Title:
Pictorial rendering of a concept
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A technique is provided for producing a pictorial rendering of a concept using only components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language: The concept may alternatively be a concrete object or an abstract notion. The technique includes steps of displaying on a first surface the entire printed title designating the concept to be depicted in the pictorial rendering such that the printed title is comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components and applying onto a second surface distant from the first surface, a representation of each of the individual distinctly contoured components in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title. The individual distinctly contoured components variously include letters or symbols of the alphabet.



Inventors:
Vaillancourt, Richard R. (Westerly, RI, US)
Application Number:
10/260671
Publication Date:
04/01/2004
Filing Date:
09/30/2002
Assignee:
VAILLANCOURT RICHARD R.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
G09B11/00; (IPC1-7): A63F9/10
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
WONG, STEVEN B
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
RICHARD R. VAILLANCOURT (4 LINKS PASSAGE, WESTERLY, RI, 02891, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A method of producing a pictorial rendering of a concept using only components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language comprising the steps of: (a) displaying on a first surface the entire printed title designating the concept to be depicted in the pictorial rendering such that the printed title is comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components; and (b) applying onto a second surface distant from the first surface, a representation of each of the individual distinctly contoured components in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title.

2. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the concept is a concrete object.

3. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the concept is an abstract notion.

4. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the individual distinctly contoured components include numbers or letters or symbols of the alphabet of the vernacular language.

5. A method as set forth in claim 1 including the steps of: (c) providing on a third surface removable representations of each of the individual distinctly contoured components which comprise the entire printed title of step (a); and (d) selectively removing from the third surface the representation of each of the individual distinctly contoured components for application to the second surface according to step (b).

6. A method as set forth in claim 5 including the steps of: (e) providing each of the removable representations of step (c) with an adhesive backing; and (f) employing the adhesive backing, attaching the removable representations to the second surface according to step (b).

7. A method as set forth in claim 5 wherein the third surface includes: an underlying support layer; and an adhesively-backed overlying layer in contiguous contact with the support layer; and including the step of: (e) scoring the overlying layer to outline each of the representations of the individual distinctly contoured components to enable their removal from the support layer according to step (d).

8. A system for producing a pictorial rendering of a concept using only components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language comprising: a first surface; an entire printed title designating the concept to be depicted in the pictorial rendering displayed on the first surface comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components; and a second surface distant from the first surface onto which is applied a representation of each of the individual distinctly contoured components in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title.

9. A method as set forth in claim 8 wherein the concept is a concrete object.

10. A method as set forth in claim 8 wherein the concept is an abstract notion.

11. A system as set forth in claim 8 wherein the individual distinctly contoured components include numbers or letters or symbols of the alphabet of the vernacular language.

12. A system as set forth in claim 8 including: a third surface on which are provided selectively removable representations of each of the individual distinctly contoured components which comprise the entire printed title for application to the second surface such that the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title.

13. A system as set forth in claim 12 wherein each of the removable representations is provided with an adhesive backing for attaching the removable representations to the second surface.

14. A system as set forth in claim 12 wherein the third surface includes: an underlying support layer; and an adhesively-backed overlying layer in contiguous contact with the support layer, the overlying layer being scored to outline each of the representations of the individual distinctly contoured components to enable their removal from the support layer.

15. A system as set forth in claim 12 including: an instruction manual for describing the creative process involved in producing the pictorial rendering of a concept with components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language; a supply of sheets having the nature of the first surface providing a plurality of printed titles of objects as designated in the vernacular language; a supply of sheets having the nature of the second surface for receiving the individual distinctly contoured components; and a supply of sheets including the third surface; all of the mentioned items together comprising a kit.

16. A game of producing a pictorial rendering of a concept using only components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language comprising: a reception surface; and a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components taken from the printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language and relatively positioned such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title.

17. A method as set forth in claim 16 wherein the concept is a concrete object.

18. A method as set forth in claim 16 wherein the concept is an abstract notion.

19. A game as set forth in claim 16 wherein the individual distinctly contoured components include numbers or letters or symbols of the alphabet of the vernacular language.

20. A game as set forth in claim 16 including: a source surface on which are provided selectively removable representations of each of the individual distinctly contoured components which comprise the entire printed title for application to the reception surface such that the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title.

21. A game as set forth in claim 20 wherein each of the removable representations is provided with an adhesive backing for attaching the removable representations to the second surface.

22. A game as set forth in claim 20 wherein the source surface includes: an underlying support layer; and an adhesively-backed overlying layer in contiguous contact with the support layer, the overlying layer being scored to outline each of the representations of the individual distinctly contoured components to enable their removal from the support layer.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention relates generally to a technique for producing a pictorial rendering of a concept, either an abstract notion, or a concrete object with components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language and also to a system, including a kit, for achieving such a desirable result.

[0003] 2. Description of the Prior Art

[0004] Over the years, there have been numerous attempts to construct words from letters. Indeed, numerous word games have been developed for play by groups of individuals. These games, such as Scrabble®, are both educational and informative insofar as they require the players to compose words formed with a limited number of letter tiles and board space. For example, in the Scrabble® game, words are formed using single-letter tiles selectively placed in spaces on a two-dimensional matrix printed on a playing board. Scoring is determined by point values assigned to the letter tiles as well as bonuses assigned to some of the letter spaces, that is, double and triple letter spaces. The point value assigned to a letter depends upon the frequency of use of the letter in the language. For example, an “x” has a higher assigned value than does an “e”. While the Scrabble® game has enjoyed substantial commercial success, word formation is relatively simple because each tile contains only one letter. Furthermore, scoring is primarily based on letter usage, rather than on word length.

[0005] An early instance of physically connecting physical objects with their alphanumeric representations can be seen in U.S. Pat. No. 257,630 which issued May 9, 1882 to Whitney. In this instance, the invention comprises making the various blocks of a set of alphabet or toy blocks of such shape and relative proportion as to represent various proportional subdivisions of a straight line of given length, and of a circle whose diameter bears a certain proportion to the given straight line, and so that they are capable of representing by combination with each other the different letters of the alphabet, the various numerals, and other figures or characters commonly used in print in regular proportion and on a uniform scale. The child or learner using the blocks, instead of selecting a block representing in itself a completed letter or character; as with the alphabet-blocks then in common use, may be furnished with or may select the blocks of this set which together represent the desired letter or character, and may then construct it for himself or herself.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 1,541,004 which issued Jun. 9, 1925 to Taylor discloses an alphabetical toy particularly adapted for young children, with the stated two-fold object of providing instruction and entertainment. It is a device composed of a plurality of sections, in the form of straight flat bars, pivotally joined together and so arranged that by proper manipulation may be made to form the letters of the alphabet and numerals from one to nine. Its use is said to be particularly efficacious in kindergarten work wherein the entertaining feature of individual manipulation of the bars to form letters and numerals is a great aid to instruction. Also, formation of the letters by the individual child in thus manner is conducive to more rapid learning, by compelling concentration, and affords an opportunity to visualize the manner of forming each letter and numeral.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 2,491,164 issued Dec. 13, 1949 to Direkx discloses an educational device in which any one of several different pictures or subjects may be interchangeably formed by selectively folding over suitably designated marginal segments or tabs which project from a suitable support.

[0008] A sheet of paper, cardboard, or the like, which has a series of marginal segments or tabs formed integral with the main body. Each tab is provided on its front face with one or more letters of the alphabet which are printed in various styles of letters and on the opposite side of each of the tabs there is provided a fragment of a picture of an object such as a cat, cow, dog, bird, or the like. The arrangement of the fragmentary pictures appearing on the backs of the segments is such that if the segments bearing the similar styled letters “C,” “O” and “W,” for example, are folded over onto the face of the main body or support, a composite picture of a cow is formed from the fragmentary pictures of the drawings.

[0009] In a preferred arrangement, the letters which are to be matched together in the spelling of one of the objects pictured on the reverse thereof are all made similar both as to the style of type and as to color. By using a different color and style of type for each word to be spelled, some of the letters of the alphabet may appear on more than one of the tabs, but if it does, it is printed in a manner distinctively different in each instance. Thus, the letters forming the word “cow” may be made in the form of rather light weight letters, whereas the letters used in spelling the word “dog” are made in the form of rather heavy letters and the letters used to designate “bird” are made in the form of script.

[0010] In still another instance indicative of the prior art, U.S. Pat. No. 3,365,198 issued Jan. 23, 1968 to Hay discloses a game and puzzle for young children to familiarize them with the alphabet and to associate various animate and inanimate objects with the letters of the alphabet. Geometrically shaped members are provided to form the various appendages of certain animated objects which can be applied to the various letters of the alphabet, and in which the starting letter of the name of the object or character depicts the object from which the starting letter is formed.

[0011] It was with knowledge of the foregoing state of the technology that the present invention has been conceived and is now reduced to practice.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0012] The present invention relates to a technique for producing a pictorial rendering of a concept using only components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language. The concept may alternatively be a concrete object or an abstract notion. The technique includes steps of displaying on a first surface the entire printed title designating the concept to be depicted in the pictorial rendering such that the printed title is comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components and applying onto a second surface distant from the first surface, a representation of each of the individual distinctly contoured components in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title. The individual distinctly contoured components variously include letters of the alphabet or other symbols, for example, but not limited to, those provided on a computer keyboard.

[0013] A primary feature, then, of the present invention is the provision of a technique for producing a pictorial rendering of a concept with components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language.

[0014] Another feature of the present invention is the provision of such a technique in which the concept to be depicted is either an abstract notion or a concrete object.

[0015] Still another feature of the present invention is the provision of such a technique which employs a kit for achieving such a desirable result.

[0016] Still a further feature of the present invention is the provision of such a technique which includes the steps of displaying on a first surface the entire printed title designating the concept to be depicted in the pictorial rendering such that the printed title is comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components and applying onto a second surface distant from the first surface, a representation of each of the individual distinctly contoured components in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title.

[0017] Yet another feature of the present invention is the provision of such a technique according to which the individual distinctly contoured components include letters or symbols of the alphabet of the vernacular language.

[0018] Yet a further feature of the present invention is the provision of such a technique which includes the further steps of providing on a third surface removable representations of each of the individual distinctly contoured components which comprise the entire printed title and selectively removing from the third surface the representation of each of the individual distinctly contoured components for application to the second surface.

[0019] Still another feature of the present invention is the provision of such a technique according to which each of the removable representations has an adhesive backing which is used to attach them to the second surface.

[0020] Still a further feature of the present invention is the provision of such a technique according to which the third surface includes an underlying support layer and an adhesively-backed overlying layer in contiguous contact with the support layer, the overlying layer being scored to outline each of the representations of the individual distinctly contoured components to enable their removal from the support layer.

[0021] Other and further features, advantages, and benefits of the invention will become apparent in the following description taken in conjunction with the following drawings. It is to be understood that the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory but are not to be restrictive of the invention. The accompanying drawings which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this invention, illustrate one of the embodiments of the invention, and together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention in general terms. Like numerals refer to like parts throughout the disclosure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0022] FIG. 1 is a plan view of a surface imprinted with pictorial renderings of concepts using only distinctly contoured components obtained from printed titles of the concepts as designated in the vernacular language;

[0023] FIG. 2 is a plan view of a surface imprinted with the printed titles from which the pictorial renderings of FIG. 1 are obtained;

[0024] FIG. 3 is a plan view of a surface imprinted with selectively removable representations of the distinctly contoured components, scored for removal and placement onto another surface in a new relatively positioned relationship such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title;

[0025] FIG. 3A is a cross section view taken generally along line 3A—3A in FIG. 3; and

[0026] FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic view in perspective of a kit incorporating parts of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0027] Turn now to the drawings and, initially, to FIGS. 1, 2, and 3 which generally illustrate the important elements of the present invention. Although the invention will be described with reference to the embodiments to be described and shown in the drawings, it should be understood that the present invention can be embodied in many alternate forms or embodiments. In addition, any suitable size, shape or type of elements or materials could be used.

[0028] In one manner of description, as depicted in FIG. 1, the invention relates to a system for producing a pictorial rendering 20, for example, of a concept (FIG. 2) using only components 22, 24, 26 obtained from a printed title 28 of the concept as designated in the vernacular language. In this instance, the printed title 28 of the concept is the English word “cup”. Indeed, throughout this disclosure, English has been chosen to be the vernacular language for ease of explanation, but the invention has application to any written language.

[0029] FIG. 2 illustrates a first surface 30 on which the entire printed title 28 designating the concept to be depicted in the pictorial rendering is displayed. The first surface 30 may be on a sheet of paper or on a sheet of vinyl, for example, or on any other suitable surface. The only requirement is that the printed title be capable of being viewed by an observer. As seen in FIG. 2, the entire printed title 28 is comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components, namely the components 22, 24, and 26 mentioned earlier. The component 22 is a uniquely and distinctively shaped letter “c”. The component 24 is a uniquely and distinctively shaped letter “u”. The component 26 is a uniquely and distinctively shaped letter “p”.

[0030] In a general sense, the individual distinctly contoured components include, variously, numbers or letters or symbols of the alphabet of the vernacular language. Typical of such symbols, but not limiting of them, are the keys of a computer keyboard.

[0031] Returning to FIG. 1, a second surface 32 is depicted distant, or distinct, from the first surface 30 onto which is applied a representation of each of the individual distinctly contoured components 22, 24, 26 in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface 30 such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in the pictorial rendering 20 of the concept designated by the printed title 28, namely a cup. More specifically, component 22 forms the major body of the cup while component 24 forms the upper rim of the cup and component 26 forms the handle of the cup and completes a side wall of the cup. As with the first surface 30, the second surface 32 may be on a sheet of paper or on a sheet of vinyl, for example, or on any other suitable surface.

[0032] Turn now to FIG. 3 for the showing of a third surface 34 on which are provided selectively removable representations 22a, 24a, 26a, respectively, of each of the individual distinctly contoured components 22, 24, 26 which comprise the entire printed title 28 for application to the second surface 32 such that the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering 20 of the concept designated by the printed title. As more clearly illustrated in FIG. 3A, the third surface 34 includes an underlying support layer 36 and an overlying layer 38 in contiguous contact with the support layer. As with the first and second surfaces, the third surface 34 may be on a sheet of paper or on a sheet of vinyl, for example, or on any other suitable surface.

[0033] The overlying layer 38 is adhesively-backed, that is, has an adhesive layer 40 intermediate itself and the underlying layer 36. Of importance, however, is the fact that the adhesive layer must be more strongly bonded to the overlying layer 38 than to the underlying layer 36. As seen both in FIGS. 3 and 3A, the overlying layer 38 may be scored, as at 42, to outline each of the representations of the individual distinctly contoured components to enable their removal from the support layer. By reason of the fact that the adhesive layer 40 is more strongly bonded to the overlying layer 38 than to the underlying layer 36, the removable representations 22a, 24a, 26a can be easily removed from the support layer 36 and reapplied to the representations 22a, 22b, 22c on the second surface 32 to produce the pictorial rendering 20. It may also be possible to provide each of the distinctly contoured components in such a manner that scoring is not necessary.

[0034] In the instance of the pictorial rendering 20, being a cup, the concept is a concrete object. However, for purposes of the invention, the concept need not be restricted to a concrete object but may be an abstract notion. Take, for instance, a pictorial rendering 44 as seen in FIG. 1. In this instance, an entire printed title 46 designating the concept to be depicted in the pictorial rendering 44 is displayed on the first surface 30 and is comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, and 60.

[0035] In FIG. 3 is illustrated, once again, the third surface 34 on which are provided selectively removable representations 48a, 50a, 52a, 54a, 56a, 58a, and 60a, respectively, of each of the individual distinctly contoured components 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, and 60 which comprise the entire printed title 46 for application to the second surface 32 such that the repositioned contoured components result in a pictorial rendering 44 of the concept designated by the printed title. In this instance, it must be explained that a person named Deborah is considered by someone to have angelic qualities and, therefore, it is proper to depict that person as an angel. As with the pictorial rendering 20, the representations 48a, 50a, 52a, 54a, 56a, 58a, and 60a of each of the individual distinctly contoured components 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, and 60 are now applied to the second surface 32 in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface 30 such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in the pictorial rendering 44 of the concept designated by the printed title 46, namely, an angel.

[0036] In another instance of a concrete object, an entire printed title 62 designating the concept to be depleted in a pictorial rendering 64 is displayed on the first surface 30 and is comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components 66, 68, 70, 72, 74. In FIG. 3 is illustrated, once again, the third surface 34 on which are provided selectively removable representations 66a, 68a, 70a, 72a, 74a, respectively, of each of the individual distinctly contoured components 66, 68, 70, 72, and 74 which comprise the entire printed title 62 for application to the second surface 32 such that the repositioned contoured components result in the pictorial rendering 64 of the concept designated by the printed title. As with the pictorial renderings 20 and 44, the representations 66a, 68a, 70a, 72a, and 74a of each of the individual distinctly contoured components 66, 68, 70, 72, and 74 are now applied to the second surface 32 in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface 30 such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in the pictorial rendering 64 of the concept designated by the printed title 62, namely, a stork.

[0037] In still another instance of a concrete object, an entire printed title 76 designating the concept to be depicted in a pictorial rendering 78 is displayed on the first surface 30 and is comprised of a plurality of individual distinctly contoured components 80, 82, 84, 86, 88, 90, 92, 94, 96, and 98. In FIG. 3 is illustrated, once again, the third surface 34 on which are provided selectively removable representations 80a, 82a, 84a, 86a, 88a, 90a, 92a, 94a, 96a, and 98a, respectively, of each of the individual distinctly contoured components 80, 82, 84, 86, 88, 90, 92, 94, 96, and 98 which comprise the entire printed title 76 for application to the second surface 32 such that the repositioned contoured components result in the pictorial rendering 78 of the concept designated by the printed title 76. As with the pictorial renderings 20, 44, and 64, the representations 80a, 82a, 84a, 86a, 88a, 90a, 92a, 94a, and 96a of each of the individual distinctly contoured components 80, 82, 84, 86, 88, 90, 92, 94, 96, and 98 are now applied to the second surface 32 in a new relatively positioned relationship different from that provided on the first surface 30 such that, taken together, the repositioned contoured components result in the pictorial rendering 78 of the concept designated by the printed title 62, namely, a helicopter.

[0038] It will be appreciated that the invention can be employed in many different venues, too many to be satisfactorily mentioned in this disclosure. However, one form of particular interest may be a kit 100 as illustrated in FIG. 4. The kit 100 may include, by way of example but not intended to be limiting of the invention, an instruction manual 102 for describing the creative process involved in producing the pictorial rendering of a concept with components obtained from a printed title of the concept as designated in the vernacular language. Another desirable item for the kit 100 would be a supply 104 of sheets having the nature of the first surface 30 illustrated in FIG. 2 providing a plurality of printed titles of objects as designated in the vernacular language. Still a further desirable item for the kit 100 would be a supply 106 of sheets having the nature of the second surface 32 for receiving the individual distinctly contoured components. For this purpose, the surface 32 may be completely blank or may have lightened outlines of the pictorial rendering to aid young or uninitiated users. Yet a further desirable item for the kit 100 would be a supply 108 of sheets having the nature of the third surface 34 on which would be provided selectively removable representations of each of the individual distinctly contoured components which comprise the entire printed title for application to the second surface such that the repositioned contoured components would result in a pictorial rendering of the concept designated by the printed title.

[0039] While preferred embodiments of the invention have been disclosed in detail, it should be understood by those skilled in the art that various other modifications may be made to the illustrated embodiments without departing from the scope of the invention as described in the specification and defined in the appended claims. For example, the invention may take the form of a company logo using the company's name, or an appealing framed drawing for display, or a game employing the technique described requiring multiple players to produce a pictorial rendering from a given title of a concept, the winner being the person who finishes first.