Title:
Chair with reclinable seat
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A seat which is mounted between two side frames, each having a horizontal member and vertical leg members, wherein the seat pivots about a transverse torsion bar extending within said seat width; a structural member extending alongside the torsion bar transferring the torsion bar forces to the frames horizontal members, the structural member having travel limiting means thereon to define the pivoting limits of the seat, the torsion bar being rigidly secured at its ends to the seat and rigidly secured at a point within its ends to the structural member.



Inventors:
Markus, Isidoro Natalio (Rego Park, NY, US)
Application Number:
09/842425
Publication Date:
01/16/2003
Filing Date:
04/27/2001
Assignee:
MARKUS ISIDORO NATALIO
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47C1/02; (IPC1-7): A47C1/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20020003371Back of a chairJanuary, 2002Link
20090309404ADJUSTMENT FITTING FOR A MOTOR VEHICLE COMPONENT, AND METHOD FOR SECURING THE LOCKING EFFECT OF AN ADJUSTMENT FITTINGDecember, 2009Kirubaharan et al.
20080309134INTEGRATED BASE ASSEMBLYDecember, 2008Brandtner
20070188006Spring chairAugust, 2007Zahner III
20070170760Chair stabilizing deviceJuly, 2007Peterson
20040080193Retainer and wire rod for child seat attachmentApril, 2004Tong et al.
20080284233Vehicle seat, in particular a shell-type seatNovember, 2008Stiegler et al.
20090140560HEADREST DEVICE FOR ACTIVE HEADRESTJune, 2009Yamada
20090111354Beanie objectsApril, 2009Zheng
20090315385Securement deviceDecember, 2009Shickle
20070108755Apparatus for generating haptic signalsMay, 2007Jones



Primary Examiner:
BROWN, PETER R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Isidoro Natalio Markus (65-36 99 St (1E), Rego Park, NY, 11374-4363, US)
Claims:

What I claim is:



1. A chair having a reclinable seat comprising in combination two supporting side frames, each having at least one substantially horizontal member and substantially vertical leg members, said frames disposed in a spaced apart relationship by cross-rails; a plurality of travel limiting means placed within said side frames, and a seat mounted within said side frames for pivoting about a transverse axis defined by resilient means extending within said seat, and a structural member disposed alongside said resilient means and attached to said horizontal members; means placed onto the structural member to hold and guide said resilient means, and means for securing in a nonrotatable relation said resilient means ends to said seat, adjustable means for locking in a desired nonrotatable relation said resilient means at a point intermediate its ends to said structural member, and means positioned on said seat engaging said travel limiting means disposed within said side frames members further defining the position of maximum rearward pivoting of the seat and the position of maximum forward pivoting position of the seat, whereby said resilient means urge said seat toward its maximum forward position.

2. A chair having a reclinable seat comprising in combination two supporting side frames, each having at least one substantially horizontal member and substantially vertical leg members, said frames disposed in a spaced apart relationship by cross-rails, and a seat mounted within said side frames for pivoting about a transverse axis defined by resilient means extending within said seat, and a structural member disposed alongside said resilient means and attached to said horizontal members; means placed onto the structural member to hold and guide said resilient means; the structural member having a plurality of travel limiting means interacting with said seat thereon further defining the pivoting limits of the seat, and means for securing in a nonrotatable relation said resilient means ends to said seat; adjustable means for locking in a desired nonrotatable relation said resilient means at a point intermediate its ends to said structural member, whereby said resilient means urge said seat toward its maximum forward position.

3. A chair having a reclinable seat comprising in combination two supporting side frames each side frame having at least one substantially horizontal member and substantially vertical leg members, said frames disposed in a spaced apart relationship by cross-rails, and a seat mounted between said side frames pivoting about a transverse torsion bar extending within said seat; a structural member extending alongside the torsion bar having means for transferring the torsion bar forces to said horizontal members, and said structural member having a plurality of travel limiting means interacting with said seat thereto further defining the pivoting limits of the seat, and means for securing in a nonrotatable relation the torsion bar ends to said seat, means for securing in an adjustable nonrotatable relation the torsion bar at a point intermediate its ends to said structural member, whereby, said torsion bar supports and positions said seat.

4. In a chair as described in claim 3, whereby the means for securing in an adjustable nonrotatable relation the torsion bar to said structural member further including a pivotably anchor securely engaged to said torsion bar, and an adjustable screw engaging said structural member to a rotary joint connected thereto the anchor

5. In a chair as described in claim 1 whereby, said means positioned on said seat engaging said travel limiting means disposed within said side frame members further comprising elastic stops means disposed within said seat and seat stop brackets disposed within said side frames.

6. In a chair as described on claims 1 and 2, whereby the resilient means comprises a square cross section torsion bar.

Description:

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

[0001] Chairs of the abstract description are unknown, but reclining mechanisms seats having torsion bar(s) are common in office-type chairs. When utilizing a torsion bar in an office-type chair, the elongated axis of the bar is usually located above the chair post within a mechanism that also contains the seat rotation stops and the seat initial resiliency controls. Typical office chairs having a torsion bar mechanism are described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,136,580; 3,240,528 and 3,224,807, among others.

[0002] The only four legged chairs known to the applicant that have a torsion bar mechanism, are disclosed in the U.S. Pat. No. 4,938,532 titled “Seating apparatus”, and in the U.S. Pat. No. 5,902,912 titled “Chair with movable back”

[0003] In the chair of U.S. Pat. No. 4,938,532, the torsion bar, its bearings and the back stops are mounted on an aluminum extruded bar that is welded to the chair frame. Here the torsion bar is used to provide a flexible back support, only.

[0004] In the chair of U.S. Pat. No. 5,902,012 the ends of the torsion bar are engaged to the back board rotation limits, while the occupant load is absorbed by the fixed seat horizontal board.

[0005] Here also, the torsion bar is used to provide a flexible back support, only.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0006] This patent application is a continuation-in-part of my U.S. Pat. No. 6,168,233 B1, titled “Reclinable seating using a torsion bar”, issued Jan. 2, 2001.

[0007] The present invention relates to seating apparatus which can be in the form of a seat, a chair, sofa or other appliance which is used for seating purposes.

[0008] Here, an inner structure including the bottom seat board and the back board pivots (rotates)—as a unit—within a chair frame. Elastic torsion means allows said inner structure to rotate between established forward and rear positions in relation thereto said chair frame, making the chair more comfortable to users.

[0009] In this invention, a torsion bar is guided and supported by a series of bushings housed inside tubes; in turn the tubes are supported by a flat piece of metal that extends across the width of the chair, attaching the horizontal members of the side frames. An adjustable torsion bar anchor situated about the center of the torsion bar provides the initial resilient torque. All of above elements: the tubes, the bushings and the torsion bar, plus the anchor controls, are placed onto said piece of metal, that will further be referred as the “structural member”.

[0010] What is new is the concept of having four legged (or sled), type chairs having reclinable seating, up to now the exclusive province of office chairs having a reclining mechanism at the top of a center post. But these chairs are too expensive and/or cumbersome to move and to store-away, to be used in high density areas like restaurants, auditoriums, catering halls, etc.

[0011] In view of the shortcomings mentioned above, it is the principal object of the present invention to introduce a chair having a reclinable seat disposed in a four legged frame, or a sled frame, whereby said frame could be made of plastic, metal and/or wood.

[0012] Yet, another object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive reclinable chair having enhanced aesthetics and comfort.

[0013] A further object of the invention is to provide a simplified method of manufacturing and assembling such chairs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0014] In the accompanying drawings:

[0015] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a four legged reclinable wooden chair according to the present invention,

[0016] FIG. 2 is a schematic side elevational view of the chair shown in FIG. 1, with the seat in the fully upright position,

[0017] FIG. 3 is a schematic side elevational view of the chair shown in FIG. 1, with the seat in an fully reclined position,

[0018] FIG. 4 is an exploded partial perspective view of the seat frame of FIG. 1,

[0019] FIG. 5 is a schematic sectional view of FIG. 4 taken along line A-A,

[0020] FIG. 6 is a partial schematic sectional view of FIG. 4 taken along line B-B, with the seat frame in the fully upright position,

[0021] FIG. 7 is a partial schematic sectional view of FIG. 4 taken along line B-B, showing the seat frame in a fully reclined position,

[0022] FIG. 8 is a schematic sectional view of FIG. 4 taken along line C-C, showing the torsion bar control mechanism,

[0023] FIG. 9 is a schematic sectional view of the seat frame of FIG. 2, taken along line D-D, showing another embodiment of the invention,

[0024] FIG. 10 is a schematic sectional view of the seat frame of FIG. 3, taken along line E-E, showing another embodiment of the invention,

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0025] Referring now in detail to the embodiments of the chair shown in FIG. 1 which comprises a supporting wooden frame incorporating a pair of side frames, each side frame having a substantially horizontal member 12 and substantially vertical leg members 11. A front cross-rail 13, and a rear cross-rail 22 connect both side frames in a spaced apart relationship.

[0026] The seat comprises an upholstered bottom board 17, mounted on the seat frame 14 and an upholstered back board 16, which are connected to each other at an obtuse angle by the back support 15. The upholstery consist of contoured foam blocks that are glued onto the bottom and back boards and are subsequently covered by fabrics.

[0027] The seat frame 14 is—usually—an open structure comprising four or more wooden elements, glued and/or nailed together. The seat pivot (rotate) as a unit about a virtual axis T-T, in response to a backward leaning movement of the chair occupant, as shown in FIG. 3.

[0028] It will be understood that the hardware is symmetrically disposed on both side of the chair; hence, the hardware on one side only will be described.

[0029] FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the chair shown in FIG. 1. Here the chair frame has been vertically displaced from the seat, and for clarity purposes the bottom seat fabric, the foam 29 and the foam support board 30 are not shown.

[0030] The bottom seat board comprises a wooden frame 14, attached by the back support 15 to the upholstered back 16. 19 is the tube(s) that houses the square torsion bar 25, while 24 is a metallic insert to distribute the bar torsion moment over a larger surface of the frame, usually made of soft woods. 20 is a torsion bar rotatable anchor that adjust the initial resilience of the torsion bar, and 21 is the anchor adjusting screw.

[0031] 18 is the structural member in the shape of a bent metal plate to which the tube 19 is welded; the ends of said member—shown here protruding beyond the frame 14 side—is attached to the underneath of the horizontal members 12, by means of screws 23.

[0032] Numeral 35 is a cut out on the seat frame that is necessary for another embodiment of this invention.

[0033] FIG. 5 shows a cross section of the reclining mechanism. Here the bent structural member 18 is shown fastened to the horizontal members 12 by the fasteners 23.

[0034] The torsion bar 25 extends within the seat frame 14 and attached to it through the metallic inserts 24. The torsion bar is held in place by the four plastic bushings 32, that in turn are housed inside the tubes 19; the tubes are welded to the structural member 18.

[0035] Numeral 20 is the initial torsion bar resilience adjuster.

[0036] 30 is the foam board, a thin piece of plywood to distribute the load on the foam 29 over the structure of frame 14.

[0037] In this embodiment, any reclining of the seat is transmitted to both ends of the torsion bar 25 by ways of inserts 24 and frame members 14.

[0038] The torsion bar would had rotated freely if not for the presence of the adjustable anchor 20 that is mounted firmly on the torsion bar itself; said anchor 20 being rigidly connected to the structural member 18 by the adjusting screw 21.

[0039] Hence, any seat rotation will twist the ends of the torsion bar that are securely attached to the seat frame 14, while the center of the torsion bar remains fixed in a desired relationship with the chair side frames. The torsion bar twisting creates the reactive resilience torque that will bias the seat to its upright position.

[0040] The two extreme positions of the seat: fully upright and fully reclined are achieved by limiting the degree of rotation of the seat frame 14.

[0041] To that effect, a plurality of elastic stops mounted on the structural member 18, and placed underneath the seat frame 14, will elastically stop the seat frame rotation at pre-established positions.

[0042] In FIG. 6, 26 is a front stop, a rubber bumper attached to the structural member 18; it is placed forward of the torsion bar axis and underneath the seat frame 14, hence stopping the counter-clockwise rotation of the seat frame at its maximum upright position. Not shown: the tube 19 is solidly welded at some places to the structural member 18. The word front on the drawing indicates the position of the seat front.

[0043] In FIG. 7, the seat frame 14 is stopped by the rear stop 27, a rubber bumper that is attached to the structural member 18; here the stop prevents the seat frame 14, and hence the seat, from going farther than a pre-established maximum reclined position.

[0044] FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the mechanism for adjusting the initial resilience of the torsion bar. Here, 19 is the tube; 25 is the torsion bar that goes through a corresponding opening in the aluminum extrusion of which the anchor 20 is built, 34 is a rotary joint to accommodate the anchor's different positions in relationship with the member 18, and 21 is the adjusting screw.

[0045] By tightening up the screw 21, the torsion bar is twisted counter-clockwise, and the initial resilience increases, biasing the seat harder against the elastic front seat stops 26. Likewise, any backwards tilting of the seat by an occupant, will only increase the twisting of the bar, further increasing the seat resistance to pivot backwards.

[0046] In another embodiment of the present invention, the seat rotations are limited by the interacting of means disposed in the seat frame with means disposed in the chair side frames. In a wooden chair similar to the one shown in FIG. 2 but having this new embodiment, the seat stops would not be placed on the structural member 18, that could then be built narrower. To that effect, FIG. 9 is a schematic sectional view of the seat frame of FIG. 2, taken along line D-D, showing this new embodiment in place. Here, 12 is the side frame and 14 is the seat frame. 31 is a narrow ‘L’ shaped metal bracket rigidly attached to the side frame 12 that enters into the opening of the window 35, a cut out into the seat frame 14 (also, see numeral 35 in FIG. 4), having elastic stops 32 and 33 glued onto the lower and upper walls of the window.

[0047] With the seat at its maximum upright position—as shown in FIG. 2—the seat frame 14 is almost parallel to the side frame 12, and the bracket 31 is pressed against the upper elastic stop 33, effectively stopping any further counter clockwise rotation of the seat originated by the torsion bar bias and/or the chair occupant weight.

[0048] FIG. 10 shows a chair similar to the one shown in FIG. 3 whereby, the reclining seat is stopped at its maximum reclinable position by the bracket 31 acting against the lower elastic stop 32.





 
Previous Patent: Ten way power adjustable seat

Next Patent: Elevation chair