Title:
Defensive device
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
This invention relates to a defensive device, and in particular to a device designed to be carried by the police or other authorities, or by certain civilians such as security personnel. According to the invention there is provided a defensive device comprising a substantially rigid rod and a flexible strap connected to the rod, the rod being less than approximately 20 cm in length and weighing at least 150 gm, the strap having a first part and a second part, the first and second parts being permanently joined together to provide a first loop portion adapted for connection to the rod, a second loop portion adapted to receive fingers of the user, and an intermediate permanently jointed portion between first and second loop portions, the strap having an effective length, when the loop portions and intermediate portion are pulled taut, of at least 15 cm.



Inventors:
Taylor, Roy John (Staffordshire, GB)
Application Number:
09/789950
Publication Date:
09/06/2001
Filing Date:
02/21/2001
Assignee:
TAYLOR ROY JOHN
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41B15/02; (IPC1-7): A63B15/00; A63B59/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
PIERCE, WILLIAM M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Albert, Cota O. (5460 WHITE OAK AVE, ENCINO, CA, 91316, US)
Claims:
1. A defensive device comprising a substantially rigid rod and a flexible strap connected to the rod, the rod being less than approximately 20 cm in length and weighing at least 150 gm, the strap having a first part and a second part, the first and second parts being permanently joined together to provide a first loop portion adapted for connection to the rod, a second portion adapted for connection to the rod, a second loop portion adapted to receive fingers of the user, and an intermediate permanently joined portion between the first and second loop portions, the strap having an effective length, when the loop portions and intermediate portion are pulled taut, of at least 15 cm.

2. A defensive device according to claim 1 in which the rod is between 10 and 20 cm long.

3. A defensive device according to claim 2 in which the rod is between 12 and 18 cm long.

4. A defensive device according to claim 1 in which one end of the rod is tapered and rounded, said one end having a radius of curvature, the radius of curvature being in the range 0.25 to 0.5 cm.

5. A defensive device according to claim 1 in which the rod is substantially circular throughout its length.

6. A defensive device according to claim 5 in which the rod has a diameter between 1.5 and 2 cm throughout its length.

7. A defensive device according to claim 1 in which the strap has an effective length, when pulled taut, greater than the length of the rod.

8. A defensive device according to claim 7 in which the effective length of the strap, when pulled taut, is less than 30 cm.

9. A defensive device according to claim 8 in which the effective length of the strap is between 20 and 25 cm.

10. A defensive device according to claim 1 in which the weight of the rod is less than 230 gm.

11. A defensive device according to claim 10 in which the weight of the rod is between 170 gm and 220 gm.

12. A defensive device according to claim 1 in which the rod is made of one of gun metal and CZ 120 brass.

13. A defensive device according to claim 1 in which the strap is of parachute cord or parachute tape.

14. A defensive device comprising a substantially rigid rod and a flexible strap connected to the rod, the rod being less than approximately 20 cm in length the strap having a first part and a second part, the first and second parts being permanently joined together to provide a first loop portion adapted for connection to the rod, a second loop portion adapted to receive fingers of the user, and an intermediate permanently joined portion between the first and second loop portions, the strap having an effective length, when the loop portions and intermediate portion are pulled taut, of at least 15 cm.

15. A defensive device comprising a substantially rigid rod and a flexible strap connected to the rod, the rod being less than approximately 20 cm in length and weighing at least 150 gm, at least part of the strap being in the form of a loop, the strap having an effective length, when the loop is pulled taut, of at least 15 cm.

Description:

[0001] This is a continuation-in-part of patent application Ser. No. 09/312,619, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] This invention relates to a defensive device, and in particular to a device designed to be carried by the police or other authorities, or by certain civilians such as security personnel. Description of the Related Art

[0004] It is know that police officers and the like carry truncheons and/or batons in order to defined themselves against attack and also to assist them in disarming or otherwise subduing a violent attacker.

[0005] In the U.K., for example, police officers have traditionally carried a truncheon which is approximately 30 cm long, with a generally circular cross-section and having a diameter of approximately 2.5 cm adjacent the handle end, increasing to approximately 4 cm at the opposite end. The handle end carries a strap which can be wrapped around the thumb or wrist of the officer in order to reduce or prevent the likelihood of the truncheon being forcibly removed from the officer.

[0006] Recently, many police forces in the U.K. have issued their officers with so-called “long handled batons”, which comprise a rod approximately 60 cm long, with a substantially circular cross-section and having a substantially constant diameter of approximately 3 cm. Adjacent the handle end, there is a side arm which projects substantially perpendicularly from the rod. It is understood that the baton, because of its greater length and the provision of the side arm, offers the officer more protection against attack, i.e., it has greater utility in disarming or disabling an attacker.

[0007] Also, it has recently become acceptable for police officers to carry defensive sprays which can be sprayed into the face of an attacker to cause considerable discomfort and perhaps render the attacker temporarily unsighted, so that the attack is thwarted or much delayed.

[0008] However, the sight of police officers carrying such defensive weapons, in particular the long-handled baton (which cannot easily be disguised), is believed to cause alarm to many civilians, and may in certain circumstances be seen as offensive rather than defensive. In addition, it is known that truncheons or long handles batons can be awkward and cumbersome to wear, particularly if the wearer is required to sit down such as when entering a car for example.

[0009] A defensive device for use by civilians is described in the “Self Defense Manual for Men and Women—The Cobration System”, by Joseph J. Truncale Ph.D. and Ben O. Galiardi, published in 1984. The device is referred to therein as a “Pursuader”. The Pursuader device is in the form of a bar or rod usually 5½ to 6 inches long and ⅝ inch in diameter. The bar or rod is of lightweight plastic or metal and has a keyring at one end so that it can also be used as a key holder. The “Cobration System” described in this document is stated to concentrate upon the eyes, throat, ears and groin of an attacker; the device is gripped in the user's hand and thrust into the stated areas in a stabbing motion. There is no disclosure of use of the device as a clubbing weapon, and its light weight would limit its effectiveness as such a weapon.

[0010] The Pursuader device is similar to a traditional “Yawara stick” as used by Japanese martial artists for many centuries. Other devices which are derived from the Yawara stick are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 2,099,447 (Matsuyama), U.S. Pat. No. 3,106,398 (Gowdey), U.S. Pat. No. 4,655,456 (Chen Dai), U.S. Pat. No. 5,454,565 (Ramirez) and U.S. Pat. No. 5,475,367 (Paitto), GB patent application 2,226,387 (Toye & Co), Japanese patent application 4-177096 (Ashihara), and also in the publication entitled “Kubotan Keychain” edited by David & Haruko Chambers, and published by Dragon Books in 1985.

[0011] International patent publication WO90/07959 (Wilkins) discloses another derivative of a Yaware stick, and includes a strap which can be passed around a user's wrist. The purpose of the wrist strap is to reduce the likelihood of the attacker being able forcibly to remove the device from the user's grip.

[0012] GB patent 293339 (Lamb) discloses an adjustable wrist strap which may be used with a baton. The purpose of the wrist strap is to reduce the likelihood of the attacker being able forcibly to remove the baton from the user's grip.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0013] It is the object of the present invention to provide a defensive device for use by police officers and the like which is suited to disarming or disabling an attacker and yet which reduces or avoids the above disadvantages, and in particular which is substantially unobtrusive when not in use. The invention seeks to provide a device suitable for use as a Yawara stick (or thrusting weapon), or as a baton (or clubbing weapon), as desired by the user.

[0014] According to the invention therefore, there is provided a defensive device comprising a substantially rigid rod and a strap connected to the rod, the rod being less than approximately 20 cm in length.

[0015] The device can be used at close range (i.e., as a Yawara stick), with the rod being grasped and used to strike an attacker, preferably in a “thrusting” action; the device can also be used at a greater distance (i.e., as a baton), the rod being adapted for swinging movement upon the strap in a “clubbing” action.

[0016] In the latter case, the strap comprises the handle for the device.

[0017] Further advantages of such a device include: (I) that its short length allows it to be worn comfortably in a sitting position, and (ii) that it is not likely to obstruct the user while he or she is getting into or out of a vehicle such as a motor car. Following from the second of these advantages, the device is less likely to impact the side of the vehicle (and thus potentially cause damage to the vehicle) as the user is getting thereinto. Both of these advantages will be readily appreciated by those who have previously worn long-handled batons (in particular) affixed to their belt.

[0018] Preferably, the rod is between 10 and 20 cm long, usefully between 12 and 18 cm long, ideally between 14 and 16 cm long.

[0019] One end of the rod may be tapered and rounded, the radius of the rounded end being preferably in the range of 0.25 to 0.5 cm, ideally approximately 0.4 cm. Such a diameter is chosen to be particularly painful to an attacker, but unlikely to break the skin or to cause internal damage when used at close range. Such embodiments therefore have particular utility when used in a thrusting action. However, it is understood that in certain countries of the World it is not possible to sell such embodiments to members of the public such as security personnel; accordingly, while such embodiments will have utility for police forces and other authorized bodies in almost all countries of the World, non-tapering embodiments are believed to overcome the regulatory objections to sale to the public.

[0020] Preferably, the rod is substantially circular throughout its length. Preferably also the diameter of the rod is between 1.5 and 2 cm throughout its length, ideally between 1.6 and 1.8 cm (excluding the taper).

[0021] The strap, when pulled taut, is preferably between 15 cm and 30 cm in length, ideally between 20 and 25 cm in length. Desirably, the strap is longer than the rod. Usefully, the strap is a loop with a part passing through an opening in the rod; in such a case the “length” of the strap previously referred to is the effective length of the looped strap when pulled taut, i.e., approximately half the actual length of the strap when not looped.

[0022] Preferably, the rod is between 150 gm and 230 gm in weight, usefully between 170 gm and 220 gm, and ideally between 180 gm and 210 gm in weight. Such a weight has been found to be useful when swing upon the strap i.e. it is light enough to bet swing quickly and accurately and yet heavy enough to hurt an attacker sufficiently to dissuade continued attack.

[0023] Preferably, the rod is of a dense metal, suitably gun metal or an alternative such as CZ120 brass. Such a material provides the necessary weight without unwanted volume. Preferably also the strap is of “parachute cord” or “parachute tape”, and so is substantially resistant to wear, even over extended periods.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0024] FIG. 1 is a side view of a first embodiment of defensive device according to the invention.

[0025] FIG. 2 is a side view of a part of a second embodiment of the defensive device, and

[0026] FIG. 3 is a view of the preferred strap arrangement.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0027] The defensive device 10 of FIG. 1 comprises a rod 12 and a flexible strap 14. The strap 14 is a loop of cord, in this embodiment of parachute cord, and part of the loop is passed through an opening 16 in the rod. The ends of the loop are tied into a knot 18, so as to be substantially permanent.

[0028] As shown, the opening 16 in the rod has a flared end 20, to reduce the likelihood of abrasion to the strap 14.

[0029] The rod 12 is of gun metal, and in this embodiment is approximately 14.5 cm long and weighs approximately 180 gm. The rod 12 is of circular cross-section, and for the majority of its length the rod is approximately 1.8 cm in diameter. However, the rod carries several grooves 22, which serve to increase the user's grip thereon when the rod itself is being gripped. Usefully, when the rod is being gripped the strap 14 may be passed around certain fingers of the user's hand, usually the middle finger and fore finger, or the middle finger and ring finger, so as to reduce the likelihood of the device being forcibly removed from the user's grip.

[0030] The opening 16 is adjacent one end of the rod 12; its other end is tapered and rounded. In this embodiment, the taper angle α is approximately 12 degrees, though in other embodiments the taper could be between 10 and 20 degrees. The taper occurs over approximately 4.0-4.5 cm of the rod. The end 24 of the rod is rounded, having a radius of curvature of approximately 0.3-0.4 cm.

[0031] In this embodiment the strap 14 has an effective (looped) length (when pulled taut) of approximately 20 cm.

[0032] It will be understood that the defensive device 10 could be modified slightly without departing from the scope of the invention, i.e., the exact form and dimensions of the embodiment shown and described can be changed without affecting the utility of the device. In particular, while in the embodiment shown there are four grooves 22, substantially equi-spaced, in an alternative embodiment there may be two sets of two grooves, one set located near the opening 16, the other set near the start of the taper.

[0033] Notwithstanding the possibility for modification of the detailed design, however, a defensive device with the dimensions given has been found to be very effective, readily permitting the rod to be swing quickly and accurately upon the strap in a clubbing action, or gripped and used in a thrusting action.

[0034] In the embodiment of FIG. 2, the rod 30 does not have a taper, but instead has two substantially flat ends 32 and 34, the peripheral edges of which are smoothed. The rod 30 has an opening 36 adjacent end 34, which opening receives a flexible strap 38, in this embodiment of “parachute tape”, part of the tape being passed through the opening 36 and the ends of the tape (not shown) being tied in a knot similar to the knot 18. Alternatively, the ends of the strap may be stitched or sewn together rather than tied into a knot. In addition, following tying of the knot or stitching of the ends of the strap, the joint can be sealed in order to reduce the likelihood of the joint loosening.

[0035] The rod 30 is of CZ120 brass, and in this embodiment is approximately 1.45 cm long and weighs approximately 210 gm.

[0036] It will be understood that the rod 30 does not fully share the utility of the rod 10 for use in a thrusting action (through it could nevertheless be used in such an action), but does share the utility for use in a clubbing action, and also shares the desirable attribute of being storable relatively unobtrusively in a pouch adjacent the user's hip or thereabouts, where it is available for substantially immediate use. Thus, the ability of the device to be drawn from the pouch and swung at an attacker in a continuous or substantially continuous motion is a particularly desirable attribute of the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 2, and permits the device to be used to execute a defensive strike straight from the pouch in one flowing movement, which may be covert or overt, giving the user the advantage of speed and surprise while being able to maintain a non-aggressive body posture before the strike is made.

[0037] It will also be understood that while the defensive device has particular utility in disarming or disabling attackers, when not in use its short length permits it to be relatively unobtrusive, and so cause little or no alarm to civilians. Thus, the device can be stored in a pouch carried upon the belt of a police officer for example. Usefully, the pouch will be adjacent the officer's hip so that the device can quickly be grasped if desired. With the rod located substantially fully within the pouch, with only a part of the strap 14,38 projecting therefrom, the projecting part of the strap 14,38 can quickly be grasped, enabling the rod 12,30 to be rapidly pulled out of the pouch. Thus, the device can quickly be prepared for use in a clubbing action, and it may also thereafter be gripped by the hand for use in a thrusting action. When no longer in use, the defensive device can quickly be replaced in the pouch.

[0038] In alternative embodiments the ends of the strap may be stitched together by thread; this is particularly advantageous if the strap is of parachute tape. In the alternative embodiment of FIG. 3 the first part 40 and the second part 42 of the loop of the strap are joined adjacent the opening 44, suitably by stitching. Such joining has been found in practice to prevent or reduce the likelihood of the strap becoming twisted in the opening following repeated use. Clearly, in embodiment such as FIG. 3 in which the two parts 40,42 of the loop are joined, this joining should not be so extensive as to prevent the user from passing his or her fingers through the remainder of the loop when the device is to be swing in a clubbing action. In particular, as shown in FIG. 3, the stitched intermediate portion 46 lies between a first looped portion 48 (a part of which loop portion passes through the opening 44 in the rod) and a second loop portion 50 through which the user can pass one or more fingers.

[0039] As indicated above, it is desirable that the user be able to place two fingers through the loop 50, and it is expected that the most suitable swinging motion of the device can be achieved if the user's middle and fore finger, or middle and ring finger, are used. It will be understood that when the loop 50 of the strap is passed around such fingers, the user can readily swing the device in a clubbing motion, and moreover can retain good control over the device as it is swing. It will also be understood that while a single finger could be used to swing the device, the use of two fingers will reduce the likelihood that the device can be forcibly removed from the user's grip. Also, while the second loop portion 50 could be made large enough to accommodate three or four fingers, this is not expected to be greatly utilized, since the use of three or four fingers may reduce the control which the user can retain over the device as it is being swung.

[0040] In addition, while the strap is not required when the device is to be used in a thrusting motion, it may nevertheless be used to reduce the likelihood of its forced removal from the user's grip.

[0041] In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the two ends 52,54 of the strap are joined together by stitching. It is arranged that the overlapping parts of the ends 52,54 lie in the intermediate portion 46, so that the same stitching which forms the intermediate portion can also secure the ends. Alternatively of course, the ends 52,54 do not need to overlap.

[0042] It will be understood that the lateral dimension (thickness) of the strap is exaggerated in FIG. 3, for clarity.

[0043] While the invention has been described in complete detail and pictorially shown in the accompanying drawings it is not to be limited to such details, since many changes and modifications may be made to the invention without departing from the spirit and the scope thereof. Hence, it is described to cover any and all modifications and forms which may come within the language and scope of the claims.