Title:
EXERCISING METHOD FOR REDUCING VOLUME OF HUMAN TISSUE IN REGIONS OF THE ABDOMEN
United States Patent 3843117


Abstract:
Volume of excess semi-fluid tissue in hypogastric and umbilical and related regions of the human operator's abdomen is selectively reduced by manipulation of operator-powered impact producing apparatus to selectively develop forced oscillations in such tissue and express liquid therefrom. The apparatus comprises an elongated container having rigid end walls and an interemdiate wall forming a closed chamber. The inside of the chamber is partially filled with a fluent material. On the end walls of the container are located rigid handles, each of which extends laterally from the end wall to which it is attached. By these handles, a user holds the device with his or her hands in order to perform the above mentioned manipulation.



Inventors:
JOHNSON L
Application Number:
05/379255
Publication Date:
10/22/1974
Filing Date:
07/16/1973
Assignee:
JOHNSON L,US
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/111
International Classes:
A63B21/072; A63B21/06; (IPC1-7): A63B23/02
Field of Search:
272/57R,81,84
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2528213Bar bellOctober 1950Dantolan
2509810Calisthenic barMay 1950Core, Jr.



Other References:

Christensen, Vera, "The Real Truth About Exercise and the Bust," Strength and Health, January, 1970, pp. 54,55,77,78..
Primary Examiner:
Oechsle, Anton O.
Assistant Examiner:
Stouffer R. T.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Silverman, Ely
Parent Case Data:


REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of my co-pending U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 196,958, filed Nov. 9, 1971, entitled EXERCISING APPARATUS AND METHOD as filed now U.S. Pat. No. 3,756,592 issued Sept. 4, 1973, entitled CONTAINER FOR USE AS EXERCISING APPARATUS HAVING FLUENT MASS THEREIN.
Claims:
I claim

1. Process for reducing the volume of human subcutaneous extramuscular semi-fluid tissue in umbilical and hypogastric regions of the abdomen which comprises the steps of repeatedly and continuously applying to the hands at elbow level with the forearms bent inwardly at an angle to their respective upper arms and the hands at elbow level alternating leftward and rightward sharp impact while the feet and neck and collarbone are fixed in position and causing the hips to rotate and said semi-fluid tissue to jolt in alternating leftward and rightward direction with sufficient impulse to distend and produce a palpable protrusion in the skin immediately overlying such semi-fluent tissue and express liquid from such tissue.

2. Process as in claim 1 wherein the operator's feet are touching each other and said operator is a female.

3. Process as in claim 2 wherein said oscillation of said container is continued for a period of time from 3 to 10 minutes at a rate of 20 oscillations each 6 to 10 seconds.

4. Process as in claim 3 wherein the weight of the fluent mass is within the range of 25 percent to 200 percent of the weight of the said semi-fluent tissue.

5. Process as in claim 4 wherein between impacts center of gravity of the fluent mass moves a lateral distance less than the width of said operator's hips, and a greater distance than one-third of such distance.

6. Process as in claim 1 wherein an erect operator holds and oscillates a fluent mass within a container therefor to alternately produce said leftward and rightward sharp impacts on said operator's subcutaneous semi-fluid tissue in umbilical and hypogastric regions of the abdomen of said operator.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The field of art to which this invention pertains is exercising apparatuses.

2. Description of the Prior Art

A mass of semi-fluid tissue frequently develops and accumulates in women after childbirth and in middle age in both men and women below the skin and external to the muscle layers in the anterior umbilical and hypogastric or pubic regions of the abdomen and, also, in the anterior lumbar and inguinal regions of the abdomen and, in the back, between the muscles and the skin in the lumbar region (the region of the lumbar vertebrae). This mass of semi-fluid tissue is substantially unresponsive to all prior attempts at removal by massage, known exercises or diet although diuretics effect reduction in its volume. The instant apparatus and its process of use is successfully directed at safely, conveniently and efficiently selectively reducing the volume of such tissue.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This apparatus and method selectively causes the mass of semi-fluid tissue in the umbilical and hypogastric regions of the anterior abdomen of an operator of the apparatus and method to oscillate at a sufficiently rapid frequency to express fluid from such tissue. Such oscillation is effected by applying sufficiently rapidly repeated sharp impacts to such tissue to express liquid from such tissue and thus deplete such tissue of its liquid content and, accordingly, reduce the bulk thereof.

The impacts are provided by the method using synergistic combination of the impact producing apparatus with the skeleton and musculature of the operator to substantially selectively apply impulses to such tissues.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view of an operator using one apparatus 30 of this invention; this figure is shown broken away to show some of the relationships of the pelvic girdle of the skeleton to the remainder of the body of the operator during use of the apparatus.

FIGS. 2 and 3 are front views of an operator 40 in two different stages of operation of the apparatus 30 at the two most lateral extents of its motion; FIG. 2 shows the apparatus 30 at the right side of the operator; FIG. 3 shows the apparatus 30 at the left side of the operator.

FIG. 4 diagrammatically shows the skeleton of an operator to show some of the relations of joints and bony structures referred to in the following description of the use of the apparatus 30.

FIGS. 5-12 are each a diagrammatic view on vertical longitudinal section 5B--5B of FIG. 14 to show the position of the fluent mass 37 in the interior of apparatus 30 at each of several sequential stages in the process of operation of the apparatus 30 according to the process of this invention.

FIG. 13 is a front view of apparatus 30, partly broken away, to show the interior thereof.

FIG. 14 is an end view along direction of arrow 13A of FIG. 13 to show a side view of apparatus 30.

FIGS. 15 through 22 are diagrammatic showings of horizontal transverse sections through the plane 15A--15A of FIG. 1 and show, with some diagrammatic exaggeration, the position of the torso 39 and semi-fluent tissues 64 and 63 of operator 40 during the operation of the apparatus 30 at various positions of the apparatus 30 relative to the operator 40.

FIG. 23 is a front view of apparatus 130 partly broken away to show the interior thereof.

FIG. 24 is an end view along direction of arrow 24A of FIG. 23.

FIG. 25 is a top view along direction of arrow 25A of FIG. 23.

In reference to all the figures herein right and left are the right and left of the figure as the figure faces the reader hereof rather than the right and left of the reader viewing the figures.

The definitions of regions of the abdomen as used herein are set out at page 3 of column 3 of Webster's New International Dictionary -- Merriam Co. Publishers, 1961, Second Edition Unabridged and Gray's Anatomy, page 1,136 and 1,138, 23rd Edition, Lea and Ferbiger, Philadelphia, 1936.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The apparatus 30 comprises a flat imperforate rigid left end wall 31, a flat imperforate rigid circular right end wall 32 and an imperforate rigid intermediate wall of right cylindrical shape 33 therebetween and firmly and rigidly joined at its ends to the walls 31 and 32.

The end walls 31 and 32 are parallel to each other and, with the wall 33, encompass a right cylindrical chamber 34.

A rigid left U-shaped handle 35 is firmly and rigidly attached at its central upper and lower ends to outside of the left end wall 31 and a rigid right U-shaped handle 36 is firmly and rigidly attached at its central upper and lower ends to the outside of right end wall 32. Both handles have the same size, shape and weight; each handle extends in the vertical plane; i.e., parallel to each other, and extends laterally in direction of length of central longitudinal axis of the intermediate wall 33 and perpendicularly to the end wall to which attached. Each handle is symmetrical about the central longitudinal axis of wall 33.

A mass of sand 37 is located within the chamber 34. Its upper surface 38 does not reach to the middle diameter of the chamber 34. Walls 31, 32 and 33 form an air-tight rigid container 39: the handles extend transversely to the length of said container.

In the particular embodiment shown the container 39 has a length left to right as shown in FIG. 13 of 61/2 inches and a height of 5 inches. The handles are made of 1/8 inch steel with ribbon therearound to a total thickness of 1/4 inch. The walls 31 and 32 are 0.010 inch thick, the wall 33 is 0.015 inch thick and the container itself weighes 10 ounces and has an interior volume of 125 cubic inches.

The sand has a volume of 321/2 cubic inches and weighs 64 ounces. The particle size is about +0.005 inch to -0.020 inch, and free flowing and chemically inert and non-powdery.

An erect female operator 40, shown in FIGS. 1-3 in front view, standing erect with clothing loose around the abdominal region holds the apparatus 30 by its handles 35 and 36. In this operation the lady operator 40 stands flatfooted and erect facing forward, with shoulders parallel to a line across the side-to-side width of her head and parallel the floor with left foot 61 and right foot 62 touching. The left ankle 59 and right ankle 60 are also close or touching each other and the two feet 61 and 62 are parallel and pointed straight forward at right angles to a line between the shoulders of the operator. In this position also the left and right knees 55 and 56, respectively, of the operator also are in contact or within 1/2 inch of each other. The upper left and right arms, 41 and 42, of the operator 40 are vertical and her elbows 43 and 44 are at her waistline. The operator's hands 45 and 46 hold the handles 35 and 36, respectively with hands 45 and 46 at vertical level of the elbows 43 and 44. The operator then shakes the apparatus 30 by rapidly and repeatedly moving it from the right side of the body at the same height, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 22, along a horizontal line spaced forward of the operator's abdomen to the left side of operator's body as shown in FIGS. 3 and 18.

More particularly, on repeated cycles of movement of apparatus 30 and operator 40 from the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 22 to the position shown in FIGS. 3 and 18 and back again to the position of FIGS. 2 and 22 at a frequency of 19 to 20 times in 51/2 to 6 seconds the semi-fluent tissue 64 of the torso 49, which tissue is located exteriorly of the muscles that encompass the umbilical and hypogastric regions of the abdomen is rapidly moved and jolted in such manner and degree as to provide for reduction in the volume of such tissue, as is more fully described herebelow. Such reduction is effected without chafing or bruising the skin and safely by this method and apparatus.

In operation the operator 40 repeatedly moves the apparatus 30 leftwards from the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 22 and 12 to the position shown in FIGS. 3 and 18 and 8, then back rightwardly to the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 22. As seen from the front and diagrammatically shown in FIGS. 8 and 12 the contents of the chamber 34 are vigorously thrown with some impact so that the upper surface 38 of the mass 37 in the apparatus 30 flows first (on leftward motion) against the left wall 31 in the position of the apparatus 30 shown in FIGS. 3 and 8 and 18. The movement of the apparatus in a direction toward the right side of the operator, i.e., a movement in the direction of the arrow 71 of FIG. 18, moves the apparatus 30 toward the operator's right and the fluent mass of sand 37 in the chamber 34 develops momentum in the sand resulting from such motion from the position shown in FIGS. 3 and 8 and 18 to the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 12 and 22. That motion of the apparatus 30 in the direction of arrow 71; i.e. from the left of the operator to the operator's right initiates a piling up of such material in a vertically extending column at wall 32 (c.f. FIG. 12). Subsequent motion toward the operator's left as shown in FIGS. 15-17 moves apparatus 30 and provides impact against wall 31.

As the apparatus 30 moves to the left and the operator reduces the speed of the apparatus 30 in a direction toward the operator's left the fluent mass slides toward the left hand end 31 and upper surface thereof assumes the shape as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. Still further motion to the left of the operator with a deceleration concommitant on imminent reversal of motion causes the sandy mass 37 to shift very dramatically from the higher portion on the righthand side as in FIG. 7 to the lefthand side 31 of the container. On initial movement of the operator's left hand 45 toward the operator's right the fluent mass 37 continues its motion toward that wall due at least in part to the momentum of the mass 37 resulting from its motion from the position thereof in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 as well as the prior motion to the left of the operator's hands 46 and 45. Position in FIGS. 2, 12 and 22 is a point of high acceleration with the mass 37 piled up against the right hand wall 32. Continued motion of the operator's hands 46 and 45 toward the operator's left with a greater velocity (but less acceleration) than at the position of FIG. 5 to the position of maximum velocity toward the left as shown diagrammatically in FIG. 6 provides orientation of the mass 37 as shown in FIG. 6 wherein the surface 38 is less steeply sloped than in FIG. 5 because of the lowered rate of leftward acceleration during such movement and the influence of gravity to level the surface 38 to a horizontal position. Further motion of the apparatus 30 toward the operator's left as shown in FIG. 7 provides that the mass 37 is more evenly distributed over the bottom of the container 33 because the acceleration then has a minimum value. Fluent mass 37 then moves from the position shown in FIGS. 7 and 17 to that shown in FIGS. 8 and 18. With such further motion of the apparatus 30 toward the position of the operator 40 and the apparatus 30 shown in FIGS. 3 and 18 with a definite deceleration of the container of apparatus 30 to the left or acceleration to the right the mass 37 shifts strongly within container 35 to the lefthand side of the container 35 and the surface 38, due to the momentum of the mass 37 (because of the motion of the apparatus 30 from the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 22 to the position shown in FIG. 17) urges the mass 37 against lefthand wall 31, forming an impact against the wall 31 as shown in FIGS. 8 and 18.

Following this position of the apparatus 30 and operator 40 the operator's left hand then moves the container 35 toward the right of the operator and this in turn, due to the momentum of the mass 37 moving from the position shown in FIGS. 7 (and 17) with the motion of the wall 31 from the lefthand side of the operator toward the right continues an impact by and concentration of the mass 37 against that lefthand wall 31.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 4 the human female anatomy is arranged so that the spine 48 is attached to the hip bone 47 with the most forward or anterior part 50 of the spine close to but above the hip bone in a vertical line substantially over the straight line joining the joints in which the L-shaped femurs or thigh bones 51 and 52 are seated in the seats (acetabulums) therefor as 53 and 54 in the hip bone 47. Accordingly the bone structure and ligaments of the knees and hips provide for a relatively easily effected rotating action of the hips 49 of the operator about a vertical axis passing through the anterior portion 50 of the spine during this operation.

On initiation of operation of this process by the operator 40 the head and neck and collarbone and shoulderblades of the operator are held in a fixed location and position, mainly facing straight ahead and level as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. Starting at position of FIGS. 2 and 22 with the shoulders at such fixed location and position the muscles on the right side of the operator's chest draw the right arm 42 toward the operator's left; at the same time the muscles on the left side of the back draw the left arm to the left of the operator (generally as shown in FIG. 15). Such movement causes a slight rotation of the hips, (as seen from above) in a clockwise direction as shown sequentially in FIGS. 22, 15 and 16 with some exaggeration to more effectively illustrate such movement.

At and near the left end of travel of the apparatus 30, while the head, neck and shoulderblade and the collarbone are still in the same fixed position, as at the initiation of the operation, and when the hipbones are in and near their most clockwise position, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 18 the muscles of the left side of the operator's chest then draw upon and move the left arm and hand toward the right side of the operator and the muscles on the right side of the back draw upon and move the right arm 42 and hand toward the right side of the operator 40 and the operator's hips begin to and do turn counterclockwise (as seen from above) as shown in FIGS. 19, 20 and 21.

This clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of the hipbone 48 (or pelvis) is a result of the above described arm movements and resistance due to inertia of fluent mass 37 in chamber 34 to such movements and that the bones of the chest are relatively firmly attached to the spine, as are the muscles of the back; hence such movements of the arms and apparatus 30 in each direction causes the chest bones and spine and hip bone or pelvic girdle 47 to move in the opposite direction. Such tendency to move the chest bones, spine and pelvic girdle effects such movement because of the relatively free rotation of the hip or pelvic girdle on the ball and socket joints 53 and 54 for the thighbones 51 and 52 and the back and forth pivotal motion of shin bones 57 and 58 at anklejoints 59 and 60 in the erect posture of the operator 40, in combination with the fixed position of the operator's feet 61 and 62 on the floor and the fixed position of the head and neck and collarbone and the elastic pivoting about a vertical axis permitted the pelvic girdle by the bones and joints and muscles near the spine and pelvic girdle of the operator.

The impulse applied to the apparatus 30 by the fluent mass 37 is applied to the skeletal frame of the operator 40 at each extreme position; i.e., at each extreme position as in FIG. 2 and FIG. 22 and the opposite positions of FIGS. 3 and 18. Impulse provided by such impact applied to the ends of the apparatus 30 is transmitted to the semi-fluent tissue at front zone 64 and rear zone 63 which are the movable members of a connected series of elastically deformable yet relatively rigid elements; i.e., the arm bones, the chest bones 69, back bone or spine 48 and the muscles attached to the backbone, with flesh at zones 63 and 64 supported at the exterior of the muscles being relatively freely movable. Thereby the semi-fluid tissues at zones 63 and 64 are rapidly jolted as if the impact developed in the apparatus 30 was directly applied to such tissues. Such impact depends upon the velocity of the mass 37. It is not necessary that the mass 37 be large enough to effect the position of the torso to the degree as is diagrammatically shown in FIGS. 15 through FIG. 22 although such movement of the torso does occur to a slight degree. Accordingly, the operation of the apparatus 30 provides that there is a transmittal of kinetic energy from the impulse of the moving mass 37 to the masses of semi fluent tissue in generally the same manner as when there is a square or full impact between one moving billiard ball and a series of stationary and adjacent billiard balls arrayed in a straight line when the impulse of the moving ball imparts its energy through the elastically deformable series of elements to the movable body at the end of such series.

More particularly, the impulse of the fluent mass 37 in apparatus 30 against the left hand 45 of the operator is transmitted to the right elbow, right arm, shoulder and then the spine 48 of the operator and thence to the muscles in the zone of the umbilical and right and left lumbar regions of the operator. These are tense and elastic tissues and transmit the energy of the impact to a mass of movable tissue at zone 64 and give such tissue an equal impulse in the direction that the mass 37 has been theretofore traveling. When the mass 37 moves to the operator's right as shown in FIGS. 18-22 the fluent mass provides a substantial impulse and impact in the direction rightwards of the operator 40; the movable tissue 64 is then moved sharply in the rightward direction as shown in FIG. 22. There is superimposed upon this rapid vibrational movement of the mass 64 the slight twisting of the torso as is shown in FIGS. 15 through 22. This twist motion of the torso is measured by the movement of the superior iliac spine of the pelvis 47: such twisting of the hips provides only for a motion of about 1/2 inch backwards and forwards from the position shown in FIG. 22 to the position shown in FIG. 18. In the operation provided herein the slight mass of the apparatus 30 has no great momentum developed yet the impact is effectively applied through the rigid and elastic portions of the body to the freely movable tissues supported in the region of the hip bones, as 64 (and 63).

The leftward impact of the mass 37 at the left hand end of travel as shown in FIGS. 3 and 18 is thus applied to the operator's hands and arms and skeletal frame (including chest bones and spine and pelvic girdle). Such members of the skeletal frame elastically change their position and then elastically return to their position and thereby transmit the elastic deformation due to such impact to the umbilical semi fluent tissue: such impact is so effected to rapidly as to so rapidly shift or jolt such semi fluent tissue at zone 64 still further to the operator's left that the skin of the operator immediately overlying such semi fluent tissue is distended and protrudes outwardly and laterally of its normal position. Such protrusion shows and is palpable as showing a shifting of liquid from one portion of such umbilical and hypogastric semi-fluent tissue to another zone of such tissue normally laterally leftward thereof. The pulse of tissue is particularly palpable and noticeable at the left inguinal and left lumbar regions of the abdomen.

The rightward impact of the mass 37 at the right hand end of travel as shown in FIGS. 2 and 22 is applied to the operator's hands and arms and skeletal frame (including chest bones and spine and pelvic girdle). Such members of the skeletal frame elastically change their position and then elastically return to their position and thereby transmit the elastic deformation due to such impact to the umbilical semi-fluent tissue: such impact is so effected (as above) as to so rapidly shift or jolt such semi-fluent tissue at zone 64 still further to the operator's right that the skin of the operator immediately overlying such semi-fluent tissue is distended and protrudes outwardly and laterally of its normal position. Such protrusion shows and is palpable as showing a shifting of liquid from one portion of such umbilical and hypogastric semi-fluent tissue to another zone of such tissue normally laterally rightward thereof. The pulse of tissue is particularly palpable and noticeable at the right lumbar and right inguinal regions of the abdomen.

The motion of the operation of the preferred embodiment of apparatus 30 above described requires only a total of 8 inches movement of the operator's hands from the position of the apparatus 30 in FIG. 2 to its position shown in FIG. 3. FIGS. 2 and 3 are to scale. Generally the width of the apparatus 30 is about one half the width of the hips of the user and the movement is about one and one half times the right to left length of the chamber 34. The length of the movement should be greater than the length of the apparatus but the total movement of the apparatus should be no greater than movement concomitant on the operator moving her left hand no further left than the lateral extent of the leftmost extent of the body, and moving the right hand no further right than the lateral extent of the rightmost extent of the body with a length of movement in excess of the length of the chamber across which the fluent mass travels to create the impact that is applied to the semi-fluent tissue in the hypogastric and umbilical regions of the abdomen.

While principal interest is in reducing the bulk of the mass of the semi-fluent subcutaneous tissues exterior to the muscles at the front of the abdomen in the umbilical and hypogastric zones (64), extra-muscular subcutaneous semi-fluent tissue at rear of the operator's body near to the top of the pelvic girdle is also similarly acted upon as shown in FIGS. 15-22 and reduced size as above described for zone referred to as 63.

In the preferred embodiment about 5 minute periods of operation as above described in relation to FIGS. 5-12 and 15-21 are preferred once a day with clothing loose about the waist and hips. Such a program of use with a female operator 5 feet 5 inches tall in stocking feet weighing 149 pounds reduced her weight to 135 pounds during a one-month period of usual diet and absence of stress. The operator usually experiences passage of larger amounts of water following the use of apparatus 30 above described. In the above described program of use the operator experienced a reduction in measurement around the body between the crest of the pelvic girdle and the hip joint 53 and 54; i.e., at the section shown as 15A--15A in FIG. 1, of 3 to 4 inches.

While the particular size and shape of container are a preferred embodiment, similarly functioning apparatuses may also be used, with the fluent mass formed of sufficiently large particles as to not escape from the container therefor, thus the container should be imperforate where a liquid or a liquid slurry is used but a perforated container may be used where only solid particulate material is used so long as the particles of the fluent mass have, like the mass of sand 37, substantially no elasticity as a mass so that as much as possible of the kinetic energy of motion of the fluent mass 37 shown in FIGS. 5-12 is converted to impact and the particles are of a sufficiently large size to not pass through the perforations. The material used should be sufficiently mechanically stable to not break down during the above described motion shown in FIGS. 5-12. The container 39 should have a weight of less than 1 pound to minimize the momentum aspects of the oscillation of the apparatus and accentuate the impact forces. If it is air-tight as in container 39 changes in humidity do not change the fluidity of the mass 37.

Other materials of similar total weight and rigidity may be used for the container; e.g., plastic and glass with rounded edges but metal is preferred for weight and safety means.

The mass 37 should be within the range of 25 percent to 200 percent of the weight of the semi-fluent tissue 64 for the reduction of which the apparatus 30 is used. The amount of travel of the apparatus 30 (position of FIG. 2 to position of FIG. 3) provides that the center of gravity of the fluent mass 37 moves a lateral distance less than the width of the operator's hips, and a greater distance than one-third of such distance.

As shown in FIGS. 13 and 14 a ribbon, as 73, may be attached to both of the handles to render the appearance of apparatus 30 more appealing and the exterior of the container colored in pastel shades.

The apparatus 130 comprises a flat imperforate rigid left end wall 131, a flat imperforate rigid circular right end wall 132 and an imperforate rigid intermediate wall of right cylindrical shape 133 therebetween and firmly and rigidly joined at its ends to the walls 131 and 132.

The ends walls 131 and 132 are parallel to each other and, with the wall 133, encompass a right cylindrical chamber 134.

A rigid left U-shaped handle 135 is firmly and rigidly attached at its central upper and lower ends to outside of the left end wall 131 and a rigid right U-shaped handle 136 is firmly and rigidly attached at its central upper and lower ends to the outside of right end wall 132. Both handles have the same size, shape and weight; each handle extends in the vertical plane; i.e., parallel to each other, and extends laterally in direction of length of central longitudinal axis of the intermediate wall 133 and perpendicularly to the end wall to which attached. Each handle is symmetrical about the central longitudinal axis of wall 133 and is composed of a top straight portion 161 on handle 135 (and 162 on handle 136), a middle straight portion 163 on handle 135 (and 164 on handle 136) and a bottom straight portion 165 on handle 135 (and 166 on handle 136); each handle is symmetrical about the central longitudinal axis of wall 33. The top portion of each handle 135 and 136 is firmly joined to an end wall 131 and 132 respectively with the top of the upper portions 161 and 162 and the bottom of the lower portions 165 and 166 tangent to the outer surface of wall 33. The top portion 161 of handle 135 is joined by a curved portion 167 of 3/4 inch outside diameter to the vertical extending rigid cylindrical portion 163; the portion 163 is firmly joined by a curved portion 169 to the bottom straight portion 165.

A mass of sand 137 is located within the chamber 134. Its upper surface 138 does not reach to the middle diameter of the chamber 134. Walls 131, 132 and 133 form an air-tight rigid container 139.

The top portion 162 of handle 136 is joined by a curved portion 168 of 3/4 inch outside diameter to the vertical extending rigid cylindrical portion 164; the portion 164 is firmly joined by a curved portion 170 to the bottom straight portion 166.

In embodiment 130, the container 139 (not including the handles 131 and 132, as is also the case in above description of embodiment 30) has an overall outside length, left to right, of 7-1/8 inch and an overall outside height (as shown in FIG. 23) of 4-1/2 inches. The handles 135 and 136 are made of 3/32 inch thick solid plastic tubing of 1/2 inch outside diameter and project 2 inches laterally of the walls 131 and 132, respectively. The walls 131 and 132 are each 0.045 inches thick and smooth interiorly and exteriorly; the wall 133 is 0.040 inch thick and also smooth inside and out. The empty container 139, with handles 131 and 132 thereon, weigh a total of 4-1/2 ounces without the sand 137.

The material used for walls 131, 132, and 133 and handles 135 and 146 is high density polyethyene.

The chamber 134 of the container 139 (the volume within walls 131, 132, and 133) has a volume of 111 cubic inches. The sand 137 has a volume of 32 cubic inches (29 percent of volume of container 139) and weighs 32 ounces. The diameter of the sand grains forming the mass 137 ranges from 0.010 to 0.040 inch and the particles of that particulate mass 137, like 37, are free-flowing and chemically inert.

The apparatus 130 also provides, according to the process of use set out above for apparatus 30 as above described, sharp impact development and passage of such impact to the operator's tissues, as 64 and 63, that are, as above described, pivotally rotatable about the operator's spine as the axis of rotation. Apparatus 130 depends, as does apparatus 30, for such impact action on the amount of area of the end walls 131 and 132 and the impact of the semifluent mass 137 on such walls, as is above described for the action of the mass 37 on end walls 31 and 32 in embodiment 30.