Title:
Portable exercise device
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable upper body exercise device utilizing two solid bars and at least one elastic band that can vary in tension and allow the user to exercise his or her muscles. The elastic bands of the exercise device stretch around the top and bottom ends of each bar. The bars act as handle bars and are gripped by the user. The user pulls the bars apart, while gripping both bars in any position from the body and at any distance from the body. The pulling of the bars away from each other will cause the user to experience muscle tension as the elastic bands attempt to reform. Repeatedly pulling the bars away from each and allowing them to return to their original position, while the bars are in any position from the body and at any distance from the body, exercises various muscles of the upper body.



Inventors:
Gatling, Marvin (New York, NY, US)
Application Number:
10/337838
Publication Date:
07/08/2004
Filing Date:
01/07/2003
Assignee:
GATLING MARVIN
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/126
International Classes:
A63B21/02; A63B21/055; (IPC1-7): A63B21/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070135269Deflectable treadle of an exercise apparatusJune, 2007Wang
20090275448GRIPPING APPARATUS FOR AN EXERCISE BARNovember, 2009Fishman
20060035753Device for determining the position of a sliding seatFebruary, 2006Baker
20070135273Weight securing systemJune, 2007Ljevaja
20060189446Elliptical step mechanismAugust, 2006Rogus
20050143229Dumbbell with removable coversJune, 2005Marr
20090163330Weighted Pom-PomJune, 2009Leetham
20050227821Aquatic exercise apparatus and method thereforOctober, 2005Powell et al.
20030092544Universal weighted conditioning garment and system for resistance trainingMay, 2003Reed
20050164857Fitness card systemJuly, 2005Black
20090023563BODY TONE EXERCISE BRICKSJanuary, 2009Liang



Primary Examiner:
DONNELLY, JEROME W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Chiumba, Caldwell (4516 Avenue M, New York, NY, 11234, US)
Claims:

What I claim as my invention is:



1. A portable exercise device comprising of two solid cylindrical bars parallel to each other.

2. A portable exercise device that conjoins the top ends and bottom ends of two solid cylindrical bars with an elastic band.

3. A portable exercise device comprising of two solid cylindrical bars that act as handle bars.

4. A portable exercise device, according to claim two, in which the elastic bands serve to create tension when the bars are gripped and pulled apart.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

[0002] Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING REFERENCE

[0003] Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISK APPENDIX

[0004] Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0005] This invention pertains to the field of the design and manufacture of a portable machine used to exercise the muscles of the human body. This invention relates generally to a lightweight and portable exercise device that enables a user to exercise upper body muscles. Specifically, this invention relates to an exercise device that employs two rigid and solid cylinders that are bound together with external tension bands. The device will enable the user to exercise different muscles in different ways.

[0006] Over the years, many portable exercising devices employing stretchable or tension cords have been developed. Although many of these devices are, in fact, portable, they are only so to the extent that they allow the user to easily transport the device. The devices do not allow the user to easily and comfortably use the device while in transport.

[0007] Some devices require the use of large, awkward and hard bars as disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,059,265 and 4,195,853 and 5,720,700. These devices can be heavy and difficult to manipulate. Other devices, though claimed to be portable, are cumbersome to transport; therefore, leaving the user to transport the device only when conveniently planned. For example, device under U.S. Pat. No. 5,720,700 is likely to be transported to and from places that are convenient for exercise regiments such as a friend's house, a beach, or a local park; or places that have been designated for exercise such as a gym or health club. The user may be reluctant to take the exercise device with him or her while, simply, traveling about. In other words, the user of the device patented under U.S. Pat. No. 5,720,700 is unlikely to transport the device to a location unless it has been designated for exercise or is commonly used for exercise. For example, the user of the device patented under U.S. Pat. No. 5,720,700 is less likely to use the device while riding public transportation to their place of employment or; for example, while sitting in a doctor's office awaiting an appointment.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0008] The advantage of this device is its small size and lightweight. These characteristics make it easy for a user to transport the device if needed. Also, the device is simple to store since it can be made to be pulled apart into smaller portions with little or no difficulty. The device is small enough to fit in the front pants pockets or back pants pockets of any normal size adult; or fit inside of most carrying bags including purses, attache cases, and back packs which are among the more popular choices for transport gear.

[0009] The weight of this device also allows for it to be transported unnoticeably. The term unnoticeably refers to the weight of the portable exercise relative to the user's body weight; and the weight of the portable exercise device relative to other objects that the user might be carrying. The portable exercise device utilizes the principals of tension to exercise muscles; thus, the device is safer to use than other devices utilizing weights. Devices utilizing weights require spotters to help the user control the weight while lifting and to protect the user against potential injury or harm during exercise where weights are required to be lifted over the body (e.g. Bench Press: an exercise for chest muscles and Military Press: a exercise for shoulder muscles, both are performed with weights). For example, when using devices that utilize weights, muscles injury or serious harm can occur if the user experiences sudden muscle fatigue or sudden muscle injury while lifting heavy weights. The portable exercise device exercises muscles utilizing tension. A user can create tension within the bands of the device. If the user should experience sudden muscle fatigue or sudden injury, the tension can be safely released.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

[0010] FIG. 1 is a front view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the first of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an inactive state (contracted bands). The back-view of the portable exercise device, while in the first assembly and in an inactive state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0011] FIG. 2 is the top view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the first of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an inactive state (contracted bands). The bottom-view of the portable exercise device, while in the first assembly and in an inactive state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0012] FIG. 3 is the left side view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the first of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an inactive state (contracted bands). The right side-view of the portable exercise device, while in the first assembly and in an inactive state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0013] FIG. 4 is a front view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the first of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an active state (expanded bands). The back-view of the portable exercise device, while in the first assembly and in an active state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0014] FIG. 5 is the top view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the first of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an active state (expanded bands). The bottom-view of the portable exercise device, while in the first assembly and in an active state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0015] FIG. 6 is the left side view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the first of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an active state (expanded bands). The right side-view of the portable exercise device, while in the first assembly and in an active state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0016] FIG. 7 is a front view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the second of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an inactive state (contracted bands). The back-view of the portable exercise device, while in the second assembly and in an inactive state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0017] FIG. 8 is the top view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the second of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an inactive state (contracted bands). The bottom-view of the portable exercise device while in the second assembly and in an inactive state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0018] FIG. 9 is the left side view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the second of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an inactive state (contracted bands). The right side-view of the portable exercise device, while in the second assembly and in an inactive state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0019] FIG. 10 is a front view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the second of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an active (expanded bands). The back-view of the portable exercise device, while in the second assembly and in an active state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0020] FIG. 11 is the top view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the second of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an active state (expanded bands). The bottom-view of the portable exercise device, while in the second assembly and in an active state, is a mirror image thereof.

[0021] FIG. 12 is the left side view of the portable exercise device. The device has been assembled with the second of two possible assemblies. The device is shown in an active state (expanded bands). The right side-view of the portable exercise device, while in the second assembly and in an active state, is a mirror image thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0022] In reference to FIG. 1 the portable exercise device is comprised of a solid first bar 1 and a solid second bar 2. The length of each bar is, but not limited to, seven inches. The width of each bar is, but not limited to, one and one-half inches. The depth of each bar is, but not limited to one and one-half inches. Each bar functions as a hand grip. The shape of the bars 1, 2 is, but not limited to, circular. The composition of the bars is, but not limited to, plastic. The density of each of bar is, but not limited to, solid. The color of the bars 1, 2 is, but not limited to, blue.

[0023] In reference to FIG. 7 the portable exercise device is comprised of at least one elastic band 3. The composition of the elastic bands is, but is not limited to, pure rubber. The shape of the bands is, but not limited to, flat. The length of a single band (if cut to form two ends and measured from end to end) is, but not limited to, six inches. The color of the bands is, but not limited to, tan.

[0024] In reference to FIG. 1 the portable exercise device can be assembled with one of two possible assemblies. To accomplish the assembly shown in FIG. 1 (Hereinafter, the assembly shown in this figure will be referred to as Assembly 1) hold both bars 1, 2 parallel to each other so that the alignment of top ends 5, 6 are flush and the alignment of the bottom ends 7, 8 are flush. While holding the bars 1, 2 and maintaining this alignment, stretch one band 3 over the top ends 5, 6 of both bars 1, 2. Adjust the band 3 so that it is approximately ¾ of an inch from the top ends 5, 6 of the bars 1, 2. While still holding the bars 1, 2 and maintaining the alignment, stretch one band 4 over the bottom ends 7, 8 of both bars 1, 2. Adjust the band 4 so that it is approximately three quarters of an inch from the bottom ends 7, 8 of the bars 1, 2.

[0025] In reference to FIG. 7 the portable exercise device can be assembled with one of two possible assemblies. To accomplish the assembly shown in FIG. 7 (Hereinafter referred to as Assembly 2) hold both bars 1, 2 parallel to each other so that the top end 6 of the second bar 2 is approximately four inches from the top end 5 of the first bar 1. While holding the bars 1, 2 and maintaining this alignment, stretch one band 3 over the top ends 5, 6 of both bars 1, 2. Adjust the band 3 so that it is approximately the same distance from the bottom end 7 of the first bar 1 and the top end 6 of the second bar 2.

[0026] In reference to FIG. 4 the portable exercise device can be used to exercise a variety of muscles. A number of exercises can be devised with the portable exercise device; however, all exercises must entail the creation of tension within the bands of the device. Specifically, exercises must entail, either, the maintaining of tension within the bands while torsion is created with the body; or the creation, maintenance, then release of tension in an alternating fashion. In reference to FIG. 4 the portable exercise device can be used to exercise the pectoral and deltoid muscles of the upper body. To exercise these muscles, one must assemble the portable exercise device in Assembly 1. Step 1: place your left hand around the first bar 1 and your right hand around the second bar 2 firmly pulling the bars 1, 2 apart. Step 2: with your hands still around the bars 1, 2, bring your hands in front of your chest so that the backs of the bars 1, 2 are facing your chest and the fronts of the bars are facing away from your chest. Step 3: while inhaling, pull the bars 1, 2 some distance apart to create a tension within the bands 3, 4. Once a tension is felt, hold the bars 1, 2 at that distance to maintain the tension. Step 4: while exhaling and maintaining the tension created in step 3, extend your hands away from your body until your elbows have locked. The path your hands will follow should mimic a pushing motion. Step 5: while inhaling and still maintaining the tension created in step 3, return your hands to your chest. The path your hands will follow should mimic a pulling motion. After completing this step your hands should be positioned as when you began in step 1. After executing steps 1, 2, and 3, repeat steps 4 and 5 continuously until a muscle fatigue can be felt in the deltoid and the pectoral muscles. The breathing portion of the previous exercise and other exercises is optional.