Title:
Portable incendiary apparatus
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable incendiary apparatus. The apparatus may include a combustible container having an interior; a separator dividing the interior into a plurality of burn chambers; and, flammable contents contained within at least one of the burn chambers. The apparatus may include flammable contents; and, a combustible, substantially planar member holding the flammable materials and defining at least one extension positioned with respect to the materials so as to promote ignition of the flammable contents upon ignition of the apparatus. The apparatus may include a combustible container; a separator dividing the container into a plurality of burn chambers and partially extending from the container so as to facilitate ignition of the apparatus; and, at least one container extension for promoting ignition of the at least one firelog upon ignition of the apparatus and facilitating transporting of the apparatus.



Inventors:
Taylor, Henry Michael (Biglerville, PA, US)
Application Number:
10/445304
Publication Date:
05/13/2004
Filing Date:
05/22/2003
Assignee:
TAYLOR HENRY MICHAEL
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
44/534
International Classes:
C10L11/00; C10L11/04; C10L11/06; C10L; (IPC1-7): C10L11/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
ANTHONY, JOSEPH DAVID
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Reed Smith, Esq. Llp Marc Farrell J. (213 Market Street, 9th Floor, Harrisburg, PA, 17108-1844, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A portable incendiary apparatus comprising: a combustible container having an interior; a combustible separator defining a plurality of burn chambers within said container; and, flammable contents contained within at least one of said burn chambers.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said container comprises a plurality of panels.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said panels form a wedge.

4. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said panels form a three-sided tube.

5. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein at least some of said panels are unitarily formed.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein a folded substrate forms at least two of said panels.

7. The apparatus of claim 6, wherein said substrate comprises corrugated kraft paper.

8. The apparatus of claim 7, wherein said substrate further comprises a wax coating.

9. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein said panels comprise at least one side panel integrally formed with at least one other panel.

10. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein each side panel comprises at least one aperture therein.

11. The apparatus of claim 10, wherein at least one other of said panels comprises a tab suitable for securing with said aperture.

12. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein said at least one side panel is secured to at least one other of said panels.

13. The apparatus of claim 12, further comprising a fastener securing said at least one side panel to said at least one other panel.

14. The apparatus of claim 12, further comprising an adhesive securing said at least one side panel to said at least one other panel.

15. The apparatus of claim 14, wherein said adhesive is food grade.

16. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said container consists of a unitary substrate.

17. The apparatus of claim 2, further comprising at least one aperture adjacent to at least three of said panels.

18. The apparatus of claim 2, further comprising at least one air vent in at least one of said panels.

19. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said panels comprise: two side panels; a bottom panel; two end panels; and, at least one vent aperture in each said end panel; wherein, said container further comprises a plurality of corner apertures each adjacent to a side panel, bottom panel and end panel.

20. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein at least two of said panels form a flag.

21. The apparatus of claim 20, wherein said flag comprises a handle aperture.

22. The apparatus of claim 21, wherein said flag is of sufficient height so as to resist rapid burning.

23. The apparatus of claim 22, wherein said flag is at least approximately 3″ tall at a lowest point, and approximately 5″ tall at a highest point.

24. The apparatus of claim 23, wherein said handle aperture is at least approximately 1″ from each edge of said flag.

25. The apparatus of claim 24, wherein an upper edge of said flag is die cut into a flame pattern.

26. The apparatus of claim 25, wherein said flame pattern is approximately 1¾″ tall.

27. The apparatus of claim 26, wherein said flame pattern comprises two tapered ends.

28. The apparatus of claim 27, wherein each of said tapered ends ramps at a different rate.

29. The apparatus of claim 20, further comprising means for partially securing said at least two of said panels to form said flag.

30. The apparatus of claim 20, further comprising at least one fastener partially securing said at least two of said panels to form said flag.

31. The apparatus of claim 20, further comprising at least one adhesive partially securing said at least two of said panels to form said flag.

32. The apparatus of claim 31, wherein said adhesive partially securing said at least two of said panels to form said flag is food grade.

33. The apparatus of claim 2, further comprising at least two of said panels extending from said container so as to promote ignition of said flammable contents upon ignition of said apparatus.

34. The apparatus of claim 2, further comprising at least one wick extending from at least one of said panels.

35. The apparatus of claim 2, further comprising a plurality of wicks each extending from a corresponding one of said panels.

36. The apparatus of claim 34, wherein said wick is integrally formed with said separator.

37. The apparatus of claim 35, wherein said wicks are integrally formed with said separator.

38. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said contents comprise fire logs.

39. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said separator forms at least three burn chambers and said contents comprise six firelogs.

40. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said contents are selected from the group consisting of: petroleum products, natural firelogs, artificial firelogs, sawdust, paper, leaves, grasses, coffee grounds and combustible gels.

41. A portable incendiary apparatus comprising: flammable contents; and, a combustible, substantially planar member holding said flammable materials and defining at least one extension positioned with respect to said materials so as to promote ignition of said flammable contents upon ignition of said apparatus.

42. The apparatus of claim 41, further comprising a wick extending from said member to facilitate ignition of said apparatus.

43. The apparatus of claim 42, wherein said wick divides said contents into a plurality of burn chambers.

44. An apparatus for transporting and facilitating ignition of at least one firelog comprising: a combustible container; a separator dividing said container into a plurality of burn chambers and partially extending from said container so as to facilitate ignition of said apparatus; and, at least one container extension for promoting ignition of said at least one firelog upon ignition of said apparatus and facilitating transporting of said apparatus.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This application claims priority of co-pending United States Patent Application Serial No. 60/382,475, entitled “PORTABLE INCENDIARY APPARATUS”, filed May 22, 2002, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference as if being set forth in its entirety herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention relates generally to the field of fire making, and more specifically to a portable, easy to light incendiary apparatus.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Reliable lighting of fires is widely recognized as problematic. Where the fire involves natural or artificial firelogs, the problem is particularly difficult. Because natural firelogs are dense, and artificial firelogs are made from compressed materials, air content of most firelogs is insufficient to promote unassisted ignition. To remedy this problem, many consumers commonly turn to unsafe methods of improving ignition, including use of flammable liquids such as charcoal lighter and even gasoline. Indeed, even manufacturers of artificial logs typically add petroleum and other combustible materials to the artificial firelogs or to the firelog packaging.

[0004] Various patented methods have been used to attempt easier lighting of artificial firelogs. For example, in U.S. Pat. No. 2,789,890 to Stevens, an artificial fireplace log is disclosed which uses used crank case oil as combustible material and mixes the combustible material with the material used to form the bulk of the firelog. The combustible material of the Stevens device is used to promote combustion of the log. Also included in the prior art is an artificial firelog having a groove formed along its length in which is placed and retained a quantity of a mixture containing diesel fuel. The primary disadvantage of the diesel fuel is its low flash point of between 100° F. and 190° F. These artificial firelogs are often shipped and stored in closed containers and subjected to elevated temperatures, which presents an added danger of unintended ignition of the log.

[0005] U.S. Pat. No. 3,726,651 to Ronden discloses the use of multiple grooves to increase the surface area of the artificial firelog, as well as a quick-lighting combustible chemical material mixed in with the log. The combustible chemical material provided in Ronden is either sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, or potassium chlorate. All three of these chemical materials are strong oxidizers which supply their own oxygen for burning, and do not require an additional external air supply for combustion. However, these chemical materials are generally hazardous or toxic, making the firelogs and the resulting fire unsuitable for cooking food over open flames. Additionally, use of these chemicals makes the firelogs subject to strict governmental regulations regarding labeling and safety precautions, and may also run afoul of individual park and campground rules regarding materials permitted for use in open fires.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 3,988,121 to Levekis discloses a firelog having an igniter pellet. A groove in the igniter pellet is used as a recess into which a highly flammable and toxic peroxide-cellulosic powder is placed and retained by compaction. As in Ronden, Leveskis incorporates chemical materials that are extremely hazardous in manufacturing, transport and end use. The nitrate used in Ronden's process is potentially explosive, and the peroxide used in the Leveskis process is not only potentially explosive, but also highly toxic. Neither product is designed to be ignited with a wrapper covering the product.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 4,104,034 to Wu discloses the use of a flap on a combustible firelog wrapper. The device of Wu is capable of being ignited while inside its wrapper, and at a minimum requires that a means of supporting the combustible material adjacent the groove and spaced from the log be supplied. Wu also teaches use of a flap integrally formed from the material used to wrap the fireplace log.

[0008] Notably, all of these prior art inventions are geared towards manipulation of the design of the artificial firelogs themselves to promote easier lighting. Therefore, a need exists for a device that allows the easy ignition of a fire, regardless of the composition of the material to be burned. A need also exists for a portable incendiary apparatus, kit or the like that is not only easy to light, but can easily and conveniently be carried by hand, enabling it to be readily transported and used to reliably create a fire in a variety of settings.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] A portable incendiary apparatus including: a combustible container having an interior; a separator dividing the interior into a plurality of burn chambers; and, flammable contents contained within at least one of the burn chambers.

[0010] A portable incendiary apparatus including: flammable contents; and, a combustible, substantially planar member holding the flammable materials and defining at least one extension positioned with respect to the materials so as to promote ignition of the flammable contents upon ignition of the apparatus.

[0011] An apparatus for transporting and facilitating ignition of at least one firelog including: a combustible container; a separator dividing the container into a plurality of burn chambers and partially extending from the container so as to facilitate ignition of the apparatus; and, at least one container extension for promoting ignition of the at least one firelog upon ignition of the apparatus and facilitating transporting of the apparatus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

[0012] Understanding of the present invention will be facilitated by consideration of the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the present invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which like numerals refer to like parts, and:

[0013] FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of a first embodiment of the present invention;

[0014] FIG. 2 is a front side elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

[0015] FIG. 3 is a rear side elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

[0016] FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

[0017] FIG. 5 is a bottom plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

[0018] FIG. 6 is a right end elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

[0019] FIG. 7 is a left end elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

[0020] FIG. 8 is a top perspective view of a second embodiment of the present invention;

[0021] FIG. 9 is a front side elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8;

[0022] FIG. 10 is a rear side elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8;

[0023] FIG. 11 is a top plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8;

[0024] FIG. 12 is a bottom plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8;

[0025] FIG. 13 is a right end elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8;

[0026] FIG. 14 is a left end elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8;

[0027] FIG. 15 is a top perspective view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8, showing an open side panel and the interior of the container;

[0028] FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional side view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8, showing the internal components including the wick body and flammable contents comprised of artificial firelogs; and

[0029] FIG. 17 is a design schematic which illustrates a method for manufacture of the apparatus shown in FIG. 8. The design schematic provides measurements for a particular scale of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8. However, the measurements may be adjusted to provide an apparatus having larger or smaller dimensions to meet the needs of a particular use.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0030] According to an aspect of the present invention, a novel and distinct portable incendiary apparatus, which can be used to light a combustible material, may be provided. According to an aspect of the present invention, a container, one or more wicks, and flammable contents including, but not limited to natural or artificial firelogs and the like, may be provided.

[0031] According to an aspect of the present invention, a unique arrangement and interaction of the container, flag, wick, and flammable contents, such as firelogs, provides a self-contained portable incendiary apparatus, which is easy to light without the aid of any internal or external combustible fluids or chemicals. According to an aspect of the present invention, an apparatus may be provided that is therefore safe to transport, and easy to store even in adverse environmental conditions. The present invention thus provides, according to an aspect, a method for making a fire that is environmentally-friendly, easy, convenient, safe and effective.

[0032] It is to be understood that the figures and descriptions of the present invention have been simplified to illustrate elements that are relevant for a clear understanding of the present invention, while eliminating, for purposes of clarity, many other elements found in conventional incendiary devices and methods, such as firelogs. Those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that other elements are desirable and/or required in order to implement the present invention. However, because such elements are well known in the art, and because they do not facilitate a better understanding of the present invention, a discussion of such elements is not provided herein. The disclosure herein is directed to all such variations and modifications to such systems and methods known to those skilled in the art.

[0033] Referring now to the numerous figures, wherein like references refer to like elements of the invention, an embodiment of an apparatus of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 1-7. Referring now to FIG. 1, a container 20 having a body 30 may be provided. Body 30 may take any suitable shape. For example, body 30 may be of any size and shape capable of holding flammable contents for the desired type of fire. In the non-limiting and preferred embodiments shown in the figures, container 20 may generally take the form of a substantially triangular body 30 of sufficient size and shape so as to hold, for example, three firelogs (shown in FIG. 16) in a pyramidal configuration. Body 30 may include front panel 60, bottom panel 70 and rear panel 80.

[0034] Referring now also to FIG. 2, there is shown a front side elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 further illustrating panel 60. Referring now also to FIG. 3, there is shown a rear side elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 further illustrating panel 80. Referring now also to FIG. 4, there is shown a top plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 further illustrating panels 60 and 80. And, referring now also to FIG. 5, there is shown a bottom plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 further illustrating panel 70.

[0035] Referring now to FIGS. 1-5, panels 60, 70 and 80 may be secured in the shape of container 20, in the illustrated non-limiting case a generally triangular (or three sided, or wedge-like) tube, by a plurality of side panels 90. Referring now also to FIGS. 6 and 7, there are shown two end elevational views of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1, respectively, each further illustrating a side panel 90. Referring now also to FIG. 15, side panels 90 may include a plurality of slots 94 for receiving tabs 62 extending from front panel 60 and rear panel 80 for example. Alternatively, or in addition thereto, side panels 90 may be affixed to front panel 60 and rear panel 80 by any known means, including but not limited to folding, fasteners, adhesives, glue, and the like. Body 30 may be largely formed by the folded assembly of a contiguous front panel 60, bottom panel 70 and rear panel 80. Container 20 may be constructed as a single, unitary piece having the folding arrangement as shown in the illustrated embodiments, or as discrete panels.

[0036] Referring again to FIGS. 1-7, corner apertures 72 on each corner of body 30 where bottom panel 70 and side panels 90 meet front panel 60 or rear panel 80 may be provided. Further, air vents 100 formed at the top of each side panel 90 may also be provided.

[0037] Container 20 is made of combustible material such as corrugated kraft paper. An outer surface 25 of container 20 may include a waterproof coating, such as wax, which resists wetting of the container and promotes controlled burning of the container to better ensure ignition of flammable contents contained therein. Outer surface 25 may further include printed indicia indicative of the flammable nature and use of container 20 and its contents.

[0038] Referring now to FIGS. 1-4, 6 and 7, front panel 60 and rear panel 80 may join to form flag 40 having a vertical section which extends substantially along the entire length of the top of body 30. Flag 40 serves to control and contain fire within body 30 until the flammable contents are sufficiently ignited. Flag 40 has been shown to facilitate a controlled burning of body 30 prior to ignition of flag 40, thereby producing a higher temperature within body 30 and encouraging full ignition of the flammable contents thereof. By way of non-limiting example only, tests conducted show that container 20 may burn for approximately five minutes before being entirely consumed, leaving no container residue in one non-limiting embodiment.

[0039] In the non-limiting embodiments shown in the figures, flag 40 includes a first tapered end 44, a second tapered end 46 and a top edge 48. First tapered end 44 may be more tapered than second tapered end 46, as can be seen by comparison to the side edges of front panel 60. Flag 40 may also include one or more flag handle apertures 42.

[0040] Additionally, flag 40 is preferably of sufficient height so as to resist rapid burning, and is most preferably at least approximately 3″ tall at its lowest point, and approximately 5″ tall at its highest point. In a preferred embodiment, the flag height is sufficient to allow approximately 1″ of solid flag from its uppermost edge 48 to the bottom of the flag handle 42, approximately 1¼″ for flag handle 42, and 1″ between the bottom of flag handle 42 and the point at which front panel 60 and rear panel 80 join to form flag 40. This particular configuration permits uppermost edge 48 of flag 40 to be die cut into a flame pattern approximately 1¾″ tall. It also provides a variation of zero flag at both tapered ends 44, 46 ramping up in height at two different rates to a maximum of 5″, and ramping down in height at two different rates to 1″ of flag in the center 2¾″ section of the container. An advantage of such a particular flag construction is that it produces a reliable carrying means, and also reliably controls the rate of burning of container 20.

[0041] In addition to the shape of flag 40, it has been shown that the functional performance of flag 40 bears a relationship to the means used for joining the extending portions of front panel 60 and rear panel 80 to form flag 40. In order to serve as a means for carrying the apparatus, flag 40 must be of sufficient strength and durability so as to support installation of flag handle 42, as well as the subsequent carrying by hand of a complete apparatus, i.e., one that includes both container 20 and the material(s) to be burned therein. Additionally, flag 40 must be sufficiently dense so as to burn slowly. Moreover, if the flag attachment means burns prematurely, the flames may ultimately fail to be sufficiently contained with body 30 so as to achieve desirable or adequate ignition of the material to be burned. Therefore, a strong, durable, reliable, and slow burning flag attachment means is preferred.

[0042] Any strong, durable and reliable flag attachment means known to those skilled in the art may be used, including but not limited to adhesives, staples, thread, rope, plastic fasteners, rivets and the like. Preferably, the flag attachment means is non-toxic when burned, and leaves no residue, or substantially no residue. In a preferred embodiment, the attachment means may include a blend of starch based “food grade” adhesives containing flame retardants such as, for example, calcium and calcium based compounds which are known and frequently used in “food grade” corrugate. Such an adhesive may be applied by any known method, such as through the use of an industrial gluer that delivers a sufficiently uniform quantity and dispersion of adhesive to produce a consistent attachment. In one particular embodiment, corn starch-based adhesive such as H.P. Fuller cold set may be applied over a misted layer of calcium carbonate. Application of the starch-based adhesive in such a manner provides a strong, durable, reliable, and slow burning flag 40.

[0043] Referring now to FIGS. 8-15 there is shown an embodiment of an apparatus of the present invention largely analogous to that shown in FIGS. 1-7. More particularly: FIG. 8 shows an analogous view to that of FIG. 1, FIG. 9 shows an analogous view to that of FIG. 2, FIG. 10 shows an analogous view to that of FIG. 3, FIG. 11 shows an analogous view to that of FIG. 4, FIG. 12 shows an analogous view to that of FIG. 3, FIG. 13 shows an analogous view to that of FIG. 5, FIG. 14 shows an analogous view to that of FIG. 6, and FIG. 15 shows an analogous view to that of FIG. 7. Accordingly, a discussion of the like elements will not be repeated.

[0044] Referring now to FIG. 8, container 20 may be seen to include one or more wicks 50. Inclusion of wicks 50 has been shown to be integral to improved performance of an incendiary apparatus according to an aspect of the present invention. Wick 50 may include a combustible material, and be of any type known to those skilled in the art. For example, wick 50 may be composed of a material analogous to that of body 30, or a material having a burn-rate that compliments body 30, for example. Wick 50 preferably is of sufficient length so that when positioned within container 20, wick ends 52 extend through apertures 92 on each side panel 90 of container 20.

[0045] Referring now also to FIG. 16, a body of wick 50 may be contained within body 30 of container 20, and extend throughout the interior length of container 20 so as to separate the flammable contents and form burn chambers. When the materials to be combusted are firelogs 120, for example, wick 50 may be positioned within container 20 along the length of firelogs 120 as shown in the non-limiting case of FIG. 16. to promote even and complete ignition thereof.

[0046] By reason of the location and positioning of wick 50 and wick ends 52 relative to the overall container 20 and to the materials to be burned, even and complete ignition thereof is promoted. That is, wick ends 52 may easily be ignited, which in turn causes the body of wick 50 and the flammable contents of container 20, such as firelogs 120, to become uniformly lighted in a very short time. The tapering of first end 44 of flag 40 and second end 46 of flag 40 may serve to resist premature flame transfer from body 30, especially from side panels 90 which are adjacent to wick 50. Once a wick end 52 is lit, the flame may advance in a predictable fashion to provide initial flame fronts on tapered ends 44, 46 of flag 40, then to the center portion of the flag 40 flame channel and finally to the tallest sections and top edge 48 of flag 40. While this combination has proven successful in an array of fire receptacles, a number of variations to the flag size and shape are contemplated and dimensions may be adjusted by one skilled in the art to compensate for differences in size, shape, and draft of fire receptacles as well as for size, shape and makeup of flammable materials within container 20. The present invention should not be construed as being limited to the particular flag and container configurations as shown in the non-limiting figures.

[0047] As set forth, the flammable contents of container 20 may include a plurality of natural or artificial firelogs. These firelogs may be of any type known to those skilled in the art, including but not limited to compressed combustible materials such as petroleum and petroleum wastes, sawdust, paper, leaves, grasses and coffee grinds. If firelogs are used as the combustible contents, they may be intact or they may be broken to increase surface area available for exposure to flame. For example, three full firelogs or six half firelogs may be configured in a pyramid fashion within container 20. Alternatively, flammable contents included within container 20 may comprise alcohol gels and other flammable materials which exhibit controlled, prolonged combustion characteristics. According to an aspect of the present invention, the included flammable contents may contain no added chemical materials or accelerants such as oxidizers, petroleum, wax and the like, and be formed of recycled sawdust and waste wood although flammable contents which do contain such are by no means excluded from the scope of the present invention.

[0048] The construction, arrangement and relationship of body 30, flag 40 and wick 50 to one another enable the easy ignition of flammable contents such as compressed wood firelogs which, by themselves, may otherwise be difficult to ignite. In order to achieve optimal ignition, several conditions ought to exist. First, an adequate supply of oxygen should be provided. This requirement is met by corner apertures 72 on each corner of body 30 where bottom panel 70 and side panels 90 meet front panel 60 or rear panel 80, and also by the air vents 100 formed at the top of each side panel 90.

[0049] Second, the flammable contents within container 20 should readily and easily catch fire. To ignite any flammable material, a flame may be provided in close proximity to the surface of the material. However, the mere presence of a flame in close proximity to the surface of the material to be burned may not be enough to cause its ignition. Some flammable materials, such as natural or artificial firelogs for example, may be difficult to ignite by themselves. Without some type of accelerant or a flame source possessing an extremely high temperature, it may take a significant amount of time before such materials will ignite. Other materials, such as candle wax, would burn or melt very quickly, absent the presence of a wick or the like. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, wick 50 solves these problems, as well as enhances the oxygen requirement.

[0050] Referring again to FIGS. 8-15, each of wick ends 52 can be ignited, causing flames to burn through the respective side apertures 92 to wick body 54. The burning of wick body 54 pulls air through corner apertures 72 and air vents 100, encouraging combustion of wick body 54 and the flammable contents inside of body 30. As shown in FIG. 16, wick body 54 preferably spaces the flammable contents (such as firelogs 120) to create burn chambers which are fueled by air flow between and around the flammable contents. Wick body 54 therefore allows air to reach the middle portions of container body 30 and its flammable contents, rather than just the side ends of body 30.

[0051] Third, for successful ignition, the flammable contents must reach ignition temperature. This is difficult with known firelogs, but especially difficult with compressed wood firelogs having no combustible chemical additives or fluids. Moreover, firelogs have relatively poor heat transfer characteristics, so that if any of the heat from lighting is transferred away from the firelog, it may never reach ignition temperature. The air space provided by wick body 54 and the insulating characteristics of flag 40 facilitate maintenance of heat within body 30 to allow the firelogs to reach ignition temperature before body 30 and the entire container 20 burn away.

[0052] Lastly, as flames escape upwardly from air vents 100, the tapering of first and second tapered ends 44 and 46 prevents flag 40 from being prematurely ignited and quickly burned. Were flag 40 to have substantially straight, vertical edges as opposed to being tapered at its ends, it may catch fire prematurely, and then burn across its length fairly rapidly. A likely result would be that front panel 60 and rear panel 80 would detach from one another at the point where they had been joined to form flag 40, causing container 20 to open and thus prematurely expose the flammable materials contained therein. Such premature exposure may essentially defeat the heat-containment function of container 20, and thereby prevent the temperature from rising to a level which is high enough to cause ignition of the firelogs or other flammable contents.

[0053] The embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 8 is one embodiment of a finished portable incendiary apparatus of the present invention which, by reason of combustible container 20, and the design of body 30, flag 40, flag handle 42 and wick 50 is easy to carry, easy to light, convenient, safe to use, and produces a portable and reliable fire source having a burn time of approximately 1-3 hours when used in an appropriately drafted fire receptacle such as a fireplace or campfire. The burn time can be adjusted by selection of the combustible materials that make up container 20 itself as well as the flammable contents to be burned within container 20. The burn time may also be altered by adjusting the scale size of the apparatus and its contents, by adjusting the size, shape and/or location of apertures 72 and air vents 100, or by adjusting the draft of the fire receptacle.

[0054] The present invention thus produces an easy lighting fire apparatus that is safe and convenient to transport, store, and use. The apparatus is particularly suited for making fires in fireplaces, camping, burn barrels, bonfires and any location or situation suitable for making a controlled fire. In a more preferred embodiment, wherein container 20 is constructed of corrugated paper and assembled with non-toxic glue, and wherein the flammable materials are compressed wood firelogs, the apparatus is perfectly suited for use in state and national parks since no residue remains. Such embodiment is also perfectly suited for making fires for cooking food, since no toxins result from the burning of the apparatus. Accordingly, that embodiment is suited for military use and for survival and rescue kits.

[0055] Those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that many modifications and variations of the present invention may be implemented without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Thus, it is intended that the present invention covers the modifications and variations of this invention provided they come within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents.