Title:
Elastic band harpoon projecting device
United States Patent 3872853


Abstract:
An underwater spring gun having a telescope holding means integrally made with a gun grip, a telescope including an objective lens at its front end and an eyepiece at its rear end and extending through and held by the gun barrel at a portion proximate to its rear end, a harpoon guiding member extending along the under face of the telescope. The propelling device for the harpoon has one end engaged in the front end portion of the telescope and the other end engaged in a rear portion of a harpoon to urge the harpoon forwardly. A discharge device for latching and releasing the rear portion of the harpoon when the harpoon is provided to hold the harpoon in its cocked position.



Inventors:
NAKATANI KIYOSHI
Application Number:
05/301298
Publication Date:
03/25/1975
Filing Date:
10/27/1972
Assignee:
SUWA TEKKO SHO CO., LTD.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
42/119, 124/37, 124/40, 124/80, D22/134, D22/138, D22/139, D22/141, D22/149
International Classes:
A01K81/00; F41B7/04; (IPC1-7): F41B7/00
Field of Search:
124/11A,22,27,26,35,40,3B,3R 33
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3667444ARCHERY BOW WITH SIGHTING MECHANISM1972-06-06Depatie
3340642Fishing spear gun with dual spear projecting means1967-09-12Vasiljevic
3102525Underwater missile and activating means therefor1963-09-03Englis
2869273Spear gun1959-01-20Thorburn
2496217Harpoon gun1950-01-31Kearny
2155391Sight for toy guns1939-04-25Arden



Primary Examiner:
Pinkham, Richard C.
Assistant Examiner:
Browne, William R.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Armstrong, Nikaido & Wegner
Claims:
What is claim is

1. An underwater gun including a telescope to be immersed in water at its front end for sighting fish in the water and a harpoon to be released from its cocked position from about the surface of water so as to capture the fish comprising a harpoon, holding means having a gun grip, a telescope including an objective lens at its front end and an eyepiece at its rear end and wherein said holding means engages and supports the telescope only at a portion proximate to its rear end, a harpoon guiding member extending along and affixed to the under face of the telescope and parallel therewith, propelling means for projecting a harpoon and having one end engaged and supported by the front end portion of the telescope and the other end engageable in a rear portion of the harpoon to urge the harpoon forward, and discharge means provided in the gun grip for latching and releasing a cocked harpoon.

2. The underwater gun as set forth in claim 1 further including a safety means provided in the rear of the discharge means to prevent the discharge means from operating and wherein the discharge means is operable only after the safety means has been operated.

3. The underwater gun as set forth in claim 1 wherein the rear end of the telescope is covered with a hood made of elastic material and formed with a bellows means which absorbs an impact produced by the counter action of the propelling means.

4. The underwater gun as set forth in claim 1 further including an auxilliary grip means for grasping by a user, said grip means being positioned in front of the gun grip and including a fishing reel having a line wound thereon, and the line being connected at one end to the rear end of the harpoon.

5. The underwater gun as set forth in claim 2 wherein the discharge means comprises a first lever disposed in the rear of a harpoon guide inlet of the gun barrel and having a front projection for latching the harpoon, an intermediate projection for returning said first lever to its initial position after it is moved and a rear projection defined by a stepped portion, the first lever being pivotally movable, a second lever pivotally disposed in the rear of the first lever and having upper and lower stepped portions in its front part for engagement with the rear projection of the first lever and upper and lower stepped portions in its rear part for engagement with a third lever, the second lever being partially exposed from an opening in the gun grip for receiving the fingers, and a spring extending between the first and second levers to urge the same toward each other, and wherein said safety means comprises the third level being pivotally mounted at an upper portion or rear wall of the gun grip behind the second lever and always urged at its front latch end into engagement with the upper stepped portion in the rear part of the second lever, the third lever having a rear end knob exposed from the gun grip.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Underwater guns generally comprise a harpoon, propelling means made of an elastic member such as a rubber member for hurling the harpoon and discharge means for locking the propelling means and discharging the harpoon upon unlocking. The user carries the underwater gun when diving, aims the gun at fish with his eye and operates the discharge means to release the propelling means therefrom, so that the fish is shot by the forwardly hurled harpoon.

Since the underwater gun heretofore known is used by the user in water by aiming the gun with the eye, sighting is inaccurate and limited and it is impossible to shoot fish at a long distance away.

Further because the operation of releasing the propelling means from the discharge means to shoot the harpoon is conducted in the water, the elastic member serving as propelling means is subject to resistance of water to attenuate the propelling force. This makes it difficult to hurl the harpoon a long distance. Furthermore the fact that the discharge means is always operated in the water produces difficulties in operating the discharge means and greater possibility and very high hazard of an inadvertent operation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of this invention is to provide an underwater gun, free of the foregoing problems and difficulties, by which fish can be sighted from above the surface of water to shoot the fish without fail.

Another object of this invention is to provide an underwater gun by which fish positioned deep in the water can be sighted accurately from above the surface of water and which is capable of hurling a harpoon deep into the water.

Another object of this invention is to provide an underwater gun which is very safe and easy to operate.

Another object of this invention is to provide an underwater gun which is capable of absorbing an impact produced upon discharge of the harpoon and drawing back a discharged harpoon.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an underwater gun which is lightweight, compact and usable while being carried around and which can also be used with ease and accuracy when mounted for example on the gunwale.

The problems described previously can be eliminated by the underwater gun of this invention which is equipped with a telescope on its gun barrel. Briefly, the underwater gun of this invention comprises a gun barrel integrally made of a gun grip, a telescope including an objective lens at its front end and an eyepiece at its rear end and extending through and held by the gun barrel at a portion proximate to its rear end, a harpoon guiding member extending along the under face of the telescope, propelling means having one end engaged in the front end portion of the telescope and the other end engageable in a rear portion of a harpoon so as to urge the harpoon forward, and discharge means adapted for engagement with and disengagement from the rear portion of the harpoon when the harpoon is in its cocked position.

Since the telescope is immersed in water at its front end, at least the objective lens portion is watertight. The rear end of the telescope is covered with a rubber hood for absorbing an impact to be produced upon discharge of the harpoon while the user is looking into water through the eyepiece at the rear end. Disposed approximately at a midportion between the objective lens and eyepiece is a condenser lens for positioning an object, namely fish, in an upright state during sighting through the telescope.

A harpoon guide inlet extending along the telescope is formed at a front upper portion of the gun barrel. The harpoon guiding member extends forward from the guide inlet along the under face of the telescope and is formed with a guide groove of a circular arc cross section. The guiding member is coextensive with a major part of the under face of the telescope to support the same. The front end of the guiding member is secured to a head member, which embraces the front end of the telescope and has a discharge opening. The discharge opening and the guide inlet are in alignment with each other in parallel with the axis of the telescope.

The discharge means housed in the gun grip includes a first lever and a second lever connected to each other by a spring and engageable with each other. A rear end portion of the harpoon, when inserted into the guide inlet, is engaged by the first lever and released therefrom by the second lever. The second lever is usually exposed from an opening formed in the gun grip for inserting the fingers.

To assure greater safety, there is provided, in addition to the first and second levers, a third lever which is spring-loaded so that the second lever is kept out of operation unless the third lever is operated. The third lever is positioned at an upper rear portion of the gun grip.

The propelling means comprises a relatively thick rodlike rubber member whose opposite ends are connected together in a loop form with a thin wire. The rubber member, caught on the head member, is stretched toward the gun grip and the wire portion is engaged in a rear end portion of the harpoon, whereby the harpoon is subjected to a forwardly urging force. The harpoon in this state is engaged by the first lever. The tip of the harpoon, thus positioned forwardly of the telescope, can be sighted through the telescope.

In front of the gun grip, there is provided an auxiliary grip which permits the user to grasp the underwater gun with both hands. Preferably, the auxiliary grip is slidable in a horizontal direction.

A fishing reel with a line wound on its spool is mounted on the auxiliary grip. The front end of the line is attached to the rear portion of the harpoon so that the harpoon can be drawn back after it has been shot upon actuation of the discharge means.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other objects, features and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description with reference to the accompanying drawings showing an embodiment of the invention for illustrative purposes only, in which:

FIg. 1 is a side elevation showing the appearance of an underwater gun of this invention in its entirety;

FIG@. 2 and 3 are side elevations showing two exemplary states of the underwater gun of this invention during use;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation partially in section showing the front half of the underwater gun of this invention, with part of the lens barrel of telescope omitted;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation in vertical section showing the rear half of the underwater gun of this invention;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged view in section taken along the line 6 -- 6 in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 7 to 10 are views illustrating the operations of discharge means and safety means in sequential order; and

FIG. 11 is a side elevation in vertical section showing a harpoon with part thereof broken away.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, there is shown an underwater gun of this invention during use as it is mounted on a gunwale above the surface of water and as it is held by the hands.

The underwater gun of this invention to be used from about the surface of water includes, as shown in FIG. 1, a telescope 1 and a gun barrel or holding means 2 through which extends a portion of the telescope 1 proximate to its rear end so as to be supported thereon. The gun barrel 2 is provided with a gun grip 3 integrally therewith. Extending along the under face of the telescope 1 is a harpoon guiding member 4 into which is slidably inserted a harpoon 5 from its rear end. The harpoon has a front end positioned forwardly of the telescope 1. The guiding member is secured to a head member embracing the front end of the telescope. Propelling means 7 comprises a rubber member having one end in engagement with the head member 6 and the other end engaged in a rear end portion of the harpoon 5 to urge the harpoon 5 forward. Discharge means 8 is releasably in engagement with the rear end of the harpoon in a cocked position and is prevented from an inadvertent operation by safety means 9. One end of a line is attached to the rear end of the harpoon 5. In front of the gun grip 3 is disposed a fishing reel 10 already known.

As shown in FIG. 5, the gun barrel 2 has a cylindrical telescope encircling portion 11, the inner wall of which is formed with circumferential ribs 12. The gun barrel 2 and gun grip 3 are formed integrally. As usually formed for receiving the fingers, the gun grip 3 is provided with an opening 13 which is defined by front and rear walls 14 and 15. The gun grip 3 is grasped with the palm of the hand placed on the rear wall 15. The gun barrel 2 is composed of a pair of segments which are fitted together over joining faces 2a (see FIG. 5) and fastened with fastening members 16 such as several bolts and nuts.

To support the telescope 1 on the gun barrel 2, a portion of the telescope proximate to its rear end extends through the encircling portion 11 as seen in FIG. 5.

The telescope 1 comprises a tubular lens barrel 17 which is circumferentially threaded in the outer face of its front end as at 18 as well as in the outer and inner faces of its rear end as indicated at 19 and 19a. It is also threaded as at 20 in its outer peripheral face, slightly forwardly of the threads 19 and 19a.

The lens barrel 17 is provided approximately at the middle of its inner portion with a condenser lens 21, which as shown in FIG. 4 is fitted in a tubular lens holder 22, with the outer peripheral edge of the convex lens 21 received in an intermediate stepped portion formed in the inner face of the holder 22. A ring 23 is driven into screw-thread engagement with threads formed in the inner face of the holder 22, causing a ring spacer 24 to retain the convex lens 21 within the holder 22 in pressing contact therewith.

To position the convex lens 21 approximately at the middle of the lens barrel 17, two tubes 25 and 25a are inserted into the lens barrel 17 from the front and rear of the barrel 17. The rear end face of the tube 25 is in contact with the front face of the holder 22 and the front face of the tube 25a is in contact with the rear face of the holder 22. The holder 22 is therefore clamped by the tubes 25 and 25a.

The rear end face of the tube 25a is held in position by a ring 26 screwed into engagement with the threads 19a formed in the inner face of rear end of the lens barrel 17 as seen in FIG. 5. The front face of the tube 25 is supported by a member for mounting an objective lens as seen in FIG. 4.

More specifically, inserted into the front end of the lens barrel 17 is a sighting tube 27 having cross hairs 27a (see FIG. 6). Further inserted into the lens barrel is a convex lens 28, followed by insertion of a spacer 29. Another convex lens 28a is then inserted, followed by a spacer 29a. Finally another convex lens 28b is inserted. Thus three convex lenses 28, 28a and 28b are housed in the lens barrel at predetermined spacing to provide an objective lens. Two stop rings 30 and 30 are screwed into engagement with the threads 18 formed externally in front end of the lens barrel 17. A watertight cap 33 having protective glass 32 and a sealing member 31 for effecting watertightness is further screwed on the threads 18, with an O-ring 30a positioned between the cap 33 and the stop ring 30, whereby the objective lens and tube 25 are secured in position. Thus the lens barrel 17 fixedly retains the objective lens and the condenser lens therein.

A portion of the lens barrel 17 proximate to its rear end is held in the encircling portion 11 of the gun barrel 2 a seen in FIG. 5. A ring 34 is screwed into engagement with the threads 20 of the lens barrel 17 to secure the lens barrel 17, namely the telescope 1, in position, with the result that the front half of the telescope extends from the gun barrel 2. Part of the rear half thereof is positioned slightly rearwardly of the gun barrel.

An eyepiece 35 is mounted in the rear end of the lens barrel 17. As shown in FIG. 5, an eyepiece holder 36 housing the eyepiece comprising two convex lenses is in engagement with threads 19 of the lens barrel 17 to position the eyepiece in place. To effect dust- and water-proofness, an O-ring 37 is clamped between a ring 38 and the front face of the holder 36 which is covered with a shock absorbing hood 39. It is noted that when the propelling means 7 is released upon actuation of the discharge means 8 as will be described later, the counteraction of the propelling means 7 will act as an impact on the user who is sighting in contact with the rear end face 39b of the hood 39. A bellows portion 39a formed in the hood 39 will then absorb the impact. Accordingly, the hood 39 may preferably be made of an elastic material such as rubber. The bellows portion 39a further assures correct sighting, because the user can view through the telescope 1 in snug-fit contact with the rear end 39b of the hood 39, free of penetration by light.

The two eyepiece lenses 35 housed in the holder 36 are retained at a specified spacing by a ring spacer 40 and fixed in position by driving a ring 42 into screwthread engagement with threads 41 formed in the inner face of the holder 36.

The head member 6 encircling the lens barrel 17 is fixed to the front end of the telescope 1 by a screw member 43 (see FIG. 4). The head member 6 comprises a tubular embracing portion 43a and an arm 43b on the embracing portion 43a formed integrally therewith. An opening 44 for discharging the harpoon is formed in the lower portion of the embracing portion 43a in parallel with the axial direction of the telescope 1. The arm 43b extends upward and forward from the upper face of the embracing portion opposite to the discharge opening 44 to provide a cavity 45 for receiving the propelling means which cavity is open at its front.

Inserted in the cavity 45 is a thick rubber member 46 serving as the propelling means 7 whose opposite ends are connected together by a wire 46a, the propelling means thus being in the form of a loop. When the wire 46a is pulled toward the gun grip 3, with the rubber member 46 inserted in the cavity 45, and is placed in a hooking notch 47 formed in the rear end of the harpoon 5, a propelling force acts on the harpoon 5 since the rubber member 46 is caught on the arm 43b.

It is seen from FIG. 4 that the head member 6 is provided with a member for releasably retaining the propelling means. More specifically, in order to make the front opening of the cavity 45 closable, a retainer plate 49 for the rubber member is pivotally mounted on a pin 48 at the front end of the arm 43b. The rear face of the retainer plate 49 is defined by an arcuate face 49a having its center at the pin 48. The arcuate face 49a is formed at its opposite ends with projections 49b and 49c. While the projection 49b is on the upper face of the arm 43b as seen in FIG. 4, the portion including the projection 49b closes the opening of the cavity 45. In order to positively maintain this state, the arcuate face 49a is formed with a concave cutout 49d for engagement with a projecting member 51 loaded with a spring 50 in the arm 43b. In this way, the rubber member 46 is prevented from being removed under the counteraction when it contracts upon discharge of the harpoon 5.

To replace the rubber member 46, the front of the retainer plate 49 is pushed in the direction of the arrow against the elastic force of the spring 50, whereby the plate 49 is pivotally moved about the pin 48 to open the cavity 45. The range of pivotal movement of the plate 49 is limited by the contact of the projection 49c with the under face of the arm 43b.

Disposed between the head member 6 and the gun barrel 2 is the harpoon guiding member 4 extending along the under face of the telescope 1. As shown in FIG. 6, the guiding member 4 has a face 52 for receiving the under face of the lens barrel 17 and an arcuate groove 52a for guiding the harpoon 5. The base end of the guiding member is secured to the front under portion of the gun grip 2 (see FIG. 5), and the front end thereof is secured to the under face of the embracing portion 43a of the head member 6, namely to the discharge opening 44 (see FIG. 4).

As shown in FIG. 5, a harpoon guide inlet 53 extends horizontally through the front under portion of the gun barrel 2. The guide inlet 53, guide groove 52a and discharge opening 44 are aligned under the telescope 1 substantially in parallel to its axis and are in communication.

The harpoon 5 slidably inserted into the discharge opening 44, guide groove 52a and guide inlet 53 is shaped in the form of an arrow as shown in FIG. 11. A tubular member 54 made of plastic reinforced with fiber is fitted at its tail endwith a projection 55a to which is secured a metal nock 55. The nock 55 is formed with several notches 47 for hooking the rubber member and a notch 47a for a first lever of the discharge means 8 to engage in.

A projection 56a is fitted in the head of the tubular member 54 to secure a harpoon holder 56 having a pointed metal harpoon tip 5a screwed therein. The harpoon tip 5a has a projection 57 pivoted thereto. The nock 55 has a ring 58 for connecting one end of the line wound on the spool of reel.

When the harpoon 5 is inserted into the discharge opening 44, then into guide groove 52a and guide inlet 53 and the rubber member 46 is stretched, with the wire 46a engaged in the hooking notch 47, a force for urging the harpoon forward is accumulated since the rubber member is caught on the arm 43b. The harpoon thus subjected to the urging force is locked by the first lever of the discharge means 8. Accordingly, when released from the lever, the harpoon will be forced out forward.

The means for discharging the harpoon 5 is shown in FIG. 5. The discharge means 8 comprises a first lever 60 disposed in the gun grip 3 in alignment with the guide inlet 53 and pivotally mounted on a pin 49 and a second lever disposed behind the first lever 60 and pivotally mounted on a pin 61, the first and second levers being connected together by a spring 63 thereby urged toward each other. The second lever 62, exposed from the opening 13 for receiving the fingers, serves as a trigger.

The first lever 60 is formed in its upper front portion with a latch portion 60a for engagement in the notch 47a of the harpoon 5. Formed to the rear of the latch portion 60a is an upper projection 60b for returning the first lever 60. A stepped portion behind the projection 60b is a rear projection 60c for engagment with the second lever 62.

The second lever 62 is formed in its front with two stepped portions 62a and 62b for engagement with the rear projection 60c, the lower stepped portion 62b being defined by a deeper notch than the upper stepped portion 62a. Before the harpoon 5 is discharged, the projection 60c of the first lever 60 is in engagement with the lower stepped portion 62b.

To assure greater safety, a third lever 64 is provided in addition to the second lever 62, the second and third levers 62 and 64 being in the following relationship. As shown in FIG. 5, the second lever 62 is formed in its rear face with upper and lower stepped portions 62c and 62d for engagement with the front end of the third lever 64, the lower stepped portion 62d being defined by a deeper notch than the upper stepped portion 62c.

The rear wall 15 of the gun grip 3 is formed in its upper portion with a chamber 65 horizontally extending therethrough. The third lever 64 is pivotally supported at its intermediate portion on a pin 66 within the chamber 65 in vertically movable manner. A latch portion 64a at the front end of the third lever 64 extending to the rear face of the second lever 62 is urged upward all the time under the action of a spring 67. An operating portion at the rear end of the third lever 64 is provided with a knob 64b exposed from an upper portion of rear wall 15 of the gun grip 3.

Before the harpoon 5 is dicharged, the latch portion 64a of the third lever 64 in engagement with the upper stepped portion 62c of the second lever 62 urges the second lever 64 in a counterclockwise movement in FIG. 5 about the pin 61, causing the first lever 60 to pivotally move also in a counterclockwise direction through the spring 63. (The elastic force of the spring 67 is greater than that of the spring 63.) However, the projection 60c of the first lever 60 in engagement with the lower stepped portion 62b of the second lever 62 and the latch projection 60a of the first lever in engagement with notch 47a of the harpoon 5 prevent the pivotal movement. Thus the discharge means 8 is provided which incorporates the safety means 9 (see FIG. 1) such that the second lever 62 is kept out of operation insofar as the third lever 64 retains the second lever 62 in engagement therewith, in other words, unless the third lever 64 is operated.

Since the knob 64b of the third lever 64 is exposed from the rear wall 15 of the gun grip 3, the possibility for the user to inadvertently touch the third lever 64 is very little, if any. Moreover because the lever 64 is usually kept depressed by the spring 67, slight contact therewith will not permit the third lever 64 to release the second lever 62. Thus the safety means is simple in construction and highly reliable.

To discharge the harpoon 5, the knob 64b of the third lever 64 is pushed up against spring 67 as shown in FIG. 7. Since the hand of the user is grasping the rear wall 15 of the gun grip 3, with the back of the hand in a position accessible to the knob 64b at this time, the knob 64b can be pushed up with the back of the hand.

The lifting of the knob 64b brings the latch portion 64a of the third lever 64 to the stepped portion 62d of the second lever 62, making the second lever 62 ready for operation. The second lever 62 is then pulled by the finger toward the direction of arrow in FIG. 8 against the action of the spring 63 by which the second lever 62 is urged toward the first lever 60.

Since the first lever 60 and second lever 62 are connected by the spring 63, the first lever 60 follows the movement of the second lever 62 to move in a counterclockwise direction in the drawing. Simultaneously with the disengagement of the projection 60c from the stepped portion 62b, the latch portion 60a unlatches the notch 47a of the harpoon 5, whereupon the harpoon 5 is forced out forward by the propelling means 7. FIG. 8 shows, in dot-and-dash lines, the positions of the parts just before the discharge of the harpoon.

As shown in FIG. 9, the discharge of the harpoon 5 brings the rear projection 60b of the first lever 60 into engagement with the upper stepped portion 62a of the second lever 62, with the latch portion 64a of the third lever 64 in engagement with the stepped portion 62d of the second lever 62.

The discharged harpoon 5 is subsequently brought back by winding up the line into the reel 10 (not shown in FIG. 9) to guide the nock 55 into the inlet 53 in sliding fashion, with the result that the end of the nock 55 pushes the upper projection 60b of the first lever 60 (see FIG. 9), causing the first lever 60 to pivotally move in a clockwise direction about the pin 59. The first lever 60 connected through the spring 63 to the second lever 62 therefore initiates the second lever 62 into a clockwise movement. Further pushing force applied by the nock 55 on the projection 60b causes the projection 60c of the first lever 60 to move progressively away from the upper stepped portion 62a as shown in FIG. 10, while progressively bringing the latch portion 60a of the first lever 60 into engagement with the notch 47a in the nock 55. At the same time, the latch portion 64a of the third lever 64 moves along the upper face of the lower stepped portion 62d. When the nock 55 is further pushed forcefully, the discharge means 8 latches the harpoon 5 in cocked position and the safety means 9 in set state as illustrated in FIG. 7.

As shown in FIG. 2, the underwater gun of this invention is mounted on a gunwale 68 or the like for use. For this purpose, a detachable holder 69 for holding the lens barrel 17 is mounted on the telescope 1 slightly rearwardly of its head member 6. A connecting arm 70 is secured to the holder 69 and the base end of the arm 70 is connected by a known ball joint 72 to a metal member 71 detachably secured to the gunwale 68. Thus, the gun can be oriented in any desired direction for use with part of telescope 1 immersed in the water.

Alternatively, the gun may be supported directly by the user during use as shown in FIG. 3.

To make the gun easier to grasp, the underwater gun according to this invention is provided, in addition to the gun grip 3, with an auxiliary grip 73, which is further utilized to mount the reel 10 for returning the harpoon by rewinding.

It is seen from FIGS. 4 and 5 that the gun grip 3 is formed in its bottom face with an elongated groove 74 extending in a horizontal direction. Two nuts 75 are embedded in the bottom of the gun grip in alignment with the groove 74. A mounting member 73a secured to the auxiliary rubber grip 73 is fitted in the groove and fastened thereto with screws 76 and 76, whereby an opening 77 for inserting fingers is formed which is defined by the front wall 14 of the gun grip 3 and auxiliary grip 73. In order to enlarge or reduce the opening 77, screw bores 78 and 78 in the mounting member 73a are elongated longitudinally of the gun.

The base portion of an eye ring 79 is fixedly embedded in the top face 73b of the auxiliary grip 73. The reel 10 is secured to an intermediate portion of the eye ring 79 by means of a known fastening member 80 such as is usually employed for detachably securing a reel to a fishing rod. Thus the reel 10 is fixedly positioned in front of the auxiliary grip 73.

As already known, the reel 10 has a spool 10a on which is wound a line 10b. The line 10b is passed through the eye ring 79 and connected to a connecting ring 58 on the nock 55 of the harpoon 5. The line 5 pulls back the harpoon 5 after it has been forced out by the discharge means 8.

The harpoon 5 cocked in engagement with the first lever 60 of the discharge means 8 is positioned forwardly of the telescope 1 as illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 3, so that when seen through the eyepiece of the telescope 1, the harpoon tip 5a may serve as a substitute for the graticule. When accuracy is essential, however, the cross hairs 27a are used for sighting. The intersection of the cross hairs 27a is positioned substantially in registry with the tip 5a of the harpoon 5.

To make is sure that the harpoon 5 forced out from the discharge opening 44 will be thrown deep into the water in accurate direction, the center of gravity of the harpoon 5 may preferably be positioned toward the front of the harpoon longitudinally thereof. Because the front end of the telescope is immersed in the water but the rubber member serving as propelling means 7 is positioned in the air, the propelling force of the rubber member is free of resistance of water, permitting the harpoon 5 to be thrown a long distance.

The fact that the telescope mounted on the gun barrel is immersed in the water at its front end during use results in the advantages that the telescope is free of refraction at the surface of the water and that fish deep in the water can be magnified for sighting. If the telescope 1 is equipped at its head portion 6 with a spotlight (not shown), fish can be gathered immediately below the underwater gun when it is used at nighttime.

While a basic embodiment of this invention has been described and illustrated, various alterations and modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art. Accordingly, the invention is not limited to the detailed disclosure given above but includes any desired changes and modifications within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claim.