Title:
Recreational breakdown oar for water craft
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A breakdown oar for manually propelling a watercraft manufactured of at least two sections that may be easily joined or separated and the fastener set between the two parts. The sectional nature of the oar allows disassembly or breakdown for transportation or stowage of the oar in a space shorter than the overall length of the oar. The sections may be made of aluminum to reduce weight and provide an overall stronger oar. The reduced weight oar is easier to use following the easy assembly.



Inventors:
Hibler, Richard (Wilmington, IL, US)
Application Number:
10/035935
Publication Date:
05/16/2002
Filing Date:
10/29/2001
Assignee:
HIBLER RICHARD
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
440/101
International Classes:
B63H16/04; (IPC1-7): B63H16/04; B63H16/10
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20100028105Floating Device for Transporting and Transferring ContainersFebruary, 2010Malchow
20100022148EXHAUST DEVICE FOR OUTBOARD MOTOR MULTI-CYLINDER ENGINEJanuary, 2010Konakawa et al.
20090311923MARINE VESSEL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMDecember, 2009Levander
20100041285AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE WITH FUEL CELL AND AUTONOMOUS FLUSHING SYSTEMFebruary, 2010Riggs
20030199212Power boat propulsion systemOctober, 2003Lin
20070238371Remote steering system for outboard motorOctober, 2007Nyren
20090197489EXHAUST INTAKE BONNET (EIB) FOR MARITIME EMISSIONS CONTROL SYSTEMAugust, 2009Caro et al.
20040087224WaterpillarMay, 2004Hart
20080210149Ship Hull Comprising at Least One FloatSeptember, 2008Goubault et al.
20040161983WATERTIGHT FLYWHEEL HOUSING FOR BOATS USING A STERN DRIVE SYSTEMAugust, 2004Neisen
20080045092Amphibious Vehicle Wheel Transmission ArrangementFebruary, 2008Roycroft



Primary Examiner:
SWINEHART, EDWIN L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Jeffrey P. Calfa (954 Rice Court, Naperville, IL, 60565, US)
Claims:

I claim:



1. A breakdown oar for manually propelling a water craft that may be disassembled into at least two parts for storage or for transportation, comprising: two sections, an upper section and a lower section; said lower section having an integral wider paddle area; said sections being cylindrical in shape other than said integral wider paddle area of said lower section; a first of said sections having a male end fastener for engaging to a female end fastener on a second of said sections to engage said first and second sections for use with a water craft and allowing for disassembly of said sections into separate components; and said sections being both made at least partially of aluminum.

2. The breakdown oar of claim 1, wherein: said male end fastener is a threaded rod inserted out of said first section; said female end fastener includes a threaded bore in said second section; said oar being assembled by screwing said male end fastener into engagement with said female end fastener; and said oar being disassembled by screwing said male end fastener out of engagement with said female end fastener.

3. The breakdown oar of claim 2, wherein: said female end fastener is integral to said second section.

4. The breakdown oar of claim 3, wherein: said male end fastener is integral to said first section.

5. The breakdown oar of claim 4, wherein: an additional cylindrical section may be engaged to said upper section to lengthen said oar.

6. A breakdown oar for manually propelling a water craft that may be disassembled into at least two parts for storage or for transportation, comprising: two sections, an upper section and a lower section; said lower section having an integral wider paddle area; a first of said sections having a male end fastener for engaging to a female end fastener on a second of said sections to engage said first and second sections for use with a water craft and allowing for disassembly of said sections into separate components; and said first and second sections made of wood.

7. The breakdown oar of claim 6, wherein: said sections are cylindrical in shape.

8. The breakdown oar of claim 7, wherein: said female end fastener is a knife thread insert and said male end fastener is a headless hanger screw; and said oar being assembled by screwing said male end fastener into engagement with said female end fastener; and said oar being disassembled by screwing said male end fastener out of engagement with said female end fastener.

9. A breakdown oar for manually propelling a water craft that may be disassembled into at least two parts for storage or for transportation, comprising: two sections, an upper section and a lower section; said lower section having an integral wider paddle area; said sections being cylindrical in shape other than said integral wider paddle area of said lower section; a first of said sections having a male end fastener for engaging to a female end fastener on a second of said sections to engage said first and second sections for use with a water craft and allowing for disassembly of said sections into separate components; said oar being assembled by screwing said male end fastener into engagement with said female end fastener; said oar being disassembled by screwing said male end fastener out of engagement with said female end fastener; and said first and second sections being manufactured of a lightweight strong material.

10. The breakdown oar of claim 9, wherein: said lightweight strong material of said first and second sections is fiberglass.

11. The breakdown oar of claim 9, wherein: said lightweight strong material of said first and second sections is a plastic.

12. The breakdown oar of claim 11, wherein: said first and second sections are made by the process of injection molding.

13. The breakdown oar of claim 10, wherein: an additional cylindrical section may be engaged to said upper section to lengthen said oar.

14. The breakdown oar of claim 10, wherein: an additional cylindrical section may be engaged to said upper section to lengthen said oar.

15. The breakdown oar of claim 1, wherein: said upper section having a hollow end defined by an upper outer wall; said lower section having a hollow end defined by an lower outer wall; a bushing engaged at least partially to and within said hollow ends of said upper and lower sections; said bushings having threaded and tapped holes; one said threaded and tapped holes being said female end fastener; a threaded rod with threads engageable to said threaded and tapped holes of said bushings; said threaded rod being said male end fastener; and said threaded rod for engagement of said upper and lower sections between said two bushings.

16. The breakdown oar of claim 15, wherein: said bushings welded to said hollow ends of said upper and lower sections.

17. The breakdown oar of claim 15, wherein: said bushings braised to said hollow ends of said upper and lower sections.

Description:

[0001] This is a non-provisional patent application claiming priority of provisional patent application Serial No. 60/247,354, filed Nov. 10, 2000.

BACKGROUND

[0002] This invention relates to an oar for a recreational watercraft and the process for converting a standard oar into a breakdown oar. Oars are used to manually propel watercraft over the surface of bodies of water and have been known for a very long time. Watercrafts that are transportable have also been known for a long time. Some regulatory bodies require watercraft to carry oars. The watercraft are easily stowable and the manually propelling oars would be desirable to also be stowable. It is important that important safety equipment such as oars have strength durability and are resistant to corrosion. This invention specifically relates to a recreational breakdown oar that may be easily broken down or disassembled for easy transportation along with the watercraft.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

[0003] The invention is comprised of a recreational breakdown oar for manually propelling a watercraft manufactured of at least two sections that may be easily joined or separated and the fastener set between the two parts. The sectional nature of the oar allows disassembly or breakdown for transportation or stowage of the oar in a space shorter than the overall length of the oar. The sections may be made of aluminum to reduce weight and provide an overall stronger oar. The reduced weight oar is easier to use following the easy assembly. The embodiments made from aluminum are particularly strong and durable with the aluminum being resistant to corrosion.

DRAWINGS

[0004] Other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent upon perusal of the detailed description thereof and upon inspection of the drawings in which:

[0005] FIG. 1 is a side view of a breakdown oar made in accordance with the invention highlighting a blown up cutaway view of engagement at line A-A.

[0006] FIG. 2 is a side view of the oar of FIG. 1.

[0007] FIG. 3 is a side view of the cutaway view of engagement at line A-A of FIG. 1.

[0008] FIG. 4 is an exploded view of side view of the cutaway view of engagement of FIG. 3.

[0009] FIG. 5 is a side view of the cutaway view of engagement at line A-A of FIG. 1.

[0010] FIG. 6 is a cutaway view of the engagement of an alternative metal embodiment of an oar made in accordance with this invention.

[0011] FIG. 7 is a cutaway side view of a bushing shown in the engagement of the oar of FIG. 6.

[0012] FIG. 8 is an end on view of the bushing of FIG. 7.

[0013] FIG. 9 is a cutaway side view of a threaded rod shown in the engagement of the oar of FIG. 6.

[0014] FIG. 10 is an end on view of the rod of FIG. 9.

[0015] FIG. 11 is an end on view of one engagement end of the oar of FIG. 6.

[0016] FIG. 12 is a cutaway side view of the engagement end of FIG. 11.

DETAILS OF THE INVENTION

[0017] The invention is comprised of an oar 101 manufactured of at least two sections that may be easily joined or separated and the fastener set 119 between the two parts. The two sections are more specifically comprised of an upper section 102 and a lower section 103. There may as well be three or more sections with the additional sections being intermediate sections inter-spaced between the upper section 102 and lower section 103. The sectional nature of the oar 101 allows disassembly or breakdown for transportation or stowage of the oar 101 in a space shorter than the overall length of the oar. See FIGS. 1 and 2.

[0018] The upper section 102 and a lower section 103 of the oar 101 may be cylindrical in shape and in this case form a longer cylinder when assembled together. The lower section 103 contains a wider paddle area 106 that is integral to the cylinder, this wider paddle area designed for providing increased surface to interface with water when used. The upper section 102 and a lower section 103 of the oar 101 may be made of wood, a fiberglass, or a plastic composition. Both sections do not necessarily need to be made of the same material. The material should be strong and relatively lightweight. Either of the upper section 102 or the lower section 103 of the oar 101 may be manufactured by a plastic injection molding process. As mentioned about the upper section 102 or the lower section 103 of the oar 101 may be made from fiberglass. In another variation the upper section 102 and the lower section 103 may be made of aluminum. This will provide extra strength and be lightweight. The fact that the oar pieces are aluminum will provide enhanced strength but the oar of this invention will also allow the convenience of being easily storable when disassembled. No other oar has such capabilities.

[0019] The fastener set 119 shown in FIGS. 3 to 5 are comprised generally of a male end fastener 120 and a female end fastener 121. The male end fastener 120 is partially inserted into a bore 104 in either the upper section 102 or the lower section 103. There is an outstanding portion 123 of the male end fastener 120. The female end fastener 121 is inserted completely within a bore 105 in the opposite section of the upper and lower sections 102 and 103 of the male end fastener 120.

[0020] In the preferred embodiment, the female end fastener 121 is a knife thread insert and the male end fastener 120 is a headless hanger screw.

[0021] In one aluminum embodiment, the female end fastener 121 may be integral to either the upper section 102 or the lower section 103. It will contain a threaded hole. The male end fastener 120 may be integral to the opposite section and will include a threaded rod for insertion in the threaded hole of the female end fastener.

[0022] To use, the outstanding portion 123 of male end fastener 121 sticking out of bore 104 of one of the sections 102 or 103 is inserted into the female end fastener 120 to join the upper section 102 to the lower section 103. To store or transport the oar 101, the outstanding portion 123 is slid out of engagement with the female end fastener 120 to breakdown the oar 101 into the upper section 102 and the lower section 103.

[0023] To convert a standard oar into a breakdown oar 101, the standard oar is cut into two sections, the upper section 102 and the lower section 103. The bores 104 and 105 are drilled into the upper and lower sections 102 and 103. The female end fastener 120 and the male end fastener 121 are inserted into the respective bores 104 and 105.

[0024] In an alternate metal embodiment shown in FIGS. 6 to 12, the preferred material is aluminum due to its lightweight and strength, and low corrosion rate. The engagement is symmetric between an upper section 202 and a lower section 203. The upper section 202 has a hollow end defined by an outer wall 206 while the lower section 203 has a hollow end defined by an outer wall 205. Within each hollow end of the sections 202 and 203, there will be bushing 204. The bushings 204 have threaded and tapped holes 207. The bushings 204 welded, braised or otherwise engaged to the hollow ends of the upper and lower sections 202 and 203 respectively. The bushings 204 may be partially inserted into the hollow end of the sections 202 and 203 with a portion of one bushing 204 being visible between the sections upon assembly. There is a threaded rod 208 with threads 209 that engage the two bushings 204 and hence the upper section 202 and the lower section 203. In use the upper end 202 or the lower end 203 is engaged to the threaded rod 208. The section with the threaded rod is screwed into the bushing 204 of the opposite section.

[0025] As described above, the breakdown oars provides a number of advantages, some of which have been described above and others of that are inherent in the invention. Also modifications may be proposed to the breakdown oars without departing from the teachings herein.