Title:
Holster for a hand drill
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
For holding a hand drill which has a main drill casing with a rearwardly projecting butt-end, a forwardly located chuck, and an elongate handle angularly related to and connecting with the main drill casing spaced from the rear extremity of the butt-end, a holster is provided including a lower receptacle capable of receiving a forward portion of the hand drill and preventing that forward portion from moving laterally away. Included is a means for resiliently urging the hand drill upwardly. The holster also includes an upper receptacle defining a downwardly opening aperture sized to slidingly receive the rearward butt-end of the casing. Structural members are provided to support the upper and lower receptacles at a fixed spacing, which is such that the hand drill can be stored by first inserting the forwarding portion into the first means, then pressing the hand drill downwardly against the urging of the resilient means until the butt-end slips into the aperture defined by the upper receptacle, then allowing the third means to move the hand drill upwardly so that the butt-end attains secure engagement with the upper receptacle.



Inventors:
Lammerding, Eugene (Grand Valley, CA)
Application Number:
10/289208
Publication Date:
05/13/2004
Filing Date:
11/07/2002
Assignee:
LAMMERDING EUGENE
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/251, 224/677, 224/678, 224/904
International Classes:
A45F5/00; B25H3/00; (IPC1-7): A45F5/00; A45C1/04; A45F3/00; F41C33/02; F42B39/02
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
MAI, TRI M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SHOEMAKER AND MATTARE, LTD (c/o DAVIS & BUJOLD, P.L.L.C. 112 PLEASANT STREET, CONCORD, NH, 03301, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A holster for a hand drill, the hand drill having: a main drill casing defining a rearwardly projecting butt-end, a forwardly located chuck, and an elongate handle which is angularly related to and connects with the main drill casing at a location spaced from the rear extremity of the butt-end, the holster comprising a lower receptacle defining: first means for receiving a forward portion of the hand drill at a central location, second means for restraining the forward portion against lateral movement away from said central location, third means for resiliently urging the hand drill upwardly; an upper receptacle defining: a downwardly opening aperture sized to slidingly receive the rearward butt-end of the casing; and structural means supporting the upper and lower receptacles at a fixed spacing from one another, the spacing being such, and the resilience of the third means being such, that the hand drill can be stored by first inserting said forward portion into said first means, then pressing the hand drill downwardly against the urging of the third means until the butt-end slips into said aperture defined by the upper receptacle, then allowing the third means to move the hand drill upwardly so that the butt-end attains a secure engagement with the upper receptacle.

2. The holster claimed in claim 1, in which said lower receptacle includes a sleeve member, and said first means includes a coil spring received in said sleeve member, the coil spring comprising turns of spring wire, the lower receptacle further including fourth means restraining the coil spring against moving downward past a predetermined position.

3. The holster claimed in claim 2, in which the coil spring has an upper portion where the turns of the spring wire have successively smaller radii of curvature with increasing height, terminating at an uppermost convolution sized to receive drill bits for which the hand drill is designed.

4. The holster claimed in claim 3, in which said fourth means includes an annular member secured snugly within the bottom interior of said sleeve member, the annular member having an internal diameter too small to permit passage of the coil spring.

5. The holster claimed in claim 1, in which the lower receptacle includes an outer sleeve member and an inner sleeve member, each sleeve member having an upper end and a lower end, the inner sleeve member being telescopingly slidable within the outer sleeve member, said first means comprising a downward converging cup member within the upper end of the inner sleeve member, the cup member being adapted to receive the chuck of said hand drill, and said third means comprising a coil spring urging upwardly against the combined inner sleeve member and cup member.

6. The holster claimed in claim 5, in which the lower receptacle further includes fourth means restraining the coil spring against moving downward past a predetermined position, said fourth means including an annular member secured snugly within the bottom interior of said outer sleeve member, the annular member having an internal diameter too small to permit passage of the coil spring

7. The holster claimed in claim 1, in which said structural means comprises at least one elongate member fixed with respect to said upper and lower receptacles.

8. The holster claimed in claim 1, in which said structural means comprises two elongate members fixed with respect to said upper and lower receptacles

9. The holster claimed in claim 8, in which the structural means supports the upper and lower receptacle such that, for ease of insertion and removal of the hand drill, the lower receptacle is angulated with respect to a hypothetical line joining the middle points of the two receptacles.

10. The holster claimed in claim 9, in which the angulation of the lower receptacle with respect to said hypothetical line lies between 7 degrees and 13 degrees.

11. The holster claimed in claim 10, in which said lower receptacle includes a sleeve member, and said first means includes a coil spring received in said sleeve member, the coil spring comprising turns of spring wire, the lower receptacle further including fourth means restraining the coil spring against moving downward past a predetermined position.

12. The holster claimed in claim 11, in which the coil spring has an upper portion where the turns of the spring wire have successively smaller radii of curvature with increasing height, terminating at an uppermost convolution sized to receive drill bits for which the hand drill is designed.

13. The holster claimed in claim 12, in which said fourth means includes an annular member secured snugly within the bottom interior of said sleeve member, the annular member having an internal diameter too small to permit passage of the coil spring.

14. The holster claimed in claim 9, in which the lower receptacle includes an outer sleeve member and an inner sleeve member, each sleeve member having an upper end and a lower end, the inner sleeve member being telescopingly slidable within the outer sleeve member, said first means comprising a downward converging cup member within the upper end of the inner sleeve member, the cup member being adapted to receive the chuck of said hand drill, and said third means comprising a coil spring urging upwardly against the combined inner sleeve member and cup member

15. The holster claimed in claim 5, in which the lower receptacle further includes fourth means restraining the coil spring against moving downward past a predetermined position, said fourth means including an annular member secured snugly within the bottom interior of said outer sleeve member, the annular member having an internal diameter too small to permit passage of the coil spring.

16. The holster claimed in claim 15, in which the cup member has a central opening for receiving a bit or the like gripped in the chuck of the hand drill.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] This invention relates generally to holsters for storing hand drills, and has to do particularly with a belt-mounted holster for a battery-powered hand drill, adapted to quickly and safely store the hand drill.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

[0002] The conventional T-handle of a battery-powered hand drill is designed to sit on the battery housing in a horizontal position, but tends to nave poor balance when in a vertical position because the weight of the battery at the end of the handle seeks to rotate the hand drill around a center point

[0003] For obvious safety reasons, it is very important that the hand drill be very firmly secured in the holster, which can be accomplished by a Velcro closure strap or a strap/flap with a snap-fastener

[0004] For the holster to hold the drill firmly, the fit must be tight. In the case of the larger commercial/tradesman drills (144 V and up), the fit is so tight that there is a risk of engaging the trigger of the drill during the process of inserting it into the holster This will turn on the drill, and in the case of drill bits that may protrude out of the bottom of the holster serious damage to the body may be caused, for example cutting into the skin of the leg or wrapping pant material around the rotating drill bit.

[0005] Velcro straps work well, provided they are firmly and completely engaged. However, unless they are visually checked or “felt” for, it is quite possible to only partially engage the fastener. Initially, this may seem a secure mounting, but the drill can easily work loose due to body movement which causes “flexing” of the holster The strap may also become disengaged by brushing against something, or by contact with a piece of clothing such as a jacket or a parka. Once the strap is disengaged, the weight of the battery will be able to rotate the drill out of its holster. This is a particular danger when bending down, squatting, etc

[0006] The prior art holsters described above function satisfactorily in most cases, but require considerable time and attention to ensure they are used properly and in accordance with the intention of the designer.

[0007] Velcro hooks eventually break off and/or the loops will be torn open Also there is the risk that the Velcro will become clogged with particulate material normally found around construction sites, for example sawdust, dirt particles, and fiberglass insulation.

[0008] Eventually the holding power of the Velcro drops and the strap can loosen and disengage. Subsequently, the drill will slip out and fall.

[0009] The Velcro is not “normally” replaced or repaired by the tradesman. There is a temptation to use it even if the holding power of the strap is noticeably less to the point of becoming dangerous If the drill falls out of the holster, breakage may occur. Depending upon the distance it falls, the drill may be completely destroyed. Such drills are very expensive to replace or repair.

[0010] On any construction or work site falling objects are very dangerous to other workers. In particular, hand drills have portions that tend to be sharp or pointed, especially the drill bits

[0011] Snap fasteners utilized in the prior art tend to break and wear out, by the very nature of how they work. Snap fasteners release “immediately” unlike Velcro which may still retain a weakened grip, so that it is possible to notice the drill before it is entirely released.

[0012] To insert the drill into the prior art holster (which uses Velcro), and simultaneously avoid turning on or engaging the drill by hitting the trigger, it is necessary to release the handle from a full hand grip to one which is less substantial and more awkward in which the fingers position the drill within the holster, before it is completely inserted.

[0013] The Velcro strap has to be disengaged from its “up holding” position and firmly engaged into its lock-down position

[0014] To remove the drill, the Velcro must first be disengaged from its “lock-down” position and put back into its up position (in preparation for future use and reinsertion) The drill needs to be partially removed with a finger hold until it is out far enough to be grasped fully by the hand.

[0015] If a snap lock is used, the strap/flap doesn't have a hold-up position, and once disengaged may tend to catch on the drill as it is withdrawn from the holster. When reinserting the drill, the strap may be in the way, and may need to be worked around, which is time-consuming, distracting, frustrating and possibly dangerous

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THIS INVENTION

[0016] In view of the disadvantages discussed above in connection with prior art holsters for hand drills, it is an object of one aspect of this invention to provide a holster for a hand drill which does not utilize Velcro or snaps, and which is such that a single hand suffices to lodge the hand drill firmly in the holster. Further objectives will become clear by way of the subsequent description

[0017] In particular, this invention provides a holster for a hand drill, the hand drill having: a main drill casing defining a rearwardly projecting butt-end, a forwardly located chuck, and an elongate handle which is angularly related to and connects with the main drill casing at a location spaced from the rear extremity of the butt-end, the holster comprising:

[0018] a lower receptacle defining

[0019] first means for receiving a forward portion of the hand drill at a central location, second means for restraining the forward portion against lateral movement away from said central location,

[0020] third means for resiliently urging the hand drill upwardly;

[0021] an upper receptacle defining:

[0022] a downwardly opening aperture sized to slidingly receive the rearward butt-end of the casing; and

[0023] structural means supporting the upper and lower receptacles at a fixed spacing from one another, the spacing being such, and the resilience of the third means being such, that the hand drill can be stored by first inserting said forward portion into said first means, then pressing the hand drill downwardly against the urging of the third means until the butt-end slips into said aperture defined by the upper receptacle, then allowing the third means to move the hand drill upwardly so that the butt-end attains a secure engagement with the upper receptacle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0024] Two embodiments of this invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which like numerals denote like parts throughout the several views, and in which,

[0025] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a holster for a hand drill;

[0026] FIG. 2A is a side elevational view thereof;

[0027] FIG. 2B is a further side elevational view thereof, taken in a direction perpendicular to that of FIG. 2A;

[0028] FIGS. 3a, 3b, 3c, and 3d, drawn to a smaller scale, indicate the sequential stages of the action of lodging a battery-powered hand drill in the holster of this invention; and

[0029] FIG. 4 is an axial sectional view through a bottom portion of the holster of this invention, showing an alternative embodiment

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0030] Attention is first directed to FIG. 1, which shows a holster 10 for a hand drill 12 (see FIG. 3a), it being understood that the hand drill 12 includes a main drill casing 14 defining a rearwardly projecting butt-end 16, a forwardly located chuck 18 and an elongate handle 20 which is angularly related to and connects with the main drill casing 14 at a location spaced forwardly from the rear extremity of the butt-end 16.

[0031] Returning to FIG. 1, the holster 10 is seeing to Include a lower receptacle 22 and an upper receptacle 24, along with structural means 26 supporting the upper and lower receptacles 22, 24 at a fixed spacing from one another.

[0032] The lower receptacle 22 defines a first means for receiving a forward portion of the hand drill at a central location (meaning a central location with respect to the lower receptacle 22), second means for restraining the forward portion against lateral movement away from the central location, and third means for resiliently urging the hand drill toward the upper receptacle. It should be understood that the actual position of use is one In which the receptacle 24 is positioned above the receptacle 22, as shown in the sequential drawings of FIG. 3

[0033] In the embodiment illustrated, the lower receptacle 22 is preferably provided as a cylindrical sleeve member 28, and the above-defined first means is constituted in this embodiment by a coil spring 30 comprising turns 29 of spring wire, and received in the sleeve member 28. The lower receptacle 22 further includes fourth means restraining the coil spring 30 against moving downward past a predetermined position. Looking at FIG. 2a, the above-mentioned fourth means is constituted by an annular member 31 which is secured snugly within the bottom interior of the sleeve member 28 (the rightward extremity in FIGS. 2a and 2b). The annular member 31 has an internal diameter too small to permit passage of the coil spring 30.

[0034] The above-mentioned first means for receiving a forward portion of the hand drill at a central location is constituted, in this embodiment, by arranging the turns 29 of the spring 30 to have successively smaller radii of curvature with increasing height, terminating at an uppermost convolution 32 sized to receive drill bits for which the hand drill is designed.

[0035] The upper receptacle 24 defines a “downwardly” opening aperture 40 which is sized to slidingly receive the rearward butt-end 16 of the casing 14.

[0036] The previously mentioned structural means 26 supporting the upper and loser receptacles at a fixed spacing is constituted, in the first embodiment, by stiff, Substantially parallel, opposed, elongate plastic members which are firmly secured, as by plastic welding, heat welding, etc., to both the lower receptacle 22 and the upper receptacle 24.

[0037] FIGS. 1 and 2 show an attachment pad 33 attached to the upper receptacle 24 by bolts or the like. The pad 33 is preferably of leather or flexible plastic, and has slots 34 through which a belt (not illustrated) can be fed.

[0038] It will be noted that the lower receptacle 22 is angulated with respect to a hypothetical line 36 joining the middle points of the two receptacles 22, 24 (see FIG. 2a and FIG. 3a). This angulation facilitates the lodging of the hand drill 12 with respect to the lower receptacle 22, and can be visualized by inspecting FIGS. 2a and 3a. Without being bound by specific numbers, it is generally considered that the lower receptacle 22 should be angulated to between 7° and 13° with respect to the hypothetical line 36.

[0039] Attention is now directed to FIGS. 3a to 3d, for an explanation of how a hand drill is stored in the holster of this invention.

[0040] In FIG. 3a, the hand drill 12 is positioned such that a bit 42 is in close proximity to the uppermost convolution 32 of the coil spring 30, and the hand drill is generally sloped in the same direction as the slope of the lower receptacle 30 (upward and to the right, as drawn in FIGS. 3a-3d).

[0041] The upper receptacle in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3a-3d, provides a widening of the aperture 40 by removing a roughly triangular portion at 45.

[0042] In FIG. 3b, the bit 42 is then inserted into the uppermost convolution 32 of the coil spring 30 and the hand drill 12 is pushed downward by the operator against the upward urging of the spring 30. Depending on the length of the bit 42, the bit 42 may protrude as needed out of the bottom of the lower receptacle 22, as the spring 30 compresses.

[0043] In FIG. 3c, the spring 30 is sufficiently compressed to allow the hand drill butt-end 16 to clear the cut-out 45 of the upper receptacle 24 as it is moved into alignment with a hypothetical center line 36 joining the lower receptacle 22 with the upper receptacle 24.

[0044] In FIG. 3d, the operator eases up the downward pressure on the hand drill 12 and allows the coil spring 30 to lift the hand drill 12 upwardly so that the butt-end 16 lodges within the upper receptacle 24, with the handle 20 pressing against the cut-out 45 of the upper receptacle 24.

[0045] In order to remove the hand drill from the holster, the sequence of steps shown in FIG. 3 is simply reversed (FIG. 3d, FIG. 3c, FIG. 3b, and FIG. 3a).

[0046] Attention is now directed to FIG. 4, showing the second embodiment of this invention.

[0047] In FIG. 4, only the lower receptacle is illustrated, at the numeral 22a The upper receptacle 24 is unchanged The lower receptacle 22a includes an outer sleeve member 50 and an inner sleeve member 52 Each sleeve member 50, 52 has an upper end and a lower end, and the inner sleeve member 52 is telescopingly slideable within the outer sleeve member 50.

[0048] The previously mentioned “first means” for receiving a forward portion of the hand dill is constituted, in the second embodiment shown in FIG. 4, by a downwardly converging cup member 54 located within the upper end of the inner sleeve member 52, with the cup member 54 being adapted to receive the chuck of a hand drill. The previously mentioned “third means” includes, in the second embodiment, a coil spring 30a which urges upwardly against the combined inner sleeve member 52 and the cup member 54 Preferably, the inner sleeve member 52 is securely fixed to the cup member 54, as by welding or the like, or molded in one piece.

[0049] The second embodiment shown in FIG. 4 further includes a fourth means which restrains the coil spring 30 against moving downward past a predetermined position In the second embodiment this means involves an annular member 56 secured snugly within the bottom interior of the outer sleeve member 50. The annular member 56 has an internal diameter too small to permit passage of the coil spring 30a.

[0050] Looking at FIG. 4, it will be seen that the cup member 54 has a central opening 63 at the apex, to allow passage of drill bits or other elongated portions (screwdriver bits, etc.) which may need to be allowed for.

[0051] While two embodiments of this invention have been illustrated in the accompanying drawings and described hereinabove, it will be evident to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the essence of this invention, as set forth in the appended claims.