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Title:
Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams
Kind Code:
A2
Abstract:

Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams which, whilst employing the most advanced state of the technique, introduces novel features which facilitate the automated construction of rebar reinforcements for reinforced concrete beams and the construction and placement in situ of negative reinforcements whilst offering savings on reinforcements for supporting shear stress.



Inventors:
Olatz Isabel, Merino Garay (Lealtad, 21, 39002 Santander Cantabria, ES)
Application Number:
EP20060380242
Publication Date:
04/04/2007
Filing Date:
09/07/2006
Assignee:
Megaray S. L. (Ria de Solia, 18, 39610 El Astillero, Santander Cantabria, ES)
International Classes:
E04C5/06; E04C5/02
European Classes:
E04C5/02; E04C5/06A1
View Patent Images:
Domestic Patent References:
EP1437452N/A2004-07-14
EP0785317N/A1997-07-23
EP0517107N/A1992-12-09
Foreign References:
DE2255137A11974-05-22
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Plaza Fernandez-villa, Luis C/Orense (64, 1o E, 28020 Madrid, ES)
Claims:
1. Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams, characterised by its construction method, which makes the vertical bars of the transversal reinforcement independent of the horizontal bars, facilitating the automated construction of the reinforcements through the use of sub-reinforcements, making it possible for the top and bottom, transversal and horizontal reinforcements to be of a smaller diameter than the vertical ones and separated by a larger distance, with a subsequent savings in materials.

2. Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams, characterised as per the first claim because the sub-reinforcements are made up of a top longitudinal round bar, a bottom longitudinal round bar and the vertical transversal reinforcements, which may be U-shaped, an inverted U, a C or a rectangle, described in the drawings of figure 2, 3, 4 and 5, to improve the anchorage of the vertical branches of the transversal reinforcement. These vertical transversal reinforcements protrude from the top and bottom longitudinal round bars.

3. Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams, characterised as per the first claim because the top and bottom horizontal bars of the transversal reinforcement may be of a different diameter than that of the vertical ones and be separated at different distances.

4. Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams, characterised as perthe first claim because the top and bottom horizontal bars of the transversal reinforcement may be straight, in the shape of a C or a hook, to improve joining to the top and bottom longitudinal bars.

5. Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams, characterised as per the first claim because the top horizontal bars of the transversal reinforcement are joined to the vertical transversal bars by welding or any other joining method, separated at the distance determined by the calculation. Due to the positioning of the top horizontal bars, the reinforcements that support the negative moments of the beams can be supported on them, without needing to form a broken line.

6. Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams, characterised as per the fifth claim, because the round bars that support the negative moments are placed over the top horizontal bars of the transversal reinforcement, no.17 of figure no. 6.

7. Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams, characterised as per the sixth claim, because by being able to place the round bars that support the negative moments over the horizontal bars of the transversal reinforcement, they can be manufactured joined together and placed at a single time, supported on the top horizontal bars of the transversal reinforcement instead of placing them individually.

8. Rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams, characterised as per the seventh claim because, by being able to manufacture the negative round bars joined together, the joining piece can be made in such a way as to improve anchorage.

Description:

PURPOSE OF THE INVENTION

This descriptive fact sheet refers to an application for an invention patent corresponding to rebar reinforcement for reinforced concrete beams which, whist employing the most advanced state of the technique, introduces novel features that facilitate the automated construction of rebar reinforcements for reinforced concrete beams and the construction and placement in situ of negative moments reinforcements whilst offering savings on reinforcements for supporting shear stress.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention is to be applied in the construction industry, specifically in the manufacture of rebar reinforcement both for beams and negative moment reinforcement for beams.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

As regards the current state of the technique, I refer to patent no. 9500414 and supplementary certificates nos. 9500637 and 9600182 of my invention as well as to the patent application of the author no. P200300069.

The novelty that we introduce here resides in that what in the above-mentioned patent and supplementary certificates are named sub-reinforcements, in this invention are made up of elements similar to those described in the application from the author no. P200300060, specifying, as regards the above-mentioned application, that the Us can be upright or upside down and also adding that the vertical branches of the transversal reinforcement may be in the shape of a C, end in a hook or be rectangular, all for the purpose of improving anchorage.

These transversal reinforcements are placed on a parallel plane to the longitudinal round bars to facilitate welding or joining and they protrude from the top longitudinal round bar to facilitate their construction and improve anchorage.

They also protrude from the bottom longitudinal round bars to be able to join to the transversal reinforcements the positive reinforcement round bars by welding or any other joining method, if so determined by the calculation.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The proposed reinforcement is made up of two or more sub-reinforcements which will be described in the drawings that follow, separated between them by the distance determined by the calculation and at the necessary height, as determined by the calculation for reinforced concrete structures.

The sub-reinforcements are joined together by way of two transversal round bars, a top one and a bottom one, duly separated and joined to the sub-reinforcements by welding or any other joining method, in the shape indicated in the following drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In order to complete the description provided here and for the purpose of a better comprehension of the characteristics of the invention, attached to this descriptive fact sheet, as an inseparable part of it, is a set of illustrative and non-exhaustive plans which represent the following:

  • Figure 1 - Illustrates a sectioned view of the traditional reinforcement. It is made up of the top longitudinal round bars nos. 1 and 2, the bottom longitudinal round bars nos. 3 and 4, the bottom reinforcement round bars nos. 5 and 6 and the round bars for supporting the negative moments nos. 7 and 8. The transversal reinforcement that supports the shear stress is no. 9, called stirrup. This description is generic and non-restrictive.
  • Figure 2 - Illustrates an elevation view of a sub-reinforcement made up of a top longitudinal round bar no. 1, a bottom longitudinal round bar no. 2 and a succession of Us which make up the reinforcement for supporting the shear stress, numbered 3, 3' and 3", joined to the top and bottom longitudinal round bars by welding or any other joining method.
  • Figure 3 - Illustrates an elevation view of the sub-reinforcement similar to that of figure 2, except that the Us are upright. The numbering is as provided in figure 2.
  • Figure 4 - Illustrates an elevation view of a sub-reinforcement made up of a top longitudinal round bar no. 1, a bottom longitudinal round bar no. 2 and a succession of open Cs which, in this instance, are open towards the right, but which can equally be open towards the left, making up the reinforcement for supporting the sheer stress, numbered 3, 3', 3", 3"', 3"", 3""', joined to the top and bottom longitudinal round bars by welding or any other joining method.
  • Figure 5 - Illustrates an elevation view of a sub-reinforcement made up of a top longitudinal round bar no. 1, a bottom longitudinal round bar no. 2 and a succession of rectangles numbered 3, 3' and 3", joined to the top and bottom longitudinal round bars by welding or any other joining method, making up the reinforcement for supporting the shear stress.
  • Figure 6 - Illustrates a sectioned view of the proposed reinforcement for rebar beams, in this case made up of three sub-reinforcements as those illustrated in figure 2, but which could equally be made up of those illustrated in figures 3, 4 and 5 and be made up of two, four or the number of sub-reinforcements determined by the calculation. The top longitudinal round bars are marked as nos. 10, 11 and 12 and the bottom longitudinal round bars are marked as nos. 13, 14 and 15. Numbers 16, 16' and 16" correspond to the U-shaped stirrups. Number 17 marks the top horizontal transversal reinforcement which may be as in figures 8, 9 and 10 and, in this case, for the sake of clarity, is represented in the drawing as figure 8. Number 18 corresponds to the bottom horizontal transversal reinforcement, which may be shaped as figures 11, 12 and 13, and in this case, for the sake of clarity, has been drawn as figure 11. Numbers 19 and 20 represent the bottom reinforcement round bars and numbers 21 and 22 represent the round bars that support the negative moments which, as one can see, are placed over the top transversal reinforcement no. 17, without this reinforcement needing to be in the shape of a broken line.
  • Figure no. 7 - Illustrates a longitudinal view of the reinforcement in figure 6 with the same numbering as figure 6.
  • Figure no. 8 - Illustrates a longitudinal view of the top horizontal reinforcement of transversal reinforcement no. 23.
  • Figure no. 9 - Illustrates a longitudinal view of the top horizontal reinforcement of the transversal reinforcement ending in an angle to improve anchorage no. 24.
  • Figure no. 10 - Illustrates a longitudinal view of the top horizontal einforcement of the transversal reinforcement ending in a hook shape to improve its anchorage no. 25.
  • Figure no. 11 - Illustrates a longitudinal view of the bottom horizontal reinforcement of transversal reinforcement no. 26.
  • Figure no. 12 - Illustrates a longitudinal view of the bottom horizontal reinforcement of the transversal reinforcement ending in an angle to improve anchorage no. 27.
  • Figure no. 13 - Illustrates a longitudinal view of the bottom horizontal reinforcement of the transversal reinforcement ending in a hook to improve its anchorage no. 28.
  • Figure no. 14 - Illustrates a perspective view of a negative moments reinforcement, in this case made up of three round bars nos. 29, 30 and 31, followed by two anchorages nos. 32 and 32'.
  • Figure no. 15 - Illustrates a sectioned view of the anchorage in figure 14 with the negative moments round bars nos. 29, 30, 31 and anchorage no. 32.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION

In this drawing and without posing any limitation, the sub-reinforcements of the type shown in figure 2 are manufactured in a special machine. In figure 6 we can see that the reinforcement is made up of three sub-reinforcements of the height and with the separation determined by the rules of the calculation.

They are joined together by welding or any other joining method, with the top and bottom horizontal branches of the transversal reinforcement. The top transversal reinforcement may be of the type shown in figures 8, 9 and 10. The bottom horizontal reinforcement may be of the type shown in figures 11, 12 and 13. Subsequently, the reinforcement round bars nos. 19 and 20 are introduced and the round bars for supporting the negative moments nos. 21 and 22 are placed. It is important to point out that these are supported on the top horizontal reinforcement of the transversal reinforcement, facilitating their placement in situ.

We consider it unnecessary to make this description more extensive as any expert in the field will understand the scope of the invention and the advantages that it entails.

The materials, shape, size and positioning of the elements will be subject to variation, provided that this does not alter the essence of the invention.

The terms employed in this descriptive fact sheet should be interpreted in a broad and non-restrictive manner.