Title:
Ring rolling game apparatus and method for playing the same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A lawn game apparatus that consists of three steel rings rolled one at a time along a straight course on the ground, towards three pegs positioned in a triangular pattern and staked into the ground. Points are earned by encircling one or more pegs with each steel ring, with each peg being worth one point. The game is complete when one or more players obtain eleven or more points at the conclusion of a complete round of turns.



Inventors:
Rader, Joseph Paul (San Marcos, TX, US)
Application Number:
09/887205
Publication Date:
03/21/2002
Filing Date:
06/24/2001
Assignee:
RADER JOSEPH PAUL
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B67/06; (IPC1-7): A63F3/00; A63F9/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CHIU, RALEIGH W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Joseph P. Rader (3275 Hilliard Rd., San Marcos, TX, 78666, US)
Claims:

Having described my invention, I claim:



1. A game apparatus, comprising: (a) a set of three pegs to be used as a target by being placed in a triangular fashion at the end of a playing track; (b) a set of three rings to be propelled towards the target; and, (c) a second set of three pegs to be used by an opposing player at the opposite end of the playing track.

2. A game apparatus according to claim 1 wherein the pegs are steel and pointed for the purpose of driving them into the ground.

3. A game apparatus according to claim 1 wherein the rings are steel.

4. A game apparatus according to claim 1 wherein the rings are circular.

5. A method of playing a game, comprising the steps of: (a) establishing a target of three pegs staked into the ground in a triangular configuration and, (b) propelling a set of three rings toward the target.

6. The method as claimed in claim 5, where in a score is awarded for encircling the target pegs.

7. The method as claimed in claim 5, wherein the rings are propelled toward the target by rolling them on the ground.

8. The method as claimed in claim 5, wherein the propelling of the rings is in different fashions including (a) tossing the ring under-handed; (b) spinning the ring with two hands; or, (c) placing the ring on the ground and pushing it with one or two hands

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

[0002] Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO A MICROFICHE APPENDIX

[0003] Not Applicable

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0004] This invention pertains to the field of art generally located in the class of devices relating to games and the objects and methods used in playing such games.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0005] The invention relates to a ring rolling game wherein the user manipulates a steel ring in order to roll the same ring along a ground based track towards a set of three pegs firmly embedded in the ground at the end of the track.

[0006] The game apparatus consists of pegs that are placed in the ground in varying configurations for the purpose of two or more players competing in the playing of the game. The players then sequentially roll three steel hoops along the track in an attempt to encircle one or more of the pegs. This mode of moving the apparatus along the game track is different than other lawn games that involve a ground based track. As a result, the playing of this game gives the beginning player the chance to perfect his or her technique of rolling the ring with the end result being the ability to score points and participate in the game competitively. Within a few practice rolls, the player, whether a child or adult, learns his or her rolling style and continues to play in an effort to perfect his or her rolling style.

[0007] The invention, while similar to the prior art in this area of the game of horseshoes, has advantages over the game of horseshoes. The rings are rolled, not thrown, so the risk of bystanders being struck or injured by the rings is very unlikely. Furthermore, whereas horseshoes must be tossed underhanded in order to reach the target, the rolling of the rings in this invention can be initiated in a variety of ways: methods to propel the rings include releasing the ring underhanded a few inches above the track, placing the ring in position on the track and pushing it to initiate rolling, and holding the ring between the fingers of both hands and spinning and releasing it to the ground surface to propel it along the track.

[0008] Overall, the invention provides a game that is familiar in its method of scoring, yet unique in its mode of playing.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] A lawn game that involves rolling a series of three steel rings along a straight course on the ground, towards three pegs positioned in a triangular pattern and staked into the ground. Points are earned by encircling one or more pegs with the steel ring, with each peg being worth one point. Players alternate turns where one turn consists of rolling three rings sequentially along the track toward the pegs. The game is complete when one or more players obtain eleven or more points at the conclusion of a complete round of turns. The player with the most points at the end of the winning round of turns is the winner of the game.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0010] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the playing of the game showing one possible stance of the player in rolling the rings. The figure also shows a general perspective of the track and layout of the pegs at the end of the track.

[0011] FIG. 2 shows four perspective views of scoring possibilities. These also show views of the game apparatus of both the pegs planted in the ground and the rings.

[0012] FIG. 3 provides two possible track configurations, including length requirements for properly setting up the track. Drawing a.) shows the configuration for single track and b.) shows configuration for a dual track.

[0013] FIG. 4 provides a third possible track configuration for a circular track.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0014] The apparatus or equipment of the invention consists of three identical steel rings and six identical steel pegs. FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 show the game equipment in use, with the pegs driven into the ground at the end of the track fashioned for the playing of the game.

[0015] The rings of the invention are formed from a steel bar of dimensions of a width of 1 inch, thickness of approximately {fraction (3/16)} inch and length of approximately 30 inches. These steel bars are then bent and welded to form a circle with the diameter of the formed ring being 8 and ½ inches. These rings can be formed from varying weights and types of steel and can be left bare, or finished with various colors of paint or finishes. It has been determined that varying types of steel create different styles of play.

[0016] The steel pegs are round with a pointed end and a flat head, similar to large nails. The dimensions of the pegs are ⅜ inch in diameter, 12 inches long, with a rounded, flattened head that is ⅝ inch in diameter and ⅛ inch thick. These are the same dimensions as a standard 12 inch nail.

[0017] To establish the track layout for the game, the pegs are placed in an equilateral triangle pattern using a ring to determine the setup. Each peg should be placed with the circumference of the ring, one inch from the inside edge. Pegs should be driven into the ground with four inches exposed above the ground. Course can be setup in one of the three variations as illustrated in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4.

[0018] FIG. 3 shows two layouts labeled Single Track and Dual Track. In the Single Track layout, one face of the triangle formed by the placement of the three pegs must face and be parallel to the rolling line. For this layout, three pegs are placed at one end of a 12 foot track. Two pegs should be used to set the rolling line at the opposite end of the track. These 2 pegs should be placed 4 feet apart. The target pegs should be placed in a triangle, as described in the first paragraph of this track layout portion of the detailed description, with the center of the triangle a distance of 10 feet from the rolling line.

[0019] For the Dual Track layout, three pegs are placed at both ends of a 12 foot track for a total of six pegs. Players alternate taking turns from each end of the course. The distance from the center of the 3 pegs to the center of the opposing three pegs should equal 10 feet. One face of one triangle must face and be parallel to the face of the opposing triangle.

[0020] FIG. 4 illustrates the layout of the Circular Track. Three pegs should be placed in the center of a circular area with a radius of 10 feet from the center of the triangle. The rolling circle should be marked clearly, with paint, chalk, or a trench in the dirt. Players alternate taking turns from any point outside the rolling circle.

[0021] In preparation for playing the game, the track should be set up as described previously. The playing surface should be a level area of dirt or short grass in which the pegs can be set and driven into the ground through use of a hammer or other object. Before play, the track should be cleared of debris to the satisfaction of all players.

[0022] To determine play order, each player shall take a turn at rolling all three rings towards the pegs simultaneously for what is termed the “face off”. Each peg encircled by an individual ring equals one point. For example, if one ring encircles two pegs, the second ring encircles one peg, and the third ring encircles no pegs, then the total points for the “face off” for the player who rolled the rings will equal three. At the end of the “face off” the player with the most points will win the play position of last roll. In the event of no ringed pegs, the player whose ring landed closest to the peg will win the position of last roll. After the winner is determined, the playing order of the remaining players is determined by who has the highest score, or in the event of no score, based on whose ring landed closest to the peg. The advantage in the playing of the game is to the last roller, since a complete play consists of all players completing the roll. When playing on a Dual Track as described in the Track Layout section of the detailed description, the winner of the “face off” has the choice of last roll, or of choosing which end of the track to roll from.

[0023] The game play consists of players alternating turns of rolling three rings toward the set of three pegs. At the end of rolling three rings, the player will count the number of points and pass the rings, and the turn, to the next player.

[0024] To play the game, the player rolls the steel rings along the track toward the set pegs in the mode in which he or she is most comfortable and proficient. Mode of rolling can be from a standing, sitting, or kneeling position. The ring can be rolled from any height, but the ring must be rolling on the ground no more than two feet beyond the rolling line. It is also legal play to begin the roll with the ring already on the ground. Various methods of rolling are possible and are based on the comfort of the player in rolling. Some methods to propel the rings discovered in the research and development of this game include releasing the ring underhanded a few inches above the track, placing the ring in position on the track and pushing it to initiate rolling, and holding the ring between the fingers of both hands and spinning and releasing it to the ground surface to propel it along the track.

[0025] Scoring in the playing of the game is determined by the number of pegs that are encircled by the rings. If a ring encircles 2 pegs, then 2 points are scored. If a second ring encircles the same peg, then another point is scored. The score is determined by the final lay of all three pegs at the conclusion of the players turn in the round of play. The ring must completely encircle the peg: a ring leaning against a peg or another ring, does not constitute a point. FIG. 2 shows examples of point scores based on the way the ring lays after being rolled. The figure in the upper left corner shows a “single” which is worth 1 point, the figure in the upper right corner shows a “double” which is worth 2 points, the figure in the lower left corner shows a “triple” which is worth 3 points, and the figure in the lower right corner shows a “leaner” which is worth no points.

[0026] Since the score is determined by the final lay of the rings at the end of the players turn in the round, the “leaner” in FIG. 2 could be struck by a subsequently rolled ring and moved over the peg. In this instance, the resulting ring being encircled would constitute a point. Likewise, if a ring encircles a peg and a subsequently rolled ring strikes and moves the ring away from encircling the peg, the anticipated point is lost.

[0027] Points are accumulated through out play until one player reaches 11 points with the following conditions: 1.) all players must complete the round of turns and 2.) the next closest player must be at least two points behind the winner. If these conditions are not met, play continues for all players that are within one point of the lead. After one player has reached 11 points, any player who is not within one point of the leader at the end of a round of turns, is out of the game. Those remaining in the game continue play until a complete round of turns ends with a single player at least two points ahead of the next closest player.

[0028] A “skunk” game will occur if at the end of a round of turns, a single player has at least seven points, and all other players have no points, then the player with at least seven points is the winner.

PARENT CASE TEXT

[0029] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/214,232 filed Jun. 26, 2001.