Title:
Golf ball marker and method therefor
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An improved golf ball marker comprises a cap having a generally hemispherical hollow, the hollow having approximately the same dimensions as one half of a standard golf ball, the cap having first and second linear slits forming a “T” shaped slit configuration for marking a golf ball inserted in the hollow with a “T” mark comprising a seam indicator line and a club alignment line. The golf ball is positioned and oriented in the hollow of the cap such that the seam is aligned with the first linear slit for making the seam indicator line on the ball with a marker and the second linear slit is perpendicular to the seam for making the club alignment line on the ball.



Inventors:
Andresen, Edward A. (Concord, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/222422
Publication Date:
08/14/2003
Filing Date:
08/15/2002
Assignee:
ANDRESEN EDWARD A.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/257, 473/268
International Classes:
A63B45/02; A63B69/36; (IPC1-7): A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LEGESSE, NINI F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BEESON SKINNER BEVERLY LLP (ONE KAISER PLAZA, SUITE 750, OAKLAND, CA, 94612, US)
Claims:

I claim:



1. A golf ball marker comprising: a cap having an inside surface bounding a generally hemispherical interior hollow, said hollow having approximately the dimensions of a half a standard golf ball, said cap further having a first linear slit, said first linear slit having a top end, and a second linear slit normal to said first linear slit, said second linear slit having a midpoint, and said second linear slit bisected by said top end of said first linear slit, said slits for marking a golf ball received in said hollow through said slits.

2. The golf ball marker of claim 1 wherein: said slits form a “T” shape.

3. The golf ball marker of claim 1 for use in association with a golf ball having a cover, the cover having two pieces joined together at an annular seam, the golf ball having an axis defining two opposite poles, the golf ball manufacturer's name imprinted on the cover at one or both of the poles, and the seam approximately coincident with a center plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the poles, wherein: said slits of said cap are for making a “T” mark on the golf ball in said hollow, and when the center plane of the golf ball is aligned with said first linear slit, said “T” mark comprising a seam indicator line made on the golf ball through said first linear slit for indicating the location of the seam of the golf ball.

4. The golf ball marker of claim 3 wherein: said “T” mark further comprises a club alignment line made on the golf ball through said second linear slit, said club alignment line is perpendicular to said seam indicator line, and said club alignment line is for providing a visual aid to which to bring into parallel alignment the face of a golf club such that, when the golf ball is struck with that golf club, the golf ball will tend to roll on the seam.

5. The golf ball marker of claim 3 wherein: said club alignment line is coincident with a vertical plane passing through the center of the golf ball.

6. The golf ball marker of claim 3 wherein: said second linear slit has a slight curvature away from said first linear slit such that said club alignment line is coincident with a vertical plane passing through but offset from the center of the golf ball.

7. The golf ball marker of claim 6 wherein: when a golf ball so marked is viewed from above, said club alignment line is offset from the center of the golf ball and appears to be a straight line.

8. The golf ball marker of claim 3 further including: said cap having two outwardly extending tabs disposed in approximate polar opposition for holding said cap.

9. The golf ball marker of claim 3 further including: said inside surface of said cap having an annular open end, said annular open end having approximately the diameter of that of a standard golf ball, said annular open end having a plurality of inwardly extending protrusions for removably holding a golf ball in said hollow.

10. The golf ball marker of claim 9 wherein: said plurality of protrusions comprises four protrusions.

11. The golf ball marker of claim 3 further including: said inside surface of said cap having an annular open end, said annular open end interrupted by at least one gap.

12. The golf ball marker of claim 11 wherein: said at least one gap is a fingertip-sized concavity.

13. The golf ball marker of claim 1 further including: means for marking a golf ball received in said hollow through said slits.

14. A golf ball marker for use in association with a golf ball having a cover, the cover having two pieces joined together at an annular seam, the golf ball having an axis defining two opposite poles, the golf club manufacturer's name imprinted on the cover at one or both of the poles, and the seam approximately coincident with a center plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the poles, the marker comprising: a cap having an inside surface bounding a generally hemispherical interior hollow, said hollow having approximately the dimensions of half a standard golf ball, said inside surface of said cap having an annular open end, said annular open end interrupted by at least one fingertip-sized concavity, said cap further having a first linear slit, said first linear slit having a top end, a second linear slit normal to said first linear slit, said second linear slit having a midpoint, and said second linear slit bisected by said top end of said first linear slit, and said slits of said cap are for making a “T” mark on the golf ball in said hollow, and when the center plane of the golf ball is aligned with said first linear slit, said “T” mark comprising a seam indicator line made on the golf ball through said first linear slit for indicating the location of the seam of the golf ball.

15. The golf ball marker of claim 14 further comprising: said annular open end having approximately the diameter of that of a standard golf ball, said annular open end having a plurality of inwardly extending protrusions for removably holding a golf ball in said hollow.

16. The golf ball marker of claim 15 further including: said cap having two outwardly extending tabs disposed in approximate polar opposition for holding said cap.

17. A golf ball marker for use in association with a golf ball having a cover, the cover having two pieces joined together at an annular seam, the golf ball having an axis defining two opposite poles, the golf club manufacturer's name imprinted on the cover at one or both of the poles, and the seam approximately coincident with a center plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the poles, the marker comprising: a cap having an inside surface bounding a generally hemispherical interior hollow, said hollow having approximately the dimensions of half a standard golf ball, said inside surface of said cap having an annular open end, said annular open end having approximately the diameter of that of a standard golf ball, said annular open end interrupted by at least one fingertip-sized concavity, said annular open end having four inwardly extending opposing protrusions for removably holding a golf ball in said hollow, said cap further having a first linear slit, said first linear slit having a top end, a second linear slit normal to said first linear slit, said second linear slit having a midpoint, and said second linear slit bisected by said top end of said first linear slit, and said cap having two outwardly extending tabs disposed in approximate polar opposition for holding said cap, and said slits of said cap are for making a “T” mark on the golf ball in said hollow, and when the center plane of the golf ball is aligned with said first linear slit, said “T” mark comprising a seam indicator line made on the golf ball through said first linear slit for indicating the location of the seam of the golf ball, and said “T” mark further comprising a club alignment line made on the golf ball through said second linear slit, said club alignment line in perpendicular disposition relative to said seam indicator line, and said club alignment line for providing a visual aid to which to bring into parallel alignment the face of a golf club such that, when the golf ball is struck with that golf club, the golf ball will tend to roll on the seam.

18. A method for marking a golf ball of the type having a cover, the cover having two pieces joined together at an annular seam, the golf ball having an axis defining two opposite poles, the golf club manufacturer's name imprinted on the cover at one or both of the poles, and the seam approximately coincident with a center plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the poles, the method comprising: inserting the golf ball substantially into a cap having an inside surface bounding a generally hemispherical interior hollow, said hollow having approximately the dimensions of half a standard golf ball, orienting the golf ball in said cap so that the center plane of the golf ball is aligned with a first linear slit in said cap, said first linear slit having a top end, pressing the golf ball, so oriented, fully into said cap, holding the golf ball in said cap, marking a seam indicator line on the golf ball through said first linear slit, said seam indicator line associated with the seam of the golf ball, marking a club alignment line on the golf ball through a second linear slit in said cap, said second linear slit normal to said first linear slit, said second linear slit further having a midpoint, and said second linear slit bisected by said top end of said first linear slit, said seam indicator line and said club alignment line forming a “T” mark on the golf ball, such that the club alignment line is normal to said seam indicator line and forms an alignment aid for positioning parallel thereto a golf club for striking the golf club such that the golf ball thereafter rolls along its seam, and removing the golf ball from the cap for playing the golf ball in a golf game.

19. The method of claim 18 wherein: removing the golf ball includes placing a finger in a finger-sized concavity in an annular open end of said inside surface of said cap, and pressing the finger against the golf ball.

20. The method of claim 18 wherein: pressing the golf ball fully into said cap further includes pressing the golf ball between a plurality of protrusions extending inwardly from an annular open end of said inside surface of said cap, and holding the golf ball in said cap includes holding the golf ball between said plurality of protrusions.

Description:

[0001] This is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 10/192489 filed Jul. 9, 2002.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention relates to golf ball markers and in particular to an apparatus and method for marking a golf ball to locate the seam of the golf ball's cover.

[0003] It is well known to mark golf balls for a variety of purposes including ball identification, stroke analysis, and club alignment. Prior art ball marking apparatuses have been numerous and varied ranging from devices for application of varying geometric markings of contrasting color affixed to the surface of a golf ball to those for markings made during actual impact of various club heads on the face of the golf ball. Representative examples of the art are briefly described below.

[0004] U.S. Pat. No. 5,713,799 to Balmat discloses a golf ball having equatorial and nonequatorial bands displayed in colors contrasting to the color of the ball. The bands provide a navigational aid to improve positioning of the golfer and club head alignment. U.S. Pat. No. 4,603,862 to Chen discloses a strip of paper having a calibrating grid for adhering to a golf ball. When the golf ball and paper are struck by a club, a mark is imparted to the paper adjacent the grid. The spot marked on the ball may be correlated with the ball flight.

[0005] U.S. Pat. No. 5,013,046 to Koch discloses a golf ball having a multitude of separate and distinct identifying marks spaced apart to that at least one mark is visible no matter how the ball comes to lie. U.S. Pat. No. 2,709,595 to de Vries provides a practice putting golf ball marked with a narrow stripe around the equator of the ball thereby forming a gauge line. If the stripe is aligned with the direction of the target hole, when the ball is struck the stripe will appear wider depending upon the deviation of the angle of the strike from the gauge line thereby acting as a practice aid.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 5,067,719 to Mook discloses a spin communicating ball marked by coloring various sections of the ball with different colors that mix and form new colors when the ball is spun. U.S. Pat. No. 4,258,921 to Worst discloses a golf ball substantially covered with dimples except for an undimpled patch formed on the outer surface for use as a smooth putter-contacting surface.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 4,086,851 to Brandell discloses a golf ball marker embodying type pieces shaped so that the ball-engaging portions of the printing characters to be impressed onto the ball conform to the curvature of the outer surface of the ball and wherein the force applied to the type pieces during marking are such that all portions of the printing characters are pressed onto the ball in a substantially normal direction to the ball surface at the points engaged. U.S. Pat. No. 6,216,587 to Foley discloses a golf ball marking device discloses a template member including a main body that forms a resiliently-deformable retention cavity for frictionally securing a golf ball inserted therein. A marking slot extending through the main body allows use of a marking device to mark a ball secured in the cavity.

[0008] U.S. Pat. No. 6,004,223 to Newcomb discloses a golf ball stencil for marking a plus (+) sign on a golf ball to assist the golfer in squaring the golf club to the intended line of ball path direction.

[0009] As with many of the prior art devices, the present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for marking golf balls for advantageous alignment with the pin and improved golf stroke accuracy. While prior art marking devices perform numerous salutary functions as described above, none provide an alignment mark on the ball which is beneficially associated with the internal structure of the ball.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0010] A golf ball marker according to the invention is directed to marking of a golf ball to indicate the location of the seam of the golf ball's cover. Golf balls are commonly constructed by encasing a core with a two-piece cover, the two pieces joined together at an annular seam midway between the two spherical “poles” of the ball. Typically, the golf ball manufacturer will print its name on the cover at one or both of the poles. If the manufacturer's name appears at both poles, the location of the seam can easily be derived as being between the poles. If the manufacturer's name appears only on one pole, the opposite pole can be quickly located, and thence the location of the seam therebetween. The present invention is directed to marking a golf ball with a “T” shaped mark to indicate the location of the seam of the cover of the golf ball and simultaneously to provide an alignment mark for accurate stroking of the ball in a direction which is, at the golfer's election, parallel or perpendicular to the seam of the ball.

[0011] The invention takes advantage of the common relation between the location or locations of the manufacturer's name on the ball and the seam of the cover. A golf ball marker therefore comprises a cap having a generally hemispherical hollow, with approximately the same dimension as that of half a standard golf ball, such that the hollow is sized to receive one half of a standard golf ball. First and second linear slits are provided in the cap, the second linear slit perpendicular to the first linear slit, and the second linear slit bisected by the top end of the first linear slit, together thereby forming a “T” shape. A golf ball is placed in the hollow of the cap and oriented so that the location of the seam, at the “equator” between the poles, is brought into alignment with the first linear slit. A marker is then used to make a “T” mark on the ball, the mark comprising a seam indicator line made through the first linear slit, which indicates the location of the seam on the golf ball, and a club alignment line, made on the golf ball through the second linear slit. The mark can be made at a plurality of locations along the location of the seam of the ball. Once the ball is removed from the cap, the location of the seam is indicated by the seam indicator line, and the club alignment line is used to align the club to strike the ball more precisely perpendicular to the seam of the ball. Especially when putting, it is desirable to stroke the ball so that it rolls as nearly as possible along its seam. Putting along the seam of the ball will maximize the chances of obtaining a truer line to the target by minimizing the wobble effect of hitting the ball at a divergent angle from the plane of the seam. The club alignment line maximizes the golfer's ability to stroke the ball so that it rolls perfectly on its seam.

[0012] A plurality of opposing protrusions are provided on an annular open end to the hollow for holding a golf ball inserted into the hollow. One or more fingertip sized concavities are provided in the annular opening to provide one or more finger holes at the ball's midsection to assist in removing it from the hollow. Preferably, two outwardly extending tabs are disposed in approximate polar opposition near the opening to the hollow which make it easier to hold the cap and a golf ball while the other hand is used to mark the ball.

[0013] Accordingly, a primary object of the invention is to provide an improved golf ball marker for marking a line on a golf ball to indicate the location of the seam of the cover of the golf ball.

[0014] Another object of the invention is to provide a golf ball marker for making a “T” mark on a golf ball, the “T” mark comprising the seam indicator line and a club alignment line perpendicular to the seam indicator line for aiding alignment of a golf club perpendicular to the seam line for striking the golf ball such that it rolls on its seam.

[0015] A further object of the invention is to provide a golf ball marker having an annular opening to a hollow dimensioned to receive a golf ball, wherein the annular opening is interrupted by at least one finger-sized concavity for providing one or more finger holes around the mid portion of a golf ball for removing it from the hollow.

[0016] A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved golf ball marker having two outwardly extending oppositely positioned tabs to assist simultaneously holding the marker and a golf ball with one hand, while the other hand is used to mark the golf ball.

[0017] Another object of the invention is to provide a golf ball marker which is highly portable, inexpensive to manufacture, and facilitates marking a golf ball to locate the seam of the cover of the golf ball and to provide an alignment mark for striking the ball so that it tends to roll on its seam.

[0018] A further object of the invention is to provide a golf ball marker that is adaptable to any manufactured golf ball for marking the golf ball to locate the seam of the cover of the golf ball.

[0019] A further object of the invention is to provide a golf ball marker for marking the location of the seam of the cover of the golf ball which is suitable for use during regulation play.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS

[0020] FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of an improved golf ball marker according to the invention, together with a typical golf ball.

[0021] FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the golf ball marker and golf ball of FIG. 1 shown with the golf ball inserted in the marker.

[0022] FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the inside of the golf ball marker of FIG. 1.

[0023] FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a golf ball having a T-shaped mark on it according to the invention.

[0024] FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a golf ball having the T-shaped mark on it, with an adjacent putter aligned with the club alignment line of the mark.

[0025] FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a golf ball having the T-shaped mark on it according to the invention with an adjacent driver aligned with the seam alignment line of the mark.

[0026] FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of a golf ball marker according to the invention.

[0027] FIG. 8 is a rotated perspective view of the golf ball marker of FIG. 7 showing a finger-tip sized concavity in the cap.

[0028] FIG. 9 is a bottom plan view of the golf ball marker of FIG. 7.

[0029] FIG. 10 is a perspective rear view of the inside of the golf ball marker of FIG. 7.

[0030] FIG. 11 is a top plan view of a golf ball having a T-shaped mark on it consistent with the embodiment shown in FIGS. 7-10.

[0031] FIG. 12 is a bottom plan view of a further embodiment of an improved golf ball marker according to the invention.

[0032] FIG. 13 is a perspective top view of the golf ball marker of FIG. 12.

[0033] FIG. 14 is a top plan view of a golf ball showing a T-shaped mark on it consistent with the embodiment of the golf ball marker shown in FIGS. 12 and 13.

[0034] FIG. 15 is a further embodiment of an improved golf ball marker according to the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENT

[0035] An improved golf ball marker is now described with reference to the illustrations.

[0036] A golf ball marker according to the invention is used with a standard golf ball G of the type shown in FIG. 1. Virtually all golf balls are constructed by encasing a core in a two-piece cover C. The two pieces of the cover C are joined together at a seam S. The joining technique is generally such that the seam is not visible from the outside. The cover is then dimpled to finish the product. Although the seam is not visible, it is widely accepted practice for the golf ball manufacturer to imprint its name at one or both of the poles P of the golf ball relative to the seam S the latter of which defines an “equator” of the ball. Accordingly, by locating the manufacturer's name at one or both of the poles P of any such golf ball, it becomes straightforward to fix the location of the seam S midway between them.

[0037] It is the experience of many golfers that if a golf ball is rolled along its seam the roll will be smoother and the ball will tend to hold its line longer. Also, since the seam is the weakest part of the cover, a higher percentage of balls split their covers if struck on the seam line. Accordingly, it is felt that the strongest portion of the golf ball is that portion of the cover farthest from the seam, and that if a golf ball is struck there the ball will be least likely to split, especially if hit with a driver. For these reasons, it is useful to have a marker to indicate the location of the seam of a golf ball.

[0038] As seen in FIGS. 1-3, a golf ball marker 10 comprises a cap 12 which has an inside surface 14 defining a hemispherical interior hollow 16. The diameter of hollow 16 is sized slightly larger than that of a standard golf ball so that approximately half a golf ball may be inserted through an annular open end 18 into the hollow 16. Preferably a plurality of extending inwardly protrusions 20 are positioned in hollow 16 at open end 18. By extending inward, protrusions 20 slightly decrease the diameter of open end 18 and grip a golf ball which has been fully inserted into hollow 16. The preferred embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 3 provides four protrusions. It is preferred to dispose pairs of protrusions 20 in diametric opposition, but the protrusions could also be arranged around open end 18 in any effective spacing which achieves gross opposition across the opening.

[0039] Referring still to FIG. 3 it is seen that open end 18 is interrupted by a fingertip-sized concavity 22. Concavity 22 leaves an exposed portion (not illustrated) of a fully inserted golf ball G uncovered by cap 12. Absent concavity 22, ball removal may be somewhat inconvenient, especially if a particular ball fits more snugly between protrusions 20, because the exposed half of the golf ball does not provide any positive finger holds allowing pressure to be brought on the ball in a direction away from the hollow. Concavity 22 facilitates ball removal from cap 12 by allowing pressure to be applied to the exposed portion in an outward direction from hollow 16.

[0040] In the preferred embodiment of the invention, cap 12 is provided with two outwardly extending tabs 26. The preferred size of cap 12 is approximately that of half a golf ball, and when a golf ball G is fully inserted into the cap, there is little to hold onto without tabs 26. This is even more of a problem when the cap 12 and ball G are held in one hand while the other hand is used to mark the ball, as will be discussed below. Tabs 26 facilitate not only holding of the ball, but manipulation of both the device and the ball during a marking operation. Preferably two tabs are provided, one on each side of cap 12. In another embodiment not illustrated, only one tab is provided. Preferably, each tab includes a hole 28 for use in attaching cap 12 to a golf bag, belt, or other accessory.

[0041] Referring generally to FIGS. 1-3, cap 12 is provided with a “T” shaped slit configuration in the cap comprising a first linear slit 40 and a second linear slit 42. First linear slit 40 has a top end 44 at which point first linear slit 40 intersects with a midpoint 46 of second linear slit 42. In the preferred embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-3, slits 40, 42 are oriented in cap 12 such that first linear slit 40 is in perpendicular relation to tabs 26 and so that second linear slit 42 is in perpendicular relation to concavity 22. In an alternate embodiment shown in FIG. 12, the orientation is rotated 90° such that the first linear slit is in linear alignment with the tabs and the second linear slit is in linear alignment with the concavities therein. The orientation of the slits in the alternate embodiment has a unique advantage discussed below.

[0042] To operate the invention, a golf ball G must initially be viewed to determine the location of the manufacturer's name and, therefrom, the location of the seam S of the ball. The cover 12 is then placed on ball G so that, when the ball is fully inserted into cap 12, first linear seam 40 is in direct physical alignment with seam S. As shown in FIG. 4, a marker is then used to mark a seam indicator line 50 on the cover C of the ball to indicate the location of the seam S. A club alignment line 52 is also marked on the cover C to provide a mark respecting which a golf club may be brought into parallel alignment. The seam indicator line 50 and club alignment line 52 together form a unique “T” shaped mark on the ball. The “T” mark has the dual advantage of clearly marking the location of the ball's seam S while simultaneously providing an alignment line with respect to which a golf club may be accurately positioned. The seam indicator line 50 also serves as a convenient sight line to the pin. Accordingly, on the course, preferably on the green in preparation for putting, the ball may be placed to indicate a selected line to the pin using the seam indicator line 50 as both a sight line and seam indicator. Bringing the club into parallel alignment with club alignment line 52 maximizes the golfer's chances of hitting the ball so that it rolls along its seam for a smoother transition along a truer line to the pin.

[0043] Referring to FIG. 5, the mark placed on the ball resulting from the preferred embodiment of the device shown in FIGS. 1-3 is such that club alignment mark 52 is, when viewed from above the ball, offset from a center point 58 of the ball. This has the unique advantage that club alignment mark 52 is brought closer to the club when viewed from above, as might a golfer preparing to make a putt. This advantage is in fact self-enforced because when the ball is placed on the ground it must to rotated until club alignment mark 52 appears from above to be a straight line. If the ball were rotated such that confluence point 60 of the mark was coincident with center point 58 of the ball, club alignment mark 52 would appear curved. Therefore, the user is motivated to correctly orient the ball such that club alignment mark 52 is closer to the club as seen in FIG. 5.

[0044] Referring to FIG. 6, if it is desired to drive the ball, as opposed to putting, application of the T mark clearly shows that parallel alignment of the driver with seam indicator line 50 will bring the club into contact with the strongest part of the ball.

[0045] Referring generally to FIGS. 7-10, an alternate embodiment of a golf ball marker according to the invention is illustrated. As with the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1-3, cap 62 is provided with a “T” shaped slit configuration comprising a first linear slit 64 and a second linear slit 66. First linear slit 64 bisects second linear slit 66 at midpoint 68 to form a “T” shaped slit configuration. When a ball is inserted into the cap, a marker (not illustrated) is used to mark seam indicator line 70 on the cover of the ball to indicate the location of seam S. See FIG. 11. A club alignment line 72 is also marked on the cover for parallel alignment therewith of a golf club. Seam indicator line 70 and club alignment line 72 together form a “T” shaped mark on the ball as seen in FIG. 10. With continuing reference to FIG. 11, the T mark on the ball has a confluence point 74 which is, when viewed from directly above the ball as would a golfer in putting position, located in the center of the ball. Thus, in this embodiment the club alignment line 72 is positioned in the center of the ball when setting up a putt.

[0046] In the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, two concavities 82a and 82b are shown on opposite sides of cap 84. The presence of two concavities aids in removing ball G from cap 84 by enabling two fingers to bring opposing pressure on the hemisphere of the ball inserted into cap 84, thereby allowing pressure to be applied to the ball in an outward direction from hollow 86. In this embodiment, first linear slit 90 is in perpendicular relation to concavities 82a and 82b and in linear alignment with tabs 92. This arrangement allows the ball G to be held between two fingers, the fingers placed on the poles P of the ball, while the other hand is used to press cap 84 over the ball without having to move the two fingers because concavities 82a and 82b are brought into the same positions as the fingers. Once the ball has been inserted and properly oriented in the cap 84, it is marked in like fashion as discussed above resulting in the unique “T” shaped mark shown in FIG. 14.

[0047] In a further embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 15, tabs 92 are located at an acute angle to concavities 94 in an ergonomic configuration resulting in less hand movement during operation of the device. Using this embodiment, cap 96 can be nestled in one hand with the thumb and little finger curved around each tab 92 thereby retaining the cap firmly in place. Once ball G is inserted into cap 96 and oriented to bring seam S into alignment with first linear slit 98, the other three fingers of the hand holding the cap instantly can be brought around the ball to retain it in place, freeing the other hand for marking the ball.

[0048] The ball may be marked using any standard marker, such as a permanent ink marker. The user may wish to mark the ball with a distinct color to identify ownership of the ball or balls marked. Alternatively, the mark may be applied using a small spray painter for a precise appearance.

[0049] There have thus been described and illustrated certain preferred embodiments of an improved golf ball marker and method therefor according to the invention. Although the present invention has been described and illustrated in detail, it is clearly understood that the same is by way of example only, the spirit and scope of the present invention being limited only by the terms of the appended claims and their legal equivalents which are intended to cover all such modifications.