Title:
GOLF BOARD GAME APPARATUS
United States Patent 3826498


Abstract:
A golf game including a game board bearing designations of a golf hole including the tee, the green, the fairway and the rough. Yardage designations are on the game board as well as designations of hazards, penalties and bonuses. The game also includes four sets of distinguishable dice. The dice of two sets bear numerical indicia and one or more of the dice of each set may be rolled to generate a yardage indication. A table is provided designating various golf clubs and the dice of the first two sets that should be employed to obtain such yardage. The third and fourth sets of dice each consist of a single die, with the die of the third set bearing designations indicating whether a putt has been sunk or missed and the die of the fourth set having designations regarding shot direction.



Inventors:
MONEK F
Application Number:
05/322933
Publication Date:
07/30/1974
Filing Date:
01/12/1973
Assignee:
MONEK F,US
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/146
International Classes:
A63F7/06; A63F3/00; A63F9/04; (IPC1-7): A63F3/00
Field of Search:
273/134,146
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3658339SIMULATED GOLF BOARD GAME APPARATUS1972-04-25Boileau
3195895Word game apparatus comprising die and score card1965-07-20Kropinski
2238079Indoor game1941-04-15Scheib
1638365Golf-simulating game1927-08-09Ryan
1513941Game1924-11-04Smith



Foreign References:
GB229209A
GB391190A
GB1142362A
GB1164053A
Primary Examiner:
Lowe, Delbert B.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Hofgren, Wegner, Allen, Stellman & McCord
Claims:
I claim

1. A golf game comprising:

2. a green,

3. a tee,

4. a fairway,

5. the rough adjacent the fairway on both sides thereof,

6. The golf game of claim 1 wherein each of said two sets of dice includes at least three dice and each of said third and fourth sets of dice consists of a single die.

7. The golf game of claim 2 wherein the dice of said two sets each are six-sided and the die of said fourth set has a number of sides in excess of six.

8. The golf game of claim 2 wherein the die of said fourth set has a number of flat sides in excess of six, some of said sides being larger than others of said sides, whereby the sides opposite said some sides have a greater probability of showing after a roll than the sides opposite said other sides, a majority of the sides opposite said some sides bearing indicia which may be regarded as designating hooks or slices.

9. The golf game of claim 4 wherein said die of said fourth set further includes differing incidia which may be regarded as designating respectively that a shot has been missed and that a shot has been holed out.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to golf games, and more particularly, to golf games having a game board and sets of dice.

Over the years, a variety of so-called "parlor" golf games have been devised. In general, such games include a game board showing the layout of one or more golf holes and a means for generating the yardage obtained on a given shot which means employ some sort of random factor. Typical examples of such games are disclosed in U.S. Patents Nos. 1,513,941 to Smith; 1,520,081 to Purnell; 2,180,049 to Hall; 2,238,079 to Scheib; and 3,355,175 to Carroll et al.

In general, such prior proposals have a number of deficiencies. For example, some require the use of plotting devices to be used in connection with the game board to determine the position of advancement of each player on a hole. Others employ mechanical yardage generating devices which are complicated and bulky. Still others use dice for generating yardage, but suffer the deficiency of providing a limited number of yardage increments obtained by a roll of the dice thereby detracting from the realism of the game as contrasted to the actual game played outdoors and/or require the use of a separate die or set of dice for each individual club to be hypothetically employed in the game. The latter deficiency vastly increases the number of dice required to play the game with the usual number of clubs and often delays the play of the game in that a player requires a particular club and must search through a substantial number of dice to find the die or dice needed for the club to be played.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is the principal object of the invention to provide a new and improved golf game of the type employing a game board and a means for generating yardage information including a random factor.

More particularly, it is an object of the invention to provide such a game wherein dice are used to generate yardage and other information relative to each shot to be played and which are interrelated so as to provide a large variety of club selections while maximizing the chance factor and yet allow the game to be played rapidly.

The exemplary embodiment of the invention achieves the foregoing object in a construction including a game board having designations of a green, a tee, a fairway and a rough adjacent the fairway on both sides thereof. The game board further includes yardage markings progressing at least from the tee to the green in the rough and fairway designations and various areas in both the rough and the fairway designations include penalty and/or bonus designations.

The game further includes a plurality of dice in at least four sets. Means are provided so that the dice of each set are readily distinguishable from the dice of each other set.

Two sets of the dice bear numerical indicia with the number of dice in one set and the numerical indicia thereon being such that a maximum total of the numerical indicia on that set is greater than the maximum total of the numerical indicia on the second set of dice.

In the exemplary embodiment, the third and fourth sets of dice each consist of a single die. The die of the third set includes designations as to whether a putt was sunk or missed while the die of the fourth set includes direction information indicating whether the shot was straight, hooked, or sliced. If desired, the die of the fourth set may also include information that the ball was missed entirely and/or that the ball was sunk from off the green provided certain other conditions of the rules of the game are met.

According to the preferred embodiment, the dice of the first three sets are six-sided while the die of the fourth set has a number of sides in excess of six, some of which are larger than others. The sides opposite the larger sides on the die of the fourth set are provided with unfavorable direction information thus increasing the probability of an indication of a misdirected shot.

The game also includes a table listing the various clubs and the particular number of the dice of each set to be thrown to make a shot corresponding to that normally achieved with the club.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a game board made according to the invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates the four sets of dice used in the exemplary embodiment of the golf game; and

FIG. 3 illustrates a table member referred to in playing the game.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

An exemplary embodiment of a game board made according to the invention is illustrated in FIG. 1 and is generally designated 10. At the side edges thereof, there is a pair of columns 12 containing numerical indicia indicative of yardage. While, as shown in FIG. 1, the increments are ten yard increments, this is done only to aid illustration of the invention. It is preferred that the increments be five yard increments.

Extending between the columns 12 are a series of lines 14 which serve as yardage lines corresponding to the numbers in the associated columns 12. Between the columns 12 is a pair of lines 16 serving to designate the area therebetween as the fairway. The remaining area on the game board between the lines 16 and the adjacent columns 12 is designated 20 and is a representation of the rough.

At the lower end of the game board, a tee point 22 is designated, while near the upper end of the game board 10 is a circle 24 designating the green. At the exact center of the circle 24 is a point designation 26, designating the cup. As seen in FIG. 1, the cup 26 is at the 390 yard mark, thus providing a 390 yard hole.

A variety of bonus and penalty areas may be provided on the game board. For example, an area 28 behind the green extending between the columns 12 may bear the designation "LOST BALL--ADD ONE STROKE". A second area 30 behind the green may be stippled or colored the color of sand, extend between the columns 12 and include the designation "SAND--ADD 20 YARDS". An area 32 just off of the tee point 22 and located between the lines 16 may bear the designation "SAND--20 YARD PENALTY". Other designations may be located solely in the rough to either side of the fairway. For example, an area 34 may bear the designation "WOODS--30 YARD PENALTY" and, if desired, may show representations 36 of trees. Other designations within the rough area may include one such as in an area 38 connoting a ten-yard penalty.

Water hazards, either in the rough or in the fairway, or both, are indicated in areas 40 and 42 and may require the addition of a stroke as opposed to a yardage penalty.

In terms of bonuses, the game board may be provided with an area 44 lying solely in the fairway indicating a favorable wind resulting in an additional five yards on the next stroke. Similar designations may be provided as in an area 46 extending into the rough as well as the fairway.

Of course, unfavorable wind conditions can also be employed. For example, an area 48 extending through the rough and the fairway indicates an unfavorable wind condition so that ten yards should be subtracted from the next stroke.

A variety of other designations, in terms of both penalties and bonuses, may be employed and are generally as indicated in FIG. 1. The precise location of all such areas is preferably appropriate to an actual golf hole on an outdoor course to increase the realism of the game.

Turning now to FIG. 2, four sets of dice that may be employed in connection with the game are illustrated. A first set of the dice includes four dice 60. As illustrated, the same are blue in color so as to enable dice of the first set to be readily distinguishable from the dice of the remaining sets. The dice 60 of the first set all bear numerical indicia 62 as will be described in greater detail hereinafter.

A second set of dice is made up of three dice 64 which are yellow in color. The dice 64 of the second set also bear numerical indicia 66 to be described in greater detail hereinafter.

The third set of dice consists of a single die 68. The die 68 is green in color, again to enable it to be readily distinguishable from the dice of the other sets. The die 68 bears a first type of indicia 70 in the form of an X and a second type of indicia 72 in the form of an O. The purpose of such designations will be described in greater detail hereinafter.

The fourth set of dice consists of a single die 74. Preferably, the same is red in color, again to allow it to be readily distinguished from the dice of the remaining sets. While the dice 60, 64 and 68 of the first three sets are preferably six-sided, the die 74 has a number of sides in excess of six. According to the exemplary embodiment, the same has fourteen sides, including six four-cornered sides 76 (not all of which are shown) and eight three-cornered sides 78 (again, not all of which are shown). Various types of indicia are on the various sides and, in some instances, certain sides are blank.

Each of the dice of the first set, according to the preferred embodiment, on the six sides thereof, include the numerical designations 50, 40, 30, 20, 10 and a blank side. Each of the disc 64 in the second set have the following numerical designations 35, 30, 25, 15, 5 and a blank side.

The single die 68 of the third set on its six sides includes four of the X designations 70 and two of the O designations 72.

The die 72 has indicia including X's, H's, blanks, S's, O's. The sides opposite the larger six four-cornered sides 76 include one X designation, one blank designation, two H designations and two S designations. The eight smaller three-cornered sides 78 include seven blank sides and one side designated with a O.

The interrelationship between the various dice of the first two sets is as follows. The number of dice in the first set and the numerical indicia thereon are arranged with respect to the number of dice in the second set and the numerical indicia thereon so that the maximum total of the indicia showing after a roll of the dice of the first set will be greater than the maximum total of the indicia showing after a roll of the dice of the second set.

In the case of the die 68 of the third set, the X's are to designate missed putts while the O's designate that a putt has been sunk.

In the case of the indicia on the die 74 of the fourth set, a blank showing means that the ball was hit straight without penalty. An H indicates that the ball was hooked, while an S indicates that the ball was sliced. An X means that the ball was missed, while an O means that the ball was sunk if certain other conditions are met.

The game also includes a table designating clubs, the maximum yardage attainable with each club, and the number of dice from each set that must be rolled when playing that particular club. The table is illustrated in FIG. 3 as an indicia bearing member, the indicia upon which reads as follows:

WOODS: DRIVER (305 yds.) 8 dice -- Must use 4 Blue, 3 Yellow and Red. BRASSIE, (270 yds.) 7 dice -- Must use 4 Blue, No. 2 WOOD 2 Yellow and Red. SPOON (235 yds.) 6 dice -- Must use 4 Blue, No. 3 WOOD 1 Yellow and Red. IRONS: No. 1 IRON (200 yds.) 5 dice -- Must use 4 Blue and Red. No. 2 IRON (150 yds.) 4 dice -- Must use 3 Blue and Red. No. 5 IRON (105 yds.) 4 dice -- Must use 3 Yellow and Red. No. 9 IRON (70 yds.) 3 dice -- Must use 2 Yellow and Red. WEDGE (35 yds.) 2 dice -- Must use 1 Yellow and Red. PUTTER 1 dice -- Must use Green only.

With the foregoing structure comprising the game in mind, the same is played as follows. Each hole to be played (there may be several on one or more game boards, the particular hole shown in FIG. 1 being exemplary), is played starting at the tee point 22. The player determines the yardage he would like to cover with a given shot and using the above table, selects a club, i.e., selects the requisite numbers and types of dice from the first two sets. The selected dice are then thrown and the total of the numerical indicia showing on all dice so thrown is added. The resulting total is the distance the shot would have traveled. At all times when dice from the first and second set are being used, the die 74 of the fourth set is also used. The showing on the die 74 of the fourth set indicates whether the ball has been hit straight in the case that a blank is showing; that the ball has been hooked in the event an H is showing; indicates that the ball has been sliced if an S is showing; indicates that the ball has been missed if an X is showing; and indicates that the ball may have been sunk if an O is showing.

In the event an H is showing, the player moves an appropriate marker out on the game board from the point of origin of the shot, initially the tee point 22, the number of yards showing on the dice of the first two sets and into the left-hand rough area 20. If, for example, a 260 yard total were showing, this would result in the player's shot terminating in an area 100, bearing the legend "OUT OF BOUNDS--ADD ONE STROKE". The player will then replay the shot including the penalty stroke. In the event the point of termination would have been in any one of the areas such as the area 34, the marker is moved to that point and the directions printed in the area followed.

In the event the die 74 has an S designation showing, the procedure would have been the same except that the piece would have been moved up to the right-hand rough area 20.

In either event, after the penalty or the bonus designated at the area of the point of termination has been taken, or in the event that there is no designation of a penalty or a bonus, the piece is then moved into the fairway preceding the next shot.

In the event a blank side is showing on the die 74, the player's piece would be moved up the fairway designated by the area between the two lines 16 the distance showing on the dice of the first two sets. In the event a bonus or penalty area underlies the point of termination, the directions in that area are followed.

In the event the X designation, indicating that the ball was missed, is showing on the die 74, the yardage total on the first two sets of dice is disregarded, the player adds a stroke to his score, and repeats the process.

In the event an O designation is showing on the die 74, the player may have holed out his shot. However, this will only be true if the club selected was capable of negotiating the distance from the point of origin of the shot to the green.

If desired, a bonus may be included in the rules to be applied to a player when an O designation is showing on the die 74 and the player did not use a club capable of negotiating the distance between the point of origin and the green. For example, if the distance to the green was over 305 yards (the maximum distance attainable with any of the clubs as designated in the Table) or if an improper club was used, the golfer may be awarded the maximum distance of which the club he used was capable as set forth in the Table and disregard any penalty designated by the area underlying the point of termination.

The foregoing procedure is repeated until the player attains the green. Once the player attains the green, the dice of the first two sets as well as the die of the fourth set are no longer used. Rather, the die 68 of the third set is rolled. Should an X designation be showing, it means that a putt was missed. On the other hand, should an O designation be showing on the die 68, the putt has been sunk. The die 68 is rolled until such time as an O designation is obtained.

The player's score for the hole thus played is equal to the number of rolls of the dice required to hole out the ball plus any penalty strokes that might be added as indicated in the areas underlying points of termination.

In general, the game may be played in the same manner as a regular game on an outdoor course with auxiliary games such as the well-known "Bingo, Bango, Bungo". Of course, as generally alluded to previously, the game board 10 may bear designations of eighteen holes, or any lesser number that may be desired. Where multiple holes are used, each will have a different layout that may be constructed generally according to the principles shown herein.

In addition, other types of penalties or bonuses may be employed. For example, areas in the rough or fairway may be designated as hills having an upslope or downslope. In such cases, if a point of termination is on the upslope of the hill, any desired yardage penalty may be applied. On the other hand, where the point of termination is on the downslope of a hill, a bonus of additional yardage may be applied.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that the invention provides an extremely versatile golf game having a high degree of realism, while maximizing chance. In addition, the same is easy to play by reason of the provision of only two sets of yardage indicating dice through the designations of the table of the number of dice from each of the two sets to be used to simulate a given slot. Moreover, the unique relationship between the number of dice in the first and second sets and their indicia permits use of a relatively large variety of clubs while not complicating the game with a large number of dice, each individual to a particular club .