Title:
Golf ball markings for 3-dimensional putting alignment
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Alignment markings on a golf ball for 3 dimensional putting alignment comprise a first, second and third dimensional alignment markings. The first dimensional alignment marking facilitates a vertical alignment of player's eyes along the centerline of golf ball vertical to ground. The second dimensional alignment marking facilitates a horizontal alignment of the ball roll direction along a ball-to-target line. The third dimensional alignment marking facilitates a horizontal alignment of putter's striking face in a direction perpendicular to the ball-to-target line. The first dimensional alignment marking consists of a circumferential in a form of a circle. The second and third dimensional alignment markings consist of diagonal markings in a form of two diagonal lines, intersecting each other at right angle at the centerline of the first dimensional alignment marking. The alignment markings can be represented by a combination of solid line, broken line, solid areas, and imprinted letters & numbers of manufacturer brands & data.



Inventors:
Yang, David (Moraga, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/059495
Publication Date:
07/31/2003
Filing Date:
01/31/2002
Assignee:
YANG DAVID
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B43/00; A63B69/36; (IPC1-7): A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LEGESSE, NINI F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAVID YANG (1020 WICKHAM DR., MORAGA, CA, 94556, US)
Claims:

What is claimed:



1. Putting alignment markings on a golf ball comprise a first, second and third dimensional alignment markings; said first dimensional alignment marking serving for a vertical alignment of a player's eyes-to-ball line along a centerline of said golf ball extending upward vertically from the center of said golf ball; said second dimensional alignment marking serving for a longitudinal alignment of a ball-roll direction along a ball-to-target line in a horizontal plan; said third dimensional alignment marking serving for a parallel alignment of a putter's striking surface along a direction perpendicular to said ball-to-target line in a horizontal plan;

2. Putting alignment markings of claim 1, herein: said first dimensional alignment marking defined as a circumferential marking in a form a circle, having an alignment method consists of positioning a centerline of said circumferential marking vertical to ground, positioning player's eyes above said golf ball near a centerline of said golf ball vertical to ground, and repositioning player's eyes until a top view of said golf ball revealing two concentric circles, one represented by said circumferential marking, and another represented by said largest circle of said golf ball; said second and third dimensional alignment markings defined as a pair of diagonal markings in a form of two diagonal lines intersecting each other at right angle at said centerline of said circumferential marking, having an alignment method consists of positioning said centerline of said circumferential marking vertical to ground, positioning one of said diagonal line in a direction along said ball-to-target line for serving said longitudinal alignment of a ball-roll direction along said ball-to-target line in a horizontal plan, and positioning another of said diagonal lines in a direction perpendicular to said ball-to-target line for serving said parallel alignment of a putter's striking surface along the direction perpendicular to said ball-to-target line in a horizontal plan.

3. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said second and third dimensional alignment markings are represented by two diagonal solid lines intersecting each other at right angle at said centerline of said first dimensional alignment marking.

4. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said second and third dimensional alignment markings are represented by two diagonal broken lines intersecting each other at right angle at said centerline of said first dimensional alignment marking.

5. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said second and third dimensional alignment markings are represented by distinguishable sold areas, creating an image of two diagonal lines intersecting each other at right angle at said centerline of said first dimensional alignment marking.

6. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said second and third dimensional alignment markings are represented by imprinted letters & numbers, creating an image of two diagonal lines intersecting each other at right angle at said centerline of said first dimensional alignment marking.

7. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said second and third dimensional alignment markings are represented by a combination of solid lines, broken lines, solid areas, and imprinted letters & numbers, creating an image of two diagonal lines intersecting each other at right angle at said centerline of said first dimensional alignment marking.

8. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said first dimensional alignment marking is represented by a solid line circle.

9. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said first dimensional alignment marking is represented by a broken line circle.

10. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said first dimensional alignment marking is represented by a solid area, creating an image of a circle.

11. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said first dimensional alignment marking is represented by imprinted letters & numbers, creating an image of a circle.

12. The golf ball alignment marking of claim 2, wherein said first dimensional alignment marking is represented by a combination of solid line, broken line, solid area, and imprinted letters & numbers, creating an image of a circle.

13. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein plural numbers of said first, second and third dimensional alignment markings are provided.

14. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, wherein said second and third dimensional alignment markings are bound within said first dimensional alignment marking.

15. The golf ball alignment markings of claim 2, Wherein said second and third dimensional alignment markings are extended beyond said first dimensional alignment marking.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] Various styles of alignment markings on a golf ball have been disclosed in the prior art for purpose of obtaining better putting alignment in the direction of ball roll (i.e., ball-to-target line) and/or the direction of putter's striking surface. These alignment markings can be found in U.S. Pat. Nos. 676,506, 1,842,944, 2,709,595, 3,420,529, 3,753,565, 4,209,172, 4,235,441, 4,258,921, 4,603,862, 5,564,707, 5,662,530, and 6,004,223.

[0002] The alignment marking on a golf ball can be useful in a golf game because of the golf rules governed by USGA According to the rules, a player is allowed to lift up and re-position a golf ball on the putting green if the ball location is properly marked prior to lifting. Therefore, a skilled player can have the opportunity to take the following steps to complete a putt. He can first take a good look at the direction of ball roll (or ball-to-target line) while standing directly behind the ball. In the mean time, he can re-position the ball so that the alignment marking on the ball can be re-aligned in the direction of ball-to-target line. Finally, the player can “square” the putter's face and make a putting stroke in the direction guided by the ball's alignment marking.

[0003] However, the alignment markings disclosed in the prior art have overlooked another important aspect of putting governed by golf rules. According to the rules, a player is required to strike the ball in a stand with both feet situated on the same side of ball (or ball-to-target line). In such a stand, player can only view the target or ball-to-target line by turning his head laterally toward the target. Therefore, it is necessary for the player to position his eyes directly above the ball in order to read the ball-to-target line correctly. Up to now, all alignment markings disclosed in the prior art can only facilitate 1-dimensional or 2-dimensional alignment in a horizontal plan. None of disclosed prior art could facilitate a third dimensional alignment for a vertical alignment of player's eyes precisely along the centerline of ball. Without obtaining such vertical alignment, player can not view the alignment markings or the ball-to-target line correctly. Consequently, the effectiveness of alignment markings of prior art is significantly impaired.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0004] The alignment markings on a golf ball of present invention consist of a circumferential marking and a pair of diagonal markings. The circumferential marking is typically in the form of a circle slightly smaller than the largest circle of the ball. The diagonal markings are typically in the form of two diagonal lines intersecting each other at right angle at the centerline of the circumferential marking.

[0005] The method of applying present invention for 3-dimensional putting alignment consist of the following steps: First, player must place the centerline of circumferential marking vertical to ground. Second, player must align one of the diagonal marking in the direction of desired ball roll (i.e. ball-to-target line), and thus the second diagonal marking perpendicular to the first diagonal marking is used for parallel alignment of putter's striking surface. Third, player can then take a side-addressing stand so that he can view and verify the top view of the circumferential marking and the equator of the ball (i.e. the largest circle of the ball). Finally, player needs to adjust his stand and eye location until the two circles appear to be concentric. These two circles will appear to be concentric only if player's eyes are positioned directly above the ball along the centerline of ball. The top view of these two circles will appear to be non-concentric if player's eyes are positioned off the centerline of ball.

[0006] The above alignment method can be better understood by illustrating the top view of the golf ball as a clock. When the player's eyes are off the centerline of ball with an offset toward 6 o'clock, the gap between the two circles at 6 o'clock position will appear to be the widest gap. Such visual effect facilitates vertical alignment of player's eyes along the centerline of ball.

[0007] It is one of the object of the present invention to provide the golf ball alignment marking to aid the vertical alignment of player's eyes along the centerline of ball vertical to ground during putting (i.e. the first dimensional alignment).

[0008] It is another object of the present invention to provide the golf ball alignment marking to aid the horizontal and longitudinal alignment of the ball roll direction along the ball-to-target line during putting (i.e. the second dimensional alignment).

[0009] It is still another object of the present invention to provide the golf ball alignment marking to aid the horizontal and parallel alignment of putter's striking face in the direction perpendicular to the ball-to-target line during putting (i.e. the third dimensional alignment).

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0010] FIG. 1 shows the top view of the first preferred embodiment of the present invention, as viewed directly above the ball.

[0011] FIG. 2 shows the top view of the first preferred embodiment of the present invention, as viewed by player's eyes off the ball-to-target line toward player's feet line.

[0012] FIG. 3 shows the top view of the first preferred embodiment of the present invention, as viewed by player's eyes off the ball-to-target line away from player's feet line.

[0013] FIG. 4 shows exemplary embodiments within the scope of present invention but having variations from the first preferred embodiment of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0014] FIG. 1 shows the top view of the first preferred embodiment of the present invention, including golf ball 1, diagonal markings 2 &3, circumferential marking 4, centerline 5 of circumferential marking 4, and equator 6 of golf ball 1. The diagonal markings 2 &3 intersect each other at right angle at the centerline 5, which is shown vertical to ground. The diagonal markings 2 &3 provide the directions of the desired ball roll (i.e. ball-to-target line) and the putter's striking surface respectively. FIG. 1 shows both circumferential marking 4 and equator 6 as concentric circles, which represent the true top view of golf ball 1 as viewed directly from the top of golf ball 1 along centerline 5. Therefore, FIG. 1 represents the top view of golf ball 1 while the golfer has obtained vertical alignment of his eyes precisely along the centerline of ball during putting.

[0015] FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 show variations of the top view of the first preferred embodiment of the present invention, in which equator 6 and circumferential marking 4 are not concentric circles. FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 represent the top views of golf ball 1 as viewed by golfer while he has not obtained proper vertical alignment of his eyes during putting. Line 7 in FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 represents the feet line of golfer while taking a side-addressing stand during putting. Therefore, line 7 must be parallel to ball-to-target line, and represents the direction of ball-to-target line. FIG. 2 shows a wider gap between equator 6 and circumferential marking 4 at the location nearest to feet line 7, which represents the top view of golf ball 1 as viewed by player with his eyes off the centerline of ball with an offset toward player's feet line 7. FIG. 3 shows a wider gap between equator 6 and circle 4 at the location far from feet line 7, which represents the top view of golf ball 1 as viewed by player with his eyes off the centerline of ball with an offset away from player's feet line 7. Such variation in gap as viewed by player becomes more significant as the offset increases, or the size of circumferential marking 4 increases.

[0016] FIG. 4 shows some exemplary embodiments having variations from the first preferred embodiment of the present invention, but are considered within the scope of present invention. Such variations include the alignment markings in various forms represented by solid lines, broken lines, solid areas, imprinted letters and numbers of manufacturer brand names and data, etc., or represented by any combination of the above forms.

[0017] Although the invention has been shown and described above, various other changes, additions and omissions in the form and detail thereof may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.