Title:
AUTOMATIC ELECTRONIC GAMING MACHINE OF THE ROULETTE TYPE
United States Patent 3819186


Abstract:
An electronic automatic roulette game having a simulated number cup and a simulated revolving ball. A game board includes a plurality of numbers corresponding to the numbers on the cup and further subdivided into various color fields and high and low number groups any of which a player can bet a stake on. The cup includes a plurality of lights which are energized in succession under control of an oscillator to simulate the revolving ball, each light corresponding to one of the colored numbers. A counting unit and stake bet computer circuit automatically ascertain when the amount of the stake selected by the player to be bet has been fully paid by the player and cooperate to bring the oscillator to rest, thus stopping rotation of the simulated ball. A win determining circuit compares the number, color, or high and low numbers selected by the player to the colored number position of the simulated ball to determine any correspondence which correspondence controls the pay out.



Inventors:
HINTERSTOCKER A
Application Number:
05/260364
Publication Date:
06/25/1974
Filing Date:
06/07/1972
Assignee:
WACHTLER G,DT
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/237, 273/274, 463/26
International Classes:
G07F17/34; (IPC1-7): A63F5/00
Field of Search:
273/138A,139,142A,142B,137A,136A,135A,135B,13AB,131A,134A
View Patent Images:



Foreign References:
GB798879A
Primary Examiner:
Oechsle, Anton O.
Assistant Examiner:
Kramer, Arnold W.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Greigg, Edwin E.
Claims:
That which is claimed is

1. An electronic automatic gaming machine of the roulette type comprising a game board in which a winning number of a number field made up of a plurality of differing numbers can be illuminated by a simulated rotating ball with the odd numbers having one coloration and the even numbers another coloration, said board including numbers corresponding to the numbers of the number field and subdivided into high and low number groups and color fields for player selection of a number, color field or a high or low number group, a number cup unit including a number of illuminatable lamps making up said number field and means for successively illuminating said lamps in response to the normally occurring output of a frequency controlled oscillator so as to simulate the rotating ball, setting means operable by a player for selecting a stake to be bet on a single number, a color, or high and low numbers, or combinations thereof, a counting unit arranged to receive disk payments made by the player depending on his selected bets, a stake computer circuit coupled to said setting means and said counting unit and being arranged to deliver to said number cup unit a paid-up signal when the disk payments paid by the player match the stake selected, said signal causing the frequency controlled oscillator to reduce its oscillator frequency to zero whereby the number field corresponding to the winning number remains illuminated.

2. A gaming machine as set forth in claim 1 further including win determining circuit means coupled to said number cup unit and said setting means for determining coincidence between the winning number and any previously operated setting means.

3. A gaming machine as set forth in claim 2 further including resetting means operable by the player before the initiation of a playing cycle for resetting the circuits of the machine to the respective standby playing condition in which the oscillator operates at its normally occurring frequency above the perception limit of human vision so as to prevent a player from following the simulated rotation of the illuminated number field.

4. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 3, wherein said win determination circuit means coupled to said number cup unit and said setting means for determining coincidence delivers a winning signal to a winning signal line in case of coincidence.

5. An automatic gaming machine as set forth in claim 2 including pay-out means coupled to the win determining circuit means and including a disk store and a disk pay-out means, a shift register and a switching network for interrogating the win determining circuit means and for controlling the disk pay-out means.

6. An automatic gaming machine as set forth in claim 5 wherein the pay-out means includes a pay-out device for the selected number and a pay-out device for the selected high or low number group prize, said devices being alternately operable.

7. An automatic gaming machine as set forth in claim 1 including means for controlling the frequency of the oscillator such that the initial oscillation frequency of the oscillator lies above the perception limit of human vision, and upon appearance of said pay signal the oscillation frequency falls abruptly to a lower value within the perception region of human vision and thereafter falls to zero within the course of a predetermined time interval.

8. An automatic gaming machine as set forth in claim 1 wherein said means for successively illuminating said lamps includes a switching device containing a multistage shift register whose shift pulse input is coupled with th output of the oscillator and means for coupling a logic member to the input of the first stage of the shift register, which logic member delivers, for one shift pulse, a binary 1 to the first stage, the first to the last-but-one stage of the shift register store in each case initially being zero "0."

9. An automatic gaming machine as set forth in claim 1, wherein the stake computing circuit includes stake units corresponding to varying amounts and contains for each stake unit a forwardly and backwardly operating counter which has a forward counting input and a reverse counting input, a key circuit, one of the inputs being coupled to the key circuit appertaining to the respective stake, the other input being coupled to the counting unit.

10. An electronic automatic gaming machine of the roulette type comprising a game board in which a winning number of an illuminatable number field made up of a plurality of differing numbers can be illuminated by a simulated ball with the odd numbers having one coloration and the even numbers another coloration, and fields for betting upon a number, a color or a group of high or low numbers, the illuminated number field including a frequency controlled oscillator, a switching device connected to receive the output from said oscillator and adapted to be controlled by the oscillations of the oscillator and a number of lamps connected to said switching device and switchable in succession by the switching device in synchronism with the oscillator so as to illuminate the number field in simulation of a rotating ball, player operated setting unit means for selecting a stake to be bet on a number, a color, or a high or low number group, a counting unit arranged to receive disk payments made by the player depending upon the stake of his selected bets, a stake computer circuit coupled with the setting unit and the counting unit and being arranged initially to sum the appertaining stake chosen by the player and subtract therefrom the disk payments offered by the player and deliver to said frequency controlled oscillator a pay signal when the stake has been fully paid, said pay signal causing the frequency controlled oscillator to reduce its oscillator frequency to zero within a predetermined time duration whereby the number corresponding to the winning number remains illuminated.

11. A gaming machine as set forth in claim 10 including win determining circuit means coupled to said number field and the setting unit for determining coincidence between the winning number and any previously operated setting unit and pay-out means coupled to the win determining circuit means, said pay-out unit containing a disk store and disk pay-out means.

12. A gaming machine as set forth in claim 11 further including resetting means operable by the player before the beginning of a new playing cycle, said resetting means being arranged upon operation to reset all circuits to the respective standby playing condition in which the oscillator oscillates at a frequency above the perception limit of human vision.

13. An electronic automatic gaming machine of the roulette type comprising a game board in which a winning number of a number field made up of a plurality of numbers can be illuminated by a simulated rotating ball, said board including a variety of numbers which are subdivided into various number groups, an number fields for setting up a number or a group of numbers adapted to be selected by a player, a simulated number cup unit having a frequency controllable oscillator, a frequency control device for controlling the oscillation frequency, a switching device controlled by the oscillations of the oscillator and a number of lamps switchable in succession by the switching device in synchronism with the oscillator so as to simulate the rotating ball in the simulated number cup, said lamps representing the illuminatable number field bearing the numbers of the number cup, a setting unit including a number of setting keys which represent the fields for placing a stake or bet, and a key store for each number, each key of a store containing a storage stage settable by the operation of the key, a counting unit arranged to receive disk payments made by the player, a stake computer ciruit coupled with the setting unit and the counting unit and being arranged initially to sum the appertaining stake for each setting key which is operated and also to sum the disk payment offered by the player and to deliver to the number cup unit a pay signal when the stake has been fully paid, said pay signal causing the frequency control device to reduce the oscillator frequency to zero within a predetermined time duration whereby the number corresponding to the winning number remains illuminated.

14. A gaming machine as set forth in claim 13 including a win determining circuit coupled to the number cup unit and the setting unit for determining any disk winnings to be paid upon coincidence of the winning number to the number of any of the operated keys, and a disk pay-out unit coupled to the win determining circuit and containing a disk store and a disk pay-out device.

15. A gaming machine as set forth in claim 14 including a resetting device operable by the player before the beginning of a cycle, said device serving to reset all units to the respective standby playing condition in which the oscillator oscillates ata relatively high frequency above the perception limit of human vision.

16. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 15, wherein the frequency control device is set such that after operation of the resetting device the oscillation frequency of the oscillator lies above the perception limit of human vision, and upon appearance of said pay signal falls abruptly to a lower value in particular within perception region of human vision and thereafter falls to zero within the course of a predetermined time interval.

17. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 14, wherein the switching device includes a multiple stage shift register whose shift pulse input is coupled with the output of the oscillator, a logic member means for coupling to the input of the first stage of the shift register, for one shift pulse, a binary 1 to the first stage, when the first to the last-but one stage of the shift register store in each case is a binary 0.

18. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 17, wherein the win determination circuit contains logic members having a first connection in each case to a stage of the key store and also stages of the shift register, said logic members being arranged after the oscillator is at rest to deliver a winning signal to a winning signal line when the shift register stage, which stores a binary 1 after the oscillator has been brought to rest, is coupled to the respective logic member.

19. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 14, wherein the disk pay-out unit includes a shift register and a switching network for interrogating the winning signal lines and for the control of at least one disk pay-out device.

20. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 19, wherein the disk pay-out unit includes a disk pay-out device for th winning number and a disk pay-out device for the winning number group, said devices being alternately operable.

21. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 20 including an oscillator for controlling the shift register, th disk pay-out devices and the switching network.

22. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 20, wherein the disk pay-out unit includes circuit means for determining and prescribing the time duration available for the paying out operation with the duration of time proscribed being associated with the respective pay-out device.

23. An automatic gaming machine according to claim 13, wherein the stake computing circuit contains for each stake unit a forwardly and backwardly operating counter which has a forward counting input and a reverse counting input, the one of which inputs is coupled to the setting key circuit appertaining to the respective stake, while the other input is coupled to the counting unit.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The conventional automatic gaming machines, such as are found in amusement halls, guest houses and the like, ar comparatively primitive electromechanical devices containing rotatable numbered discs, which can be set in motion by a lever operated by the player. The incentive to play is therefore small. Games of more interest, for example, the particularly well known roulette, require on the other hand the cooperation of a further person.

The basic purpose of the present invention is to provide an electronic automatic gaming machine designed after the manner of roulette, which comprises a numbered cup having a predetermined variety of numbers which are subdivided into groups, from which a prize number can be marked by a ball, and comprising fields for setting to a prize number of a group of numbers.

The invention achieves the object that the player can play roulette or a similar game without the cooperation of a further person.

The invention may be better understood by reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an elevation of the front plate of an automatic electronic gaming machine according to a practical example of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a simplified block schematic diagram of the automatic gaming machine according to FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a somewhat simplified circuit diagram of parts of the automatic gaming machine according to FIG. 2, which comprises a number bowl unit, a setting unit and a prize determination circuit;

FIG. 4 is a simplified block and circuit diagram of the automatic gaming machine according to FIG. 2 comprising a counting unit and a stake computing circuit;

FIG. 5 is a diagram for explaining the mode of operation of an oscillator contained in the number cup unit;

FIG. 6 is a somewhat simplified circuit diagram of a paying out unit.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

Before dealing with the details of the circuit it will be necessary to explain briefly the playing rules according to FIG. 1.

Upon commencing of play, the player first of all depresses a resetting key 20. By this means the various circuit arrangements of the apparatus are reset and the rotation of a ball is imitated by successive illumination of number fields of a number field assembly 22. The number fields of the number field assembly 22 are numbered with the digits 0 to 12 are arranged in the manner shown in FIG. 1. The odd numbers 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 are red and form the number group "RED," the even numbers 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 are black and form the number group "BLACK," the numbers 1 to 6 form the number group "STAKE DUE," and the numbers 7 to 12 form the number group "STAKE AT PLAY."

Underneath the resetting key 20 as viewed in the drawing is a key field 24, which contains for each number and for each number group four keys 26 for setting the respective number or number group. The setting keys for the numbers are represented in FIG. 1 by small dark squares, while the setting keys for the number groups are represented by small light squares. The front plate furthermore contains an entry slot 28 for small disks, such as designated in FIG. 4 as 1 DM and an entry slot 30 for large disks such as designated in FIG. 4 as 5 DM. Below the entry slot 28 there is situated a counting mechanism 32 for disks of that size and below the entry slot 30 there is a counting mechanism 34 for the disks of greater size.

After operating the resetting key 20 the player places his stake by pressing the desired setting keys 26. Setting can therefore be effected, if desired, up to four times upon each number or each number group.

In the practical example shown the stake unit for each number is one small disk, for example, and for each number group is one large disk in each case. The amount which is staked corresponding to the depressed setting keys is indicated by the counting mechanisms 32 and 34.

After the player has set the keys, he pays in the stake by inserting disks of the respective size in the entry slots 28 and 30, respectively. Upon inserting the first disk the setting keys are electronically blocked so that any further setting is not possible. Upon insertion of the disks the counting mechanisms 32 and 34 count backwards so that they show how much is still to be inserted by the player.

As soon as the stake has been fully paid in by the player, the number field assembly 22 carrying the illuminated number fields slows down and finally stops, whereupon the winning number remains illuminated. If the player has been successful then the payout of disks takes place and the automatic gaming machine is then ready for the next operation, which fact is indicated, for example, by lighting up of the resetting key 20. If the player has won nothing, then the automatic gaming machine switches immediately to the stand-by playing condition which will be further explained below. The arrangement is so devised that the automatic gaming machine becomes ready for a new operation as quickly as possible.

More specific details of the preferred embodiment of the invention will, for the sake of simplicity, be further explained with reference to the playing cycle briefly described above.

Upon operating the resetting key 20, a central station 36 shown in FIG. 2 having a similar function to the control mechanism of a computer, delivers a signal to the number cup control unit 38 comprising oscillator 40, frequency control 42 and register 44. Arrival of this signal starts the rotation of the illuminated number field in the number field assembly 22. The number cup control unit 38 comprises for this purpose an oscillator 40, whose oscillation frequency is controllable by a frequency control circuit 42. The oscillator itself controls a switching device, which in the embodiment here shown comprises a shift register 44 and illuminating devices for the individual number fields of the number field assembly 22. The illuminating devices are successively switched and for each number field the illuminating devices may be one or more incandescent lamps 46.

The shift register 44 contains as many stages, for example flip-flops, as there are numbers in the number field assembly 22 (that is to say the number cup). These stages are indicated with the respective numbers 5, 12 3 . . 4. at the foot of FIG. 3 and are coupled together in the conventional manner. The shift pulse input of each stage is connected to the output 41 of the oscillator 40. The output of each stage is, as shown in FIG. 3, coupled in each case to a drive transistor 47, which supplies the respective incandescent lamp 46, if the appertaining stage stores a binary 1.

Upon switching in the automatic gaming machine th condition can occur in which a plurality of stages of th shift register are switched into the condition in which the appertaining lamp illuminates, and for this reason the shift register is not connected as a ring counter, but the input of the first stage (corresponding to the number "5") is connected to the output of a NOR member 45 as shown in FIG. 3.

The inputs of member 45 are directly connected to the output signals of all the stages of the shift register 44 with the exception of the last stage (corresponding to the number "0") while there is also delivered to the said input, through an inverter 49, the preferably rectangular output oscillation of the oscillator 40. Consequently the NOR member 45 delivers an input pulse to the first stage of the shift register only when an oscillator oscillation occurs, and in no stage is there stored a binary 1 with the exception of the last stage.

A time graph of oscillator operation from the instant of depressing the resetting key is shown in FIG. 5. At this instant corresponding to T1 the oscillator begins to oscillate at a comparatively high frequency, for example of the order of magnitude of 5 kHz. The value of 5 kHz is chosen only as an example. The oscillation frequency should in any case be so high that it exceeds the perception and reaction capability of human beings and makes it impossible to follow the rotation of the illuminated number field.

The player now enters his stake by depressing the desired setting key 26. Upon depressing one setting key, an associated switch 48 (FIG. 3) is closed and a key store 50 comprising a flip-flop is set through an AND member 52. By operation of the switch 48 a voltage B is applied to one input of the AND member, which allows the key store 50 to be set through its setting input S. The second input 54 of the AND member 52 receives a release voltage from the central station 36, which voltage is only available if the resetting key 20 is depressed after the last playing operation and is not depressed again. The release voltage vanishes if after the depression of a setting key a disk is inserted.

The described setting circuit 56 of FIG. 3 belongs to the first key of the first number of the number field assembly 22, that is to say to the number 5 and this setting circuit is therefore indicated by the reference 5a. For the remaining three setting keys of the number 5, there are provided corresponding setting circuits 5b, 5c and 5d respectively, which are only schematically shown in FIG. 3.

For the other numbers, for example the numbers 12, 3, and so on which follow upon the number 5, there are provided corresponding setting circuits, which are only schematically represented by the references 12a to 12d and by 3a to 3d, respectively. For the sake of simplicity the remaining setting circuits for the remaining numbers are not shown in the drawing. In respect of the number groups corresponding setting circuits are likewise provided; in FIG. 3 there are only represented the setting circuits for the number group "RED."

When a key store 50 is set by depressing the associated setting key, the signal at its output 58 switches over to a condition corresponding to the set value. The pulse established thereby is delivered through a terminal 60 to the lower denomination counting mechanism 32 (FIG. 4) if the switched over key store belongs to a number. The counting mechanism 32 counts the delivered pulses and accordingly indicates the stake appropriate for the set numbers.

In a corresponding manner, the pulses which are delivered from the key stores belonging to the number groups are delivered through a terminal 62 to the higher denomination counting mechanism, which therefore also indicates the stake due for the set number groups. The terminals 60 and 62 are respectively connected to the forward counting terminals of the reversible counting mechanisms 32 and 34.

After the setting operation the player pays his stake by inserting the proper amount of disks in the proper entry slot 28 and/or 30. The disks are tested by the 1 DM disk tester 64 (FIG. 4) and by the 5 DM disk tester 66 and are identified. For each accepted disk, the disk testers 64 and 66 deliver a corresponding pulse to a reverse counting input 68 and 70 respectively of the counting mechanisms 32 and 34. Thus the counting mechanisms count backward upon entry of the disks until the entire stake has been delivered. When a counting mechanism switches to zero, there will appear at a suitable output line 72, or 74 a signal, which is delivered on the one hand to the disk tester and on the other hand to the central station 36. The disk tester is blocked by this signal so that any further disks which are inserted will be guided into a return channel.

In the central station 36, the signals from the two counting mechanisms are delivered to an AND member 76 (FIG. 4), which delivers an output signal when both counting mechanisms stand at zero, that is to say when the stake which is due has been fully paid. The output signal on the AND member 76 is delivered to the frequency control device 42 in the number cup unit 38, and has the effect of causing the oscillation frequency of the oscillator 40 to reduce to zero from the comparatively high starting value.

The reduction in the frequency of the oscillator 40 takes place preferably as is represented in FIG. 5. In this figure T2 indicates the instant at which the output signal appears at the AND member 76. In order to accelerate the playing cycle as much as possible, the frequency drops abruptly to a comparatively low value immediately after the appearance of the output signal of the AND member 76, this low value being for example at about 50 Hz, and from this point the frequency drops gradually to zero value within a predetermined interval, for example, a few seconds, within which the time instant T3 is reached. The time interval T2-T3 is preferably adjustable. The frequency curve shown in FIG. 5 has the advantage that after payment of the stake, the player can observe the illuminated number field rotating while slowing down and finally coming to rest at the prize number.

It is obvious that the described production of the prize number excludes any possibilities of manipulation and fraud. The time interval T2-T3 can be fixed after adjustment of the automatic gaming machines by the manufacturer or the contractor, but the time interval T1-T2 in which the oscillator oscillates at comparatively high frequency is quite indeterminate, and this is because the time duration between the operation of the resetting key 20 and the output pulse of the disk tester, which produces the output signal of the AND member 76, is not constant because of the relatively indefinite transit time of the disks in the insertion slot of the disk tester. Moreover, the momentary position of the illuminated field cannot be discerned on account of the high oscillation frequency of the oscillator 40 up to the time instant T2.

After the oscillator 40, and with it the rotating illuminated number field, have come to rest and the winning number is stationary, a determination is made by a win determination circuit whether the player has won and if so a prize in the form of disks is eventually paid out.

The determination of the prize is effected by a comparison of the condition of the key store with the condition of the shift register 44 by the aid of AND members. For example, the content of the key store 50 is compared in an AND member 78 (FIG. 3) with the output signal of that stage of the shift register 44 associated with the number "5." To the AND member 78 there is also delivered through a further input 80 a release signal issued by a central station 36. This signal releases the AND member 78 for the prize determination after the oscillator 40 has come to rest. Corresponding AND members are also provided for all the other keys of the number "5," and for the keys of the other numbers and for the keys of the number groups. In order to prevent FIG. 3 from becoming too complicated it shows in detail only the circuit for one key of the number group "RED." This circuit contains an AND member 82 with three inputs, of which the one input is connected to the output of the key store, not shown in the drawing, in the associated setting circuit 84, which corresponds in design to the circuit shown with respect to one key 5a of the number "5." The second input receives, like the input 80 of the AND member 78, the release signal, while the third input is fed with the output signal of an OR member 86. The inputs of OR member 86 are connected with the "RED" numbers 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11. The AND member 82 therefore delivers a prize signal in all cases when a winning number is a "RED" number.

In a similar way there are provided for the "BLACK" numbers an AND member 88 and an OR member 90, whose circuit arrangements are seen in FIG. 3.

Of the prize determining circuits for the low number group "STAKE DUE" and the high number group "STAKE AT PLAY," there are only shown the OR members 92 and 94 respectively, which correspond to the OR member 86 of the prize determining circuit for "RED," and these are each connected to an AND member corresponding to the AND member 82.

The winning signals from the above-described win determination circuit are delivered to the pay-out unit represented in FIG. 6. The pay-out unit is so designed that, after determination of the winning numbers, the automatic gaming machine is made ready for a new playing cycle as quickly as possible.

The win determining circuit described with reference to FIG. 3 delivers a maximum of twelve winning signals and in fact there are a maximum of four winning signals for one winning number upon the lines 96a to 96d. Line 96a is connected to the output of the AND member 78, while the lines 96b to 96d are connected with the outputs of corresponding AND members, not shown in the drawing, in the setting circuits for the other three keys of the number "5." Moreover there are connected to the lines 96a to 96d the corresponding AND members of the setting circuits for the other numbers, because in fact only one number can be the winning number. A further four winning signals can appear upon the line 98a and three further lines 98b to 98d, not shown in FIG. 3, for the number groups "RED" and "BLACK." The remaining four winning signals come from the number groups "STAKE DUE" and "STAKE AT PLAY" upon lines 100a to 100d (these being shown only in FIG. 6).

Because the number groups "STAKE DUE" and "STAKE AT PLAY" are in practical experience set comparatively seldom, the winning signals from these number groups are specially treated.

The winning signals upon the lines 96a to 96d and 98a to 98d are taken through an OR member (FIG. 6) to a monovibrator 104, which delivers an output pulse 106 upon appearance of at least one winning signal upon one of the lines 96 and 98. This output pulse has a duration of four seconds in the practical example here shown, because the paying out of the highest possible prize extends over a maximum of 4 seconds (4x the winning number and 4x the winning number group "RED" or "BLACK").

In a corresponding manner the four lines 100a to 100d carrying the winning signals for the number groups "STAKE DUE" and "STAKE AT PLAY" are connected to the inputs of an OR member 108, whose output is connected to a second monovibrator 110. Upon energization of monovibrator 110 an output pulse 112 having duration of 8 seconds is delivered to OR gate 114. The outputs of the monovibrator 104 are also connected to the other input of OR member 114. The output of the OR member 114 is coupled to a release input of a 1Hz oscillator 116, and to the input of the first stage (1) of a shift register 118. The leading flank of the output pulse from the OR member 114 releases the oscillator 116 so that the latter oscillates with the frequency of 1Hz for the duration of the output pulse from the OR member 114, and at the same time the leading flank of the output pulse from the OR member 114 writes a binary 1 in the first stage (1) of the shift register 118. The rectangular output oscillation of the oscillator 116 is delivered to the shift inputs of the stages of the shift register 118 as well as to a number of winnings pay-out AND members 118a to 118d, and 120, and further AND members, not shown in the drawing, and this output is furthermore delivered through an inverter 122 into AND members 122a, 122b and two further corresponding AND members not shown in the drawing. A further input of each AND member 118a to 118d is connected in each case to one of the lines 96a to 96d, while a third input of each of these AND members 118a to 118 d is connected to the output of one of the stages (1) to (4) of the shift register 118. The AND members 118a to 118d, when receiving a pulse from the oscillator 116, therefore deliver an output signal to a line 124, if a winning signal appears upon the corresponding line 96 and if an inscribed binary 1 is situated in the associated stage of the shift register 118. The line 124 is connected through an amplifier 126 to a pay-out magnet 128. Each ti e that the magnet is impulsed it pays out the winnings for a stake upon one number, for example twelve small disks.

The second and third inputs of the AND members 122a and 122b are connected to corresponding lines 98 and to the outputs of stages (1) and (2) of the shift register 118. The outputs of the AND members 122a and 122b are connected to a line 130, which is coupled through an amplifier 132 to a pay-out magnet 134, which upon each attraction impulse delivers the prize for a stake upon the number groups "RED" and "BLACK," for example two large disks.

To the line 130 there are also connected at the output of the AND member 120 and the three further corresponding AND members for the number groups "STAKE DUE" and "STAKE AT PLAY." To one input of all these AND members 120 etc, there is applied again the 1Hz pulses from the output of the oscillator 116, and the second input is connected in each case to one of th lines 100a to 100d, while the third input is connected in each case to the output of one of the stages (5) to (8) of the shift register 118.

For the purpose of explaining the mode of operation of the pay-out unit according to FIG. 6, it will first of all be assumed that the player has won both with four numbered keys and also with four keys for the number groups "RED" or "BLACK," but not in one of the number groups "STAKE DUE" or "STAKE AT PLAY." In such a case winning signals will then appear upon all the lines 96 and 98 but not upon the lines 100. At the output of the OR member 114 there will then appear an output pulse of four seconds duration, which then causes the oscillator 116 to deliver the pulse train 136 of four seconds duration shown at the foot of FIG. 6. During the first of these pulses the pay-out magnet 128 then attracts and throws out the prize for the first number key. In the following pulse pause the AND member 122a then delivers an output signal, so that the pay-out magnet 134 attracts and pays out the prize for the first number group key. This alternate ejection of small and large disks repeats itself during the remaining three periods of the rectangular oscillation 136. The operation of paying out is thereby effected in the shortest possible time and moreover the part of the network for the energy supply to the pay-out magnets 128 and 134 is uniformly loaded.

If the player has succeeded in winning with at least one stake for the number group "STAKE DUE" and "STAKE AT PLAY," the output pulse from the OR member 114 has a duration of eight seconds and in that case the ONE which is written into the stage (1) then traverses all the eight stages of the shift register 118. During the second half of this time lasting for four seconds the winnings are paid out for these numbered groups.

In the described circuit the fact is intentionally taken into account that the paying out operation when a win takes place in the numbered groups "STAKE DUE" and "STAKE AT PLAY" can, under the circumstances existing, take longer than is absolutely necessary. This disadvantage is however more than compensated for by the simple design of the pay-out circuit according to FIG. 6.

The end of the paying out operation is indicated by the trailing flank of the output pulse of the OR member 114 and is announced at the central station 36. The central station then releases the automatic gaming machine for the next cycle and, for example, allows the resetting key 20 to be illuminated. If the player has not had a win, then the apparatus switches immediately to the playing stand-by condition. For example, this can be brought into effect by a NOR member 140 (FIG. 6), which has 13 inputs, of which the first twelve are in each case connected to one of the winning signal lines 96, 98 and 100, while the thirteenth input is coupled to the beat pulse line 80 at the central station 36. The output of the NOR member 140 delivers to the central station 36 a pulse if a win does not take place. This pulse, like the trailing flank of the output pulse of the OR member 114, switches the apparatus to the stand-by condition for playing.

Upon operating the resetting key at the beginning of the next playing circle a resetting pulse is produced which resets all stages of the automatic gaming machine into the initial condition. The circuit arrangement for producing this resetting pulse is not represented in detail because such circuit arrangement details are generally known in computer technology and can be readily produced by persons skilled in the art.

In order to avoid fraudulent manipulation when setting the machine and in order to prevent faulty functioning of the automatic gaming machine, the resetting key 20 and the setting keys 26 are interlocked against each other. The setting keys 26 (corresponding to switch 48, FIG. 3) are only effective after the resetting key 20 has been operated and the central station delivers a corresponding release signal to the second output 54 of the AND member 52. As a further safety measure the resetting key 20 is also capable of being electrically interlocked with respect to the settting keys. This is effected by means of an AND member 138 (FIG. 2), whose one input is connected to the switch operated by the setting key, while the other input is connected through a line 142 to the setting unit (FIG. 3). So long as a setting key is depressed and thereby the switch 48 is closed, there will appear upon the line 142 (FIG. 3) a signal of such polarity that the AND member 138 (FIG. 2) is blocked. The resetting key 20 is therefore only unlocked when none of the setting keys is depressed.

The counting unit 144 with the insertion slot 28 and 30 and the disk testers 64 and 66 may be associated with a disk magazine 146 (FIG. 2), which takes up the inserted disks and stores them in such a manner that they can be delivered again as a prize by the pay-out unit 142 (which contains the paying out magnets 128 and 134 (FIG. 6).

Finally it may be mentioned that the presently described automatic gaming machine can also be designed for operation with markers, counters, tokens and the like. The above-mentioned related expressions "small disks" and "large disks" and the like are therefore to be regarded only as examples and to be interpreted in the widest sense. The so-called "small disks" and "large disks" have been mentioned by way of example. In practice it is only necessary that the disks of one type differ from disks of a second type in some characteristic which can be sensed by th machine.