start position allowing the control arm (127) to engage and close the lowered arm switch (126). This signals the control module (245) to deactivate the power circuit and reset allowing for the toilet tank to refill for the next flush.

Conclusion, Ramifications, and Scope

[0060] Accordingly, the reader will see that the cordless pedal flush system invention can be used to flush a toilet more conveniently and with less effort. In addition to preventing the passage of germs that could lead to sickness, the cordless pedal flush system eliminates the necessity of using ones hands to flush a toilet. The cordless pedal flush system has additional advantages in that: It permits the average household to afford a healthier yet simple means for flushing a toilet without the use of ones hands. It remedies common flush problems associated with tank-type toilets due to worn or misaligned fixtures such as short cycle flushes that require the user to hold down the flush handle in order to get a complete flush. It would also prevent the common problem of the behind the back task of flushing while being seated on a toilet.

[0061] Although the description above contains many specifications, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention, but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of the invention.

[0062] Accordingly, the scope of the invention is only to be limited as necessitated by the accompanying claims.