Title:
Heat exchanger including furcating unit cells
United States Patent D818093


Inventors:
Erno, Daniel Jason (Clifton Park, NY, US)
Gerstler, William Dwight (Niskayuna, NY, US)
Application Number:
29/558857
Publication Date:
05/15/2018
Filing Date:
03/22/2016
Assignee:
General Electric Company (Schenectady, NY, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
D23/329
International Classes:
(IPC1-7): 2303
Field of Search:
D23/314, D23/329, D23/322, D23/323
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
20160202003HEAT EXCHANGER INCLUDING FURCATING UNIT CELLSJuly, 2016Gerstler165/165
9134072Geometry of heat exchanger with high efficiencySeptember, 2015Roisin et al.
20140251585Micro-lattice Cross-flow Heat Exchangers for AircraftSeptember, 2014Kusuda et al.
8794820Apparatus for the heat-exchanging and mixing treatment of fluid mediaAugust, 2014Mathys et al.
20140014493Minimal surface area mass and heat transfer packingJanuary, 2014Ryan
20130292103Apparatus and Method for Connecting Air Cooled Condenser Heat Exchanger Coils to Steam Distribution ManifoldNovember, 2013Eindhoven165/173
20130276469BEVERAGE COOLING AND CLEANING SYSTEMSOctober, 2013Dryzun
20130206374GEOMETRY OF HEAT EXCHANGER WITH HIGH EFFICIENCYAugust, 2013Roisin et al.
20130139541HEAT EXCHANGER FOR A MOTOR VEHICLE AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMJune, 2013Seybold et al.
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8015832Refrigerant flow divider of heat exchanger for refrigerating apparatusSeptember, 2011Setoguchi et al.
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7866377Method of using minimal surfaces and minimal skeletons to make heat exchanger componentsJanuary, 2011Slaughter
20080149299Method of using minimal surfaces and minimal skeletons to make heat exchanger componentsJune, 2008Slaughter
7069980Serpentine, multiple paths heat exchangerJuly, 2006Hofbauer
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Foreign References:
CN102721303April, 2014Three-path plate type heat exchanger
EP1777479April, 2007Apparatus for regulating the temperature of a metallic body as well as use of the same
EP1837616September, 2007A heat exchanger
GB2310896September, 1997Air cooled wall
WO/1931/092788December, 2001
WO/2011/115883September, 2011GEOMETRY OF HEAT EXCHANGER WITH HIGH EFFICIENCY
WO/2014/105113July, 2014GAS TURBINE ENGINE COMPONENT HAVING VASCULAR ENGINEERED LATTICE STRUCTURE
Other References:
Silva et al., “Constructal multi-scale tree-shaped heat exchangers”, Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 96, Issue: 3, 2004.
Kim et al., “Two-phase flow distribution of air—water annular flow in a parallel flow heat exchanger”, International Journal of Multiphase Flow, vol. 32, Issue: 12, pp. 1340-1353, Dec. 2006.
International Search Report and Written Opinion, dated Jan. 22, 2016, for International Application No. PCT/US2015/054115.
Primary Examiner:
Nelson, Chase T.
Assistant Examiner:
Aman, Ania
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Joshi, Nitin N.
Claims:
CLAIM

1. We claim the ornamental design for a heat exchanger including furcating unit cells, as shown and described.

Description:

FIG. 1 is a front view of a heat exchanger showing our new design;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the heat exchanger shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the heat exchanger shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of the heat exchanger shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the heat exchanger shown in FIG. 1 with a portion removed to show the interior; and,

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the heat exchanger shown in FIG. 1.

In these drawings, the broken lines illustrate unclaimed environmental features and form no part of the claimed design. In particular, broken lines are used in FIGS. 3-6 to illustrate the interior of the heat exchanger and form no part of the claimed design. In addition, broken lines are used in FIGS. 1 and 2 to illustrate portions of the exterior of the heat exchanger and form no part of the claimed design.