Title:
SANDWICH PANEL STRUCTURES FOR SUPPORTING SHELVES
United States Patent 3844231
Abstract:
Panel structures for supporting relatively heavily loaded, removable and adjustable shelving embodying first and second substantially planar skins and a core structure between the skins, one or both skins having a plurality of perforations arranged in a plurality of vertical columns for receiving studs or hooks of the shelf structure, the core structure including a plurality of vertical, elongated strips or slabs fixedly joined substantially continuously to respective rear faces of the skins with the edges thereof disposed between respective columns of perforations, and free spaces in the core behind the perforations.


Inventors:
PEACOCK H
Application Number:
05/281173
Publication Date:
10/29/1974
Filing Date:
08/16/1972
Assignee:
Myers Industrial, Inc. (Decatur, IL)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
108/152, 248/220.41
International Classes:
A47B57/42; A47B96/20; E04C2/34; (IPC1-7): A47B9/00
Field of Search:
108/108-112 52
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3664906STRUCTURAL PANEL OF RIBBED STRUCTURES OF THERMOPLASTIC RESIN1972-05-23Hartig
3538668REINFORCED ARCHITECTURAL SHAPES1970-11-10Anderson
3485382SHELF SUPPORT1969-12-23Larson
3482706PANELLING ARRANGEMENT FOR SUPPORTING SHELVES AND OTHER FITMENTS1969-12-09Stewart
3452959COMBINATIONAL PLASTIC HANGER-BOARD CONSTRUCTION1969-07-01Ishikawa
3413765Expandable wall panel and method for making same1968-12-03Williams et al.
3235218Article-display board1966-02-15Graham
3229239Support structure for supporting articles on perforated sheet material1966-01-11Modrey
3209709Shelving1965-10-05Shoffner
3191777Flexible, perforated display or storage panels1965-06-29Willits
3067536Advertising display device1962-12-11Brittans
2942364Display device1960-06-28Horton
2843970Toy for forming caricatures or the like1958-07-22Keuls
2725604Door1955-12-06Loetscher
2626711Adjustable peg rack1953-01-27Saul et al.
2054694Building construction1936-09-15Eldredge
1521922Tile1925-01-06Wilson et al.
Primary Examiner:
Gilliam, Paul R.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Johnston, Keil, Thompson & Shurtleff
Parent Case Data:


RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Ser. No. 143,409, filed May 14, 1971, now abandoned.
Claims:
The invention is hereby claimed as follows

1. A panel and shelving structure adapted to support relatively heavily loaded removable and adjustable shelving units which comprises a first, substantially planar skin, a second, substantially planar skin, a core structure between said skins, said first skin having a plurality of perforations therein arranged in a plurality of vertical columns of said perforations for receiving studs or hooks projecting rearwardly from the rear portion of a shlf structure, said core structure having a plurality of vertical, parallel, straight, elongated strips respectively extending from the top to the bottom of said panel structure and adhesively bonded substantially continuously along opposite side edges thereof to respective rear faces of said skins, said opposite edges having a depth of at least 1/8 inch, the respective strips being disposed contiguous to the respective side edges of said perforations in respective columns, the spacing between the respective edges of said strips or slabs and the respective side edges of said perforations is zero to about 1/2 inch, said core having free spaces behind said perforations to permit insertion of hooks or studs of said shelving units, and at least one shelf mounted on said first skin and supported thereon by shelf mounting means embodying hooked members extending through respective perforations in said first skin with leg portions of said hooked members lying against the inner face of said first skin adjacent the respective perforations, whereby the joinder of the two skins by the vertical strips with substantially continuous joinder of the respective edges to the skins and close spacing between the skin-bonded strips and side edges of the perforations provides an integrated structure wherein the opposite skin and the contiguous strips coact to eliminate essentially bowing in the shelf-supporting skin due to torque forces which occur under heavy loading of shelves cantilivered from the shelf-supporting skin by said shelf mounting means with the hooked members extending into said perforations and hooked behind said last-mentioned skin.

2. A panel structure as climed in claim 1 wherein said core structure comprises vertical wood strips having opposite side edges of at least 1/8 inch depth, said opposite side edges being adhesively secured to said skins.

3. A panel structure as claimed in claim 1 wherein said core structure comprises vertical hardboard strips having opposite side edges of at least 1/8 inch depth, said opposite side edges being adhesively secured to said skins.

4. A panel structure as claimed in claim 1, wherein said strips are made of particle board having a thickness of at least 3/16 inch.

Description:
INTRODUCTION

The subject invention concerns new concepts in perforated panel structures for supporting relatively heavily loaded, removable and adjustable shelving. It particularly pertains to panel structures and shelving used in the display of merchandise in retail outlets and the like.

One of the problems heretofore confronting the art is that of providing a removable and adjustable shelving-support structure having sufficient structural strength to support thereon relatively heavily loaded shelving. The support of removable shelving on perforated panels themselves has been a serious problem because of the bowing tendency of the perforated panels, e.g., pegboard, under the torque load of a loaded shelf. Removable shelving with brackets received in the holes of pegboard have been heretofore known, but these shelves can only be lightly loaded before they begin to tip downwardly as a result of bowing of the pegboard.

With shelving display units made to support relatively heavy display loads, the art has proceeded in the direction of using slotted, vertical, metal channels or the like at horizontally spaced intervals for receiving the hooks or like members of shelf support structure. These channels carry the entire load of the shelf and may be interposed between spacefilling panels as is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,040,905. Alternatively they may be located inside a panel structure embodying a core and outer skins as is disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,482,706, 3,265,217, 3,352,428 and 3,315,818.

THE INVENTION HEREIN

Briefly, the subject invention concerns new concepts in panel structures whereby heavily loaded, removable and adjustable shelving may be supported by the perforations in the skin of a panel structure embodying two relatively thin skins and a core structure therebetween. Bowing of the shelf-supporting skin under torque load of the loaded shelving is prevented by tying together the shelf-supporting skin and the second opposite skin via the core structure in a manner whereby the second skin coacts with the first shelf-supporting skin to prevent its bowing under torque load of a heavily loaded shelf. This is attained by using, as the core structure, elongated vertical strips or slabs fixedly joined substantially continually along opposite faces to the respective rear faces of the skins, e.g., by adhesives, with the edges of the respective strips or slabs being disposed contiguous to the respective side edges of the perforations, which are in turn disposed in the perforated skin in horizontally spaced, vertical columns.

The skins may be pressed fiberboard, pressed woodchip board, wood, metal or synthetic polymer sheeting having adequate tear strength and deformation strength for the shelf loading involved. The spacing between the respective edges of the strips or slabs and the respective side edges of the perforations in their respective columns is in the order of zero up to about 1/2 inch. The perforations preferably are substantially rectangular or circular and have a width dimension or diameter in the order of abut 1/8 inch to 1 inch, preferably 1/4 inch to 3/4 inch.

The panel structures of the invention may be used on display gondolas or may be used per se as divider panels. In both cases, both skins preferably are perforated in substantially identical fashion to allow either side of the panel structure to be used for display purposes. However, such panel structures may also be hung on building walls or the like, in which case the rear skin need not be perforated.

The materials used for the core structure may be wood strips, hardboard strips, chipboard or particle board strips, metal channels or I-beams having opposite flat faces adapted for the adhesive securing thereof to the inner faces of the skins, slabs of a cellular synthetic polymer, slabs of chipboard or particle board strips of a synthetic polymer or slabs of honeycomb paper. The strips have a minimm depth of the edges or faces adhered to the panels of about 1/8 inch. The maximum depth is not critical, but usually will not exceed about 1 inch. Where slabs are used, they may have a width equal to or slightly less than the spacing between vertical columns of perforations or they may have a greater width. In the latter case, the slabs will extend across one or more vertical columns of the perforations, at which point the slabs are preferably provided with a vertical groove aligned with the respective columns over which the slab extends. These grooves, or the spacings between slabs or strips on opposite sides of a vertical column of perforations, provide free spaces behind the perforations to permit ready insertion of hooks or studs of the removable and adjustable shelving units.

The shelf-supporting skin or skins may be ribbed, e.g., corrugated material sheeting, to improve the strength of the substantially planar skin against bowing under shelf loading. The front face of the ribs and the rear face of the portions therebetween, e.g., oppositely extending ribs, preferably are substantially planar at the apexial portions in order to provide planar surfaces in which the perforations are located and also planar rear surfaces for adhesively securing the rear face of the skin to the core structure.

The shelf structure itself includes a shelf and shelfsupporting means, e.g., a shelf bracket removably or fixedly attached to the underside of the shelf and at least one hook member extending through a perforation and hooked behind the skin adjacent said perforation. In the illustrated embodiments, the hook structure has a width slightly less than the width of the perforations and a flat horizontal leg adapted to rest continually on the lower edge of the perforation. The hook members may comprise two downwardly hooked members extending through respective perforations in one of the columns or may include only one upwardly hooked member plus a lower stud extending through respective perforations in the column.

In a form more fully described in my joint application with Paul Durham and Merle Baker, the shelves may have metal channels along their rear edges. These channels have a plurality of hook structures adapted to extend through respective perforations and hook behind the panel skins. With hooks at about 1/2 inch to 2 inch spacings, preferably at about 1 inch spacings, the shelves can be supported without underlying brackets for light loadings, or may also utilize underlying support brackets.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Preferred embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a gondola structure having mounted thereon a first embodiment of a panel structure of the invention, wherein the core structure comprises vertical wood strips;

FIG. 2 is a vertical section through the panel structure of said embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a front, enlarged, fragmentary elevation of said embodiment as viewed from plane 3--3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a horizontal section through said embodiment;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary view of the horizontal section of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 and FIG. 7, respectively, are horizontal sections similar to FIG. 5 of second and third embodiments of the invention, wherein the core structure comprises metal channels or metal I-beams;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are horizontal sections similar to FIG. 5 of fourth and fifth embodiments of the invention, wherein the core structure comprises slabs or strips, respectively, of cellular synthetic polymer, e.g., cellular, expanded polystyrene;

FIG. 10 is a horizontal section similar to FIG. 5, wherein the core structure comprises slabs of honeycomb paper;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged, perspective, fragmentary view of the panel structure of FIGS. 1-5 with a shelf and its shelf-supporting structure mounted on skin of the panel structure;

FIG. 12 is a vertical, cross-sectioned view in fragment of the panel structures of FIGS. 1-5 with a shelf and second embodiment of shelf-supporting structure mounted on a skin of the panel structure;

FIG. 13 is an enlarged front elevation of the skin and one perforation therein;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary, front elevation of a species of honeycomb paper used in the embodiment of FIG. 10;

FIGS. 15 and 16 are horizontal, fragmentary sections of alternative forms of skin structures having shallow, vertical ribs therein;

FIG. 17 is a front, fragmentary elevation of another embodiment of the panel structures of the invention;

FIG. 18 is a section view taken on plane 18--18 of FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 is a fragmentary, rear perspective view of a shelf with hardware for mounting the shelf on the panel structure of FIG. 17;

FIG. 20 is a perspective view of a shelf support bracket;

FIG. 21 is a fragmentary elevation of a further embodiment of the panel structures of the invention; and

FIG. 22 is a fragmentary cross-section of the rear edge of a shelf with a hook-bearing C-channel thereon.

THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS

Referring to the drawings, and first to FIGS. 1-5, the panel structure 20 is mounted on a base 21 by suitable means (not shown) to support it rigidly thereon. The base 21 may be the base of a gondola. The panel structure 20 has supported thereon a plurality of removable and adjustable shelf structures 22, the details of which are hereinafter described.

The panel structure 20 comprises a core structure 23, a first skin 24 and a second skin 25. In the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5, the core structure comprises a plurality of vertical, wood strips having a depth dimension at least 1/8 inch, preferably at least 1/2 inch, e.g., 1 x 2 lumber strips. The panel structure may further include, if desired, a horizontal, bottom, wood plate 27, e.g., 1 × 2 or 2 × 2 lumber, and a horizontal top plate 28 of like lumber. For decorative purposes, the top edge of the panel structure may have thereon a thin cap strip 29.

At least one of, and generally both of, the skins 23 and 24 are perforated by a plurality of perforations 31 arranged in horizontally spaced, vertical columns 30 at spacings between columns ranging from about 1/2 inch to 12 inches, usually about 1 inch to 12 inches. The center to center distance between perforations in respective columns preferably is at least about 1/2 inch or 1 inch. The perforations may be round, oval, etc., but preferably are of substantially rectangular shape, principally for the purpose of providing a substantially flat lower edge adapted to support via hooks and/or studs on the shelving structure the vertically downward load force of the shelving load in a manner distributing the load force substantially along the entire bottom edge of the perforation.

The edges 32 of the wood strips 26 are secured substantially continually along the length of said edges to the rear faces 33 and 34 of the skins 24 and 25, e.g., by continuous or substantially continuous adhesive bonding therebetween. The vertical, wood strips are located along each vertical column of perforations and the contiguous faces 40 being in the order of zero to 1/2 inch. Preferably the faces 40 are substantially flush with the side edges of the perforations 31. The core structure has vertically elongated, hook or stud accommodating open spaces 35 behind respective columns of perforations.

The embodiments of FIGS. 6-10 are similar in most respects to the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5. Where applicable, like numerals designate like parts. The embodiments of FIGS. 6 and 7 use, instead of the vertical wood strips 26, a metal channel, e.g., a C-channel 36 having flat edge faces 37 adhesively secured to the rear faces 33 and 34 of the skins 24 and 25; or in the case of FIG. 8, metal I-beams 38, e.g., aluminum extrusions, having flat outer faces 39 on their flanges. The flat outer faces 39 are similarly adhesively mounted substantially continually along their lengths to the rear faces 33 and 34 of the skins 24 and 25. The inner edges 40a of the respective flanges are spaced from the side edges of the perforations 31 in a manner similar to the spacing aforedescribed with respect to faces 40.

The embodiment of FIG. 8 uses as the core structure slabs 41 of a cellular, light-weight, synthetic polymer, e.g., cellular, expanded polystyrene. These slabs have a width dimension equal to or slightly less than the horizontal spacing between vertical columns 30 of perforations 31. The faces 42 of the slabs 41 are adhesively bonded to the inner faces 33 and 34 of the skins 24 and 25.

In the right-hand portion of FIG. 8, the cellular, synthetic polymer slab 43 illustrates an alternative form for the core, wherein the width of the slab 43 is sufficient so that it extends across one or more column 30 of perforations 31. The faces 44 of the slab 43 are achesively secured to the rear faces 33 and 34 of the skins 24 and 25. Where the slab 43 extends across perforations 31, it is preferably provided with vertical grooves 45 to accommodate hooks or studs mounted in the perforations.

The faces 40 of FIGS. 8-10, 40b of slab 43, and 40c of grooves 45 are spaced from the side edges of the perorations 31 in a manner similar to the spacing aforedescribed with respect to faces 40 of FIGS. 5-7.

The embodiment of FIG. 9 differs from that of FIGS. 1-5 in the use of strips 46 of cellular, synthetic polymer in lieu of the wood strips 26. The depth of the strips 46 preferably is in the order of at least 1/2 inch, preferably at least 1 inch or more in that the cellular, synthetic polymer is weaker in tensile strength than wood strips.

In the embodiment of FIG. 10, the core structure is composed of slabs or strips 47 of honeycomb paper. Referring to FIG. 14, this honeycomb paper is composed of vertical paper strips 48 with undulating paper strips 49 therebetween, the apices 50 of which are adhesively bonded to the vertical strips 48. The edges of the strips 48 and 49 may be bonded directly to the inner faces 33 and 34 of the skins 24 and 25, or, alternatively, as shown in FIG. 10, the edges of the strips 48 and 49 may be bonded to heavy paper or light-weight cardboard paper sheeting 51, which in turn is adhesively bonded to said inner faces 33 and 34.

If desired, the substantially planar skins 24 and 25 may be provided with shallow, vertical ribbing 53 and 54 or 53a and 54a as shown in FIGS. 15 and 16. The depth of the ribbing preferably is in the order of 1/4 to 1/2 inch. Such ribbing may be used when the skins 24 and 25 are metal, synthetic polymer or in some instances pressed fiberboard, pressed woodchip board or wood. In the embodiment of FIG. 15, the ribs 53 and 54 are connected by diagonal sides 55. The perforations 31 are provided in a portion of the ribs 53 to provide the desired horizontal spacing between columns of the perforations 31. The core strips 26 are attached to the flat, rear faces of the ribs 54 by adhesive along each side of the columns of perforations in the contiguous, intermediary perforated rib 53. The embodiment of FIG. 16 is similar to the embodiment of FIG. 15, the primary difference being that the sides 55a of the ribs are substantially normal to the plane of the skin. Faces 40 are spaced from the side edges of the perforations as aforedescribed.

Referring to FIG. 11, the shelf structure 12 comprises a shelf 56 with two or more shelf support structures 57, i.e., arms or brackets which are removably or fixedly attached to the shelf 56. The shelf support structure 57 has projecting from its rear edge an upper, downwardly hooked member 58 and a lower downwardly hooked member 59. The hook members 58 and 59 are substantially L-shaped members having a width slightly less than the width of the perforations 31. The hooked members 58 and 59 are inserted through the perforations 31 until the downwardly depending legs thereof can slide behind the rear face of the skin 24, whereupon the shelf structure 12 is dropped into place with the hook members positioned as shown in FIG. 11. The horizontal leg 64 of the hooked members has a depth slightly greater than the thickness of the skin 24.

The front face 60 of the downwardly depending leg of the upper hooked member 58 bears against the rear face of the panel 24 immediately below the aperture 31. These contacting portions resist the horizontal component indicated by arrow 61 of the torque force applied by virtue of loading of the shelf structure 12. The remainder of the torque force in the opposite direction designated by arrow 62 is resisted by contact of the rear edge 63 of the arm or bracket 57 against the front face of the skin 24.

In the embodiment of FIG. 12 the shelf structure 12 is similar to that of FIG. 11. However, the rear edge of the arm of bracket 57 has an upper, upwardly hooked member 65 having a sufficient length of its vertical leg so that the front face 66 of the vertical leg bears against the inner face of the skin 24 above the upper edge of the perforation 31 to a significant extent, e.g., about 1/2 inch or more. This contact by the front face 66 against the inner face of the skin 24 resists the horizontal force designated by the arrow 67 of the aforesaid torque force of the loaded shelf. As in the embodiment of FIG. 11, the rear edge 68 of the arm or bracket 57 bears against the front face of the skin 24 to resist the horizontal component (designated by arrow 69) in the opposite direction from the aforesaid torque loading. A stud 70 projects rearwardly from the lower portion of the rear edge 68 and has a width slightly less than the width of the apertures 31.

The shelf structure of FIG. 12 is inserted in the perforated skin by tilting it upwardly to a sufficient degree so that the vertical leg of the upwardly hooked member 65 can pass through the perforation 31. Thereafter the shelf is pivoted downwardly until it assumes the seated position for its hooked member 65 and stud 70 as shown in FIG. 12.

The verticql force component (arrows 75) of the loaded shelving is carried by the lower surface 71 of the horizontal leg 64 of the hooked members 58 and 59 (FIG. 11) or the lower surface 71 of the stud 70 and horizontal leg 72 of the hooked member 65 (FIG. 12), which lower surfaces rest on and are borne by the bottom edges 73 of the perforations 31.

In general the dimensions of the perforations 31 are adequate to provide resistance to the loads imposed on the bottom edges 73 thereof and depend to some extent on the type of material from which the skins 24 and 25 are made. For wood, pressed fiberboard or pressed woodchip board, a width dimension a (FIG. 13) in the order of 1/8 inch to 3/4 inch is sufficient with spacings between shelf-supporting brackets or arms 57 in the order of 6 to 12 inches. With metal sheets (flat or ribbed), 20 or 22 gauge or thicker sheet metal is sufficient and the aforesaid width dimensions of the perforations are also applicable. When the skins 24 and/or 25 are made from synthetic polymer sheeting, it is desirable to increase the hotizontal spacing between the hooked members 64 or the hooked members 65 and stud 70 downwardly to the order of even 1 inch or 2 inches, i.e., in columns of apertures having horizontal spacings of 1 to 2 inches. The thickness of the wood, presed fiberboard or pressed woodchip board sheeting or panels providing the skins 24 and 25 is preferably in the range of 1/8 to 1/4 inch, which is also true in the case of synthetic polymer sheeting.

The height dimension a' (FIG. 13) of the perforations 31 is not critical. In general the rectangular perforations 31 may have a height dimension a' in the order of 1/2 to 1 inch. In the above-described illustrated embodiments, the rectangular perforations have a substantially square shape about 5/8 inch size and have rounded or filleted corners 74 of about 1/16 inch radius.

The embodiment of FIGS. 17 and 18 of the panel structure 75 has a core structure 76, a first skin 77, and a second skin 78. The core structure 76 comprises a plurality of vertical hardboard strips 79 having a thickness in the order of 1/4 inch ± 1/8 inch. The hardboard consists of chips or particles of wood and/or other fibrous material bonded together by a synthetic resin or plastic into a compact, relatively dense sheet.

Alternatively, though less preferably, the strips 79 may be made of particle board, which is also known in the trade as chipboard. Particle board is a resin or plasticbonded sheet of wood chips and/or other fibrous materials, but has less compactness or density than hardboard. It also has less structural strength than hardboard, particularly in terms of tensile, compression, and bending strengths. Therefore, when using particle board, the depth dimension of the particle board strips 79 is greater than would be the case for hardboard strips for substantially identical maximum load characteristics for the overall panel structure 75. Preferably, the particle board strips 79 should have a minimum depth dimension of about 3/16 inch, and a maximum depth dimension of slightly less than the spacing between columns of perforations in the perforated skin or skins of the panel structure, e.g., 1 inch.

The panel structure 75 has a first skin 77 and a second skin 78. These skins are adhesively bonded to the vertical edges of the strips 79 in the manner heretofore described with respect to the previous embodiments. As illustrated, the first skin 77 has substantially rectangular perforations 82 arranged in vertical rows or columns 83. As compared with the embodiment of FIGS. 2 and 3, the vertical rows or columns 83 of perforations 82 are more closely spaced, i.e., a spacing in the order of 1/2 inch to 1 1/2 inch, preferably about 1 inch. The vertical strips 79 differ in orientation from the vertical strips of the embodiment of FIGS. 2 and 3 in that only one strip 79 is used between each vertical row or column 83 of perforations 82. Because such columns are more closely spaced in the embodiment of FIGS. 17 and 18, the bonding between the edges of the strip 79 and the skin 77 is sufficiently close to the edges of the perforations 82 to provide the desired resistance to bowing of the shelf-supporting skin 77 due to the previously-described torque forces occurring at the shelf-load supporting perforations.

The second ski 78, as illustrated, is a solid non-perforated sheet or skin. It may have, however, vertical rows or columns 83 of perforations 82 like those shown for the skin 77 for those panel structures where shelves are to be supported on both faces or skins.

The skins 77 and 78 preferably are made of sheets of hardboard having the thicknesses aforedescribed. Where, however, the shelf is supported by the hardware of the type shown in FIG. 19, and particularly without additional, underlying shelf support brackets, the thicknesses of the perforated skins 77 and/or 78 preferably are at least about 3/16 inch.

Panel structure 75 may further include, if desired, a horizontal wood, hardboard, or particle board plate similar to plate 27 of FIG. 2. It may also include a horizontal top plate 84 of wood, hardboard or particle board.

The vertical rows or columns 83 of perforations 82 have the above described close spacing in order to accommodate shelf-supporting hardware of the type illustrated in FIG. 19. This hardware comprises a rolled metal strip 85 which is fixedly mounted to the rear edge portion 86 of a shelf 87, the latter being made of wood, hardboard, or particle board, or any other suitable material. The upper face 88 of the shelf has a groove 89 extending longitudinally thereof and spaced inwardly from the rear edge of the shelf 87. This groove receives a vertical tongue 90 of the strip 85. The upper face 91 of the rear portion 86 of the shelf 87 is milled so that the upper face 92 of the upper horizontal leg 93 of the strip 85 lies substantially flush with the upper face 88 of the shelf.

The rear, vertical leg 94 of the strip 85 is substantially at right angles to the leg 93, and may lie flush against or be spaced from the rear edge of the shelf 87. The leg 94 has a plurality of struck-out pieces 95 respectively composed of a horizontal leg 96 and a terminal, downwardly extending, vertical leg 97 to form hook-like members, adapted to extend through and hook behind the perforations 82 when the shelf is mounted on the perforated skin 77.

The horizontal or longitudinal spacings between the hook-like pieces 95 correspond with the spacings between vertical rows or columns 83 of perforations, whereby each perforation in a horizontal row is used for the support of the shelf 87. If desired, however, there may be a lesser number of hook-like members 95 so that such members project into perforations every second, every third, etc. vertical row or column 83.

The strip 85 has a lower portion 98 whick materially improves the torque load capabilities of the shelf structure. The lower portion 98 is composed of a short, horizontal leg 99 lying against the underside of the shelf 87 in a manner securely mounting the strip 85 along the rear edge of the shelf. It further comprises a U-bend 100 between the leg 99 and a convexly bowed leg 101. The lower edge 102 of the leg 101 lies substantially in the plane of the outer face of the leg 94 so that the lower portion 102 rests against the outer face of the perforated skin 80 below the horizontal row of perforations 82 in which the hook-like members 95 are mounted.

The remainder of the shelf-mounting strip 85 comprises a strip 103 extending diagonally upwardly from the lower portion 102 to a forwardly disposed, substantially vertical tongue 104, which seats in a longitudinal groove 105 in the underside of the shelf 87. Torque loads on the shelf 87 resulting from loadings thereof are borne mainly by the rear faces of the vertical legs 97 of the hook-like members 95, pressing against the rear face of the perforated panel 80 just below the respective perforations 82 and by forces transferred through the tongue 104 and diagonal strip 103 to the lower portion 102, which rests against the outer face of the perforated skin 80.

The vertical leg 97 of the hook-like members 95 rests against the rear face of the perforated skin 77 just below the bottom edge of the respective perforations 82. The horizontal leg 96 rests on the bottom edge of the respective perforations 82. This interfitting of the hook-like members 95 and perforations 82, particularly at spacings between hooklike members 95 in the order of 1 inch ± 1/4 inch, gives the shelf sufficient support in terms of torque resistant forces to support relatively heavy loads without use of shelf-supporting brackets.

FIG. 20 illustrates a shelf-supporting bracket 106 made from a metal stamping. This bracket may be used optionally to enhance the torque-load capabilities of such shelf. The bracket 106 is composed of a substantially triangular sheet or piece 107 provided with right angle bends along each of its three sides to provide an upper, horizontal strip 108, a rear vertical strip 109, and a diagonal strip 110. The vertical strip 109 rests against the outer face of the perforated screen 80. The shelf 87 rests on the horizontal strip 108.

FIG. 22 shows a shelf 87 with a C-channel mounting strip 80 having hook-like pieces 95 like those of FIG. 19. The bracket 106 may be secured to the underside of the shelf 87 by any suitable means, e.g., by a forwardly projecting hook-like member 111 which locks in a hook-accommodating space 81 above a hook-receiving slot or hold 81a in the lower leg of the C-channel. The bracket may also have a tongue 112 which projects into a hole or groove (not shown) in the underside of the shelf 87.

The bracket 106 is held on the underside of the shelf 87 by engagement of its hook-like member 111 in the hook-accommodating space 81, which relationship remains so long as the shelf is substantially horizontal and presses the strip 109 against the outer face of the perforated skin 80. Its strip 110 functions as a strengthening rib which, together with the sheet or piece 107 and tongue 112 transfer torque load on the shelf 87 against the outer face of the perforated skin 80.

The shelf-supporting strips and shelf brackets above described and illustrated in FIGS. 19, 20 and 22 are described in greater detail in a co-pending application for a joint invention of Henry Safford Peacock, Paul Durham, and Merle Baker, and are described herein solely for the purpose of illustrating a mode of mounting shelves on the panel structure illustrated in FIGS. 17 and 18.

The embodiment of FIG. 21 is alike in most respects to the embodiment in FIGS. 17 and 18, where applicable, like numerals designate like parts. The embodiment of FIG. 21 differs principally in the configuration of perforations 82a, which are round instead of rectangular. When using the round perforations, the hook-like members 95 illustrated in FIGS. 19 and 22 may, if desired be cylindrical pins bent into a similar hook-like configuration.

The invention thus provides new concepts in perforated panel structures for the support by the sandwich panel skin or skins themselves of adjustable shelving capable of bearing relatively heavy shelf loads. The joinder of the two skins via core members with substantially continuous bonding of the edges thereof to the skins and close spacing between the skin-bonded edges of the core members and the side edges of the perforations provides an integrated structure wherein the opposite skin and the contiguous core members coact to eliminate essentially any bowing of the shelf-supporting skin due to the aforesaid torque forces at all shelf-load-supporting perforations.

It is thought that the invention and its numerous attendant advantages will be fully understood from the foregoing description, and it is obvious that numerous changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the several parts without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention, or sacrificing any of its attendant advantages, the forms herein disclosed being preferred embodiments for the purpose of illustrating the invention.