Title:
Club link
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The hosel of a club may be bent to change lie, loft and face angle of clubs made of 431; 17-4 and 15-5 stainless steel. These may be bent to a maximum of two degrees. Nickel and iron clubs may be bent to bend a maximum of four degrees. Club not bendable for lie, loft, and face angle are short based clubs; no hosel metal clubs; and any club heads made of tilatium, tri-alloy, ceomets, duralomium, graphite, wood and other materials to brittle to bend. 17-4 and 15-5 stainless are considered not bendable for most club makers because they require special bending equipment. The lie, loft and face angle of all non-bendable clubs may be changed by using the Club Link.



Inventors:
Ingram, Keith P. (Prattville, AL, US)
Application Number:
09/993763
Publication Date:
05/29/2003
Filing Date:
11/27/2001
Assignee:
INGRAM KEITH P.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B53/02; (IPC1-7): A63B53/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070099730Football teaching system and methodMay, 2007Driver
20090082124Golf swing trainer having balanced center of massMarch, 2009Hackenberg
20080207359Practice BatAugust, 2008Gibadlo
20050101404Golf club head with localized grooves and reinforcementMay, 2005Long et al.
20010007835Modular golf club system and methodJuly, 2001Baron
20090215556Inflatable game systemAugust, 2009Lander et al.
20090124409METHOD OF APPLYING A COVER TO A GOLF CLUB SHAFTMay, 2009Greeves
20100056310Apparatus With Mesh and Manducable ProtrusionMarch, 2010Silverglate et al.
20090131203Marking of Golf Balls Using Luminescent and Optically-Stimulable GlassesMay, 2009Hebert et al.
20090017930Method for measuring golf swing efficiencyJanuary, 2009Burnett et al.
20080161120Bowling Training DeviceJuly, 2008Miller et al.



Primary Examiner:
BLAU, STEPHEN LUTHER
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Keith P. INGRAM (1003 GENEVA STREET, PRATTVILLE, AL, 36066, US)
Claims:

What I claim as my invention is the golf club link which will give the golfer the opportunity to change:



1. The lie angle of a club.

2. The face angle of a club.

3. One link can change both the lie angle & face angle of a club.

Description:
[0001] Keith P. Ingram, living at 1003 Geneva Street Prattville, Ala. 36066, developed this Invention. I am a citizen of the United States of America. I was born in Fort Payne, Ala. on Nov. 21, 1921. I am the sole developer of this invention.

[0002] In the past the lie, loft, and face angles of golf club heads were changed by bending of the golf club head housel. The development of metals too hard to bend made it impossible for the club makers to continue this practice.

[0003] The Club Link is one way to change the lie angle, loft and face angle on both irons and woods without bending. Included herein are five drawings that illustrate the useage of the Club Link which is inserted between the shaft and club head to change the lie angle, loft and face angle of both irons and woods.

[0004] Drawing 1-5

[0005] Drawings one of five is a description of the golf head to golf shaft with the Club Link.

[0006] Drawing 2-5

[0007] Drawing two of five is a description of the lie angle of a golf club head.

[0008] Drawing 3-5

[0009] Drawing three of five is a description of the face angle of a golf club head.

[0010] Drawing 4-5

[0011] Drawing four of five is a description of the golf club head, golf shaft and club link made in one piece.

[0012] Drawing 5-5

[0013] Drawing five of five is a description of the loft angle of a golf club.

[0014] Lie is the angle between the centerline of the shaft and ground, when the bottom of the club is flat on the ground Face angle is the angle that the club makes with respect to the Shaft, when the wood is properly soled. Club loft is the angle between the golf shaft and clubface (drawing 5-5). When the shaft and wood club face is parallel the angle is called straight (drawing 3-5). When the toe of club is more forward than the heel the club face angle is closed in relation to the shaft (drawing 3-5). When the face angle is more forward than the toe, in relation to centerline of shaft, the angle is open or slice (drawing 3-5). The heel of a club is where the shaft is attached and the toe of the club is on the opposite end of the club head. A golf club consists of three parts: The club head, shaft and grip. The Club Link will be epoxied to both the club head and club shaft.

[0015] The golf club head, shaft, and grip may be made of any material or shape that conforms to the rules of the United States Golf Association. All parts of the club shall be fixed so that the club is one unit. The club shall not be designed to be adjustable except for weight.

[0016] The golf head to golf shaft Club Link, in the following pages, will be referred to as the Club Link. It is made of round stock, bent in the middle (drawing 1-5). The shaft link can be any length but the short link is preferable. The golf shaft can be manufactured with the degree bend at the end of the shaft, where the shaft is attached to the hosel. The Club Link will be made on one-half degree increments from one-half degree to ten degrees.

[0017] The Club Link will be made of any high strength lightweight material, so as not to affect the swing weight of the club. The Club Link may be forged or machined.

[0018] The club link may be chromed to improve the cosmetics. Ferrules and other cosmetics may be added when assembling. The Club Link is assembled to the club head and shaft by epoxy.

[0019] The hosel opening of the irons are 0.370 inches diameter and approximately one and one quarter inch deep. The hosel opening for woods is 0.335 inches in diameter, and approximately one and one quarter inch deep. The small circular end of the link is 0.335 inches in diameter for woods, and 0.370 inches in diameter for irons. When assembling this end it will epoxy to the hosel. The shaft will epoxy into the larger end of the Club Link.

[0020] In the following pages, when a statement is made about the hitting or travel of a golf ball, assume that a hitting machine is used. It has no swing faults.

[0021] When the lie of a club is correct, both heel and toe are flat on the ground or both are equal distant from the ground. When a club has both a correct lie and a straight clubface (drawing 3-5) the ball when hit will travel perpendicular to club face or straight to the target.

[0022] Assuming the face angle is correct, the effects of and incorrect lie are as follows: When the lie is upright, the heel is on the ground and the toe is off the ground, with a straight face, the ball when hit will travel to the left of the target line and the line of flight will be perpendicular to the face of the club head. When the lie is too flat, the toe of the club is on the ground and the heel is off the ground. The ball when hit will travel to the right of the target line. This is assuming the face angle is straight. The line of flight will be perpendicular to the face of the club head.

[0023] The lie of a club can be changed by assembling the club head, shaft and Club Link. The angle of the Club Link is installed parallel to the club face. The club maker will choose the correct degree angle (two, three, four, etc. degrees) to make the club have a flat lie for the golfer. In some cases decreasing or increasing the club shaft length can correct the lie angle.

[0024] Rotating shaft with the sole flat on the ground can change face angle of iron clubs. Woods have a longer sole area, unlike iron clubs the face angle cannot be changed by rotating the shaft, with the sole of club flat on the ground (drawing 3-5). A club is changed to a closed face, by assembling the shaft club head and the club link with the angle bend in the link pointing to the front of the club. Using a one-half degree club link makes a slightly closed face. To increase the angle of a closed face, a link with two, three, four and etc. Degrees must be used. A closed face club helps correct a slice. A club maker will determine the link needed by the golfer.

[0025] When the Club Link is used to change the face angle of a golf club, the loft will be changed. Changing the face angle of a club to a two-degree hook face, it will decrease the loft of club. Changing the face angle of a club to a two-degree open face, it will increase the loft.

[0026] Changing the face angle of a club is an effort to correct a flaw in the golfers swing, stance and etc. A golfer with a perfect swing, with a club with correct lie and face angle, will hit the ball perpendicular to the golf club face and straight to the target.

[0027] A club is changed to an open face by assembling the clubface, shaft and Club Link with the angle bend of the Club Link pointing to the back of the club head. A slight open face is accomplished by using a one-degree club link. To increase the open face, a Club Link with two, three, four, and etc. degrees, must be used. An open face club helps correct a draw. A club maker will determine the link needed by the golfer.

[0028] An added feature of the club link is that both lie and face angle may be changed on a club by one Club Link. For instance, a Club Link with a four degree angle, pointing to the front, at forty five degrees, shaft to face angle, will change the lie angle two degrees and a face angle of two degrees. With the angle bend pointing forty-five degrees to the back of the club, it will change the lie angle two degrees and face angle two degrees, in reference to shaft centerline, makes the club face, a two degree closed face. Closed and open faced, the face is angled slightly a few degrees off parallel to the centerline of the shaft. For closed face the toe of the club is angled slightly a few degrees toward the front of the club in relation to the centerline of the shaft. Assuming the lie is correct the effects of a closed face the ball should travel to the left for right-handed golfers. The ball will travel perpendicular to the club face. The travel of the ball will be to the right for left handed golfers.