Title:
FORM FITTING COAT CONSTRUCTION
United States Patent 3812540


Abstract:
An improved form fitting coat construction is herein described having two front panels with interliners secured to the insides thereof and having sleeves of a unique construction. Each front panel is formed with a single dart extending generally vertically, midway between an apex point and an anatomical side line of the panel. The dart extends downwardly from a point, beneath the level of the armhole, to a side pocket formed in the front panel. Preferably the dart is formed by merely sewing the material, without slashing. The interliner includes a major layer of material having a rear edge which crosses over the single dart at the approximate mid-point thereof. Each sleeve is of a unitary, single piece construction and may include two elongated sections which terminate at a jacket-connecting end with a generally circular sleeve cap extending from the end of one section and a generally circular cutout being formed in the second section adjacent the sleeve cap.



Inventors:
PAGANO R
Application Number:
05/287617
Publication Date:
05/28/1974
Filing Date:
09/11/1972
Assignee:
PAGANO R,US
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/97, 2/125
International Classes:
A41D1/02; A41D27/10; (IPC1-7): A41D1/02; A41D27/10
Field of Search:
2/85,90,93,96,97,106,108,115,125,268,272
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3639914METHOD OF MAKING MACHINE SEWN JACKET AND JACKET CONSTRUCTION1972-02-08Ellman
2650364Underarm sleeve construction1953-09-01Clyne
2583089Garment construction1952-01-22Clyne
2582739Dart for torso-fitting lady's garment1952-01-15Armor
2554151Coat structure and method of making the same1951-05-22Newhouse
2453989Coat1948-11-16Guckert
2121836Wearing apparel1938-06-28Steinberger
1721575Method of making darts or gores in articles of wearing apparel1929-07-23Reichardt
1114569N/A1914-10-20Zuck et al.



Primary Examiner:
Schroeder, Werner H.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Sandoe, Hopgood & Calimafde
Claims:
What I claim is

1. In a form fitting coat construction, including two front panels, full length sleeves, and an interliner secured to the inside of each front panel, the improvement comprising:

2. The improvement according to claim 1, wherein said dart extends vertically upwardly from a side pocket, formed in the front panel, to a point beneath the level of an armhole formed in the panel.

3. In the coat construction, according to claim 1:

4. The improvement according to claim 3, wherein said interliner includes three layers of material; and

5. The improvement according to claim 1, wherein:

6. The improvement according to claim 5, wherein:

7. The improvement according to claim 6, wherein:

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to the construction of coats and jackets and, more specifically, relates to form-fitting coats having a uniquely simplified construction.

Heretofore, it had been believed that form-fitting suit coats, sports jackets, and the like, required: a plurality of darts formed in the front panels of each garment; interliner constructions having a plurality of darts, slits, stitches, slashes, insertions and the like; the two-piece sleeves.

When form-fitting jackets are manufactured in accordance with the prior teachings, there is considerable expense with respect to material, labor and in-process time of manufacturing. To date, it has been considered impractical or even impossible to simplify the construction of form-fitting jackets so as to eliminate many of the steps required by former teachings.

Undoubtedly, it would be advantageous if an improved coat construction were provided which would eliminate many of the steps and devices presently considered necessary for building a form-fitting garment such as a business suit or a sports coat.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an improved form-fitting jacket having a construction which permits the elimination of a substantial number of labor operations and materials which are generally considered necessary in the building of such garments.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a form-fitting coat construction which requires less inventory-in-process time in the building thereof than required in existing constructions for form-fitting coats.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a coat construction which facilitates design control and thereby lowers the cost of producing form-fitting garments with certain desirable design features.

At least some of the above cited objects are achieved by the provision of a coat construction including two front panels, full length sleeves, and an interliner secured to the inside of each front panel. The improvement generally resides in the forming of each front panel with only one dart which is vertically aligned midway between an anatomical side line of the garment and the chest apex point thereof. In another feature of the invention, the interliner is formed with a rear edge which intersects generally through the midpoint of the one dart formed in the front panel. The interliner may include a plurality of flat pieces of material which are formed without darts, slits, and the like. In another feature of the invention, each sleeve is formed of a single integral piece having two generally longitudinal sections. A jacket connecting portion of each section may be formed so that a generally circular sleeve cap extends longitudinally from one section and a generally circular (armhole) cutout is formed in the other section.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

While the invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in a concluding portion of the specification, a preferred embodiment is set forth in the following detailed description which may be best understood when read in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an overview of the face area of an assembled front panel section according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a view of the underside area of a front panel assembly showing one interliner, according to the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a view of the underside area of an assembled front panel which is a modification of the assembly shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an overview of a one-piece, form-fitting, set-in sleeve according to the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is a diagramatic illustration showing how the sleeve according to the present invention, form fits on a human subject.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the drawings, in which like numerals are used to indicate like parts throughout the various views thereof, FIG. 1 shows an overview of the face area of an assembled front panel section, according to the present invention.

Essentially, the front panel comprises a front edge 10, a side edge 12, a lapel tab portion 14 and an armhole cutout 16. A point 22 identifies the position of the overall panel which falls over the chest nipple of a wearer and which will hereinafter be referred to as the "apex point" of the front panel. A side pocket 18 may be provided in the conventional location and may be formed in accordance with prior art teachings.

In accordance with the present invention, a single, and only a single, dart 20 is formed in the front panel to extend generally vertically upwardly from the top of pocket 18. The dart 20 must be vertically aligned approximately midway between an anatomical side line 24 and the apex point 22. The anatomical side line 24 generally comprises a vertical line extending through the approximate center of the armhole 16 of the front panel and falls along the center of the side of a wearer's torso.

The inventor has unexpectedly discovered, that by this critical placement of the dart 20, the front panel is provided with remarkable form-fitting shape so as to exhibit excellent body tracing form. Since the placement of the dart 20 tapers a coat at the most "hollow" or concave portion of a wearer's torso, shaping is developed at the most desirable area of the garment for form-fitting purposes.

Other unexpected results generated by this critical placement will be described, more particularly, in the following paragraphs.

Referring now to FIG. 2, a view of the underside area of a front panel assembly is shown with a unique interliner which has been secured thereto by a heat fusing process. The interliner may be formed of one or a plurality of superimposed layers; one of which, the major interliner 70 is the largest and is the layer directly fused to the front panel. If only a single layer interliner is used, that layer will be the major interliner 70.

FIG. 2 shows a three-layer interliner wherein each layer comprises an integral piece of material having an uninterrupted perimeter and being formed without darts, slashes, kyles, gores, cutouts, or inserted sections. The major layer 70 is fused directly to the inside of the front panel. A second layer 71, which preferably comprises hair cloth, is sandwiched between the layer 70 and a third layer 72.

In constructing the interliner, according to the present invention, all three layers 70, 71 and 72 are positioned as indicated in FIG. 2, and the heat fusing is done in one operation. In the embodiment of the present invention, illustrated in FIG. 2, the second layer 71, may fall 3/4 inch from the shoulder edge of the front panel; whereas, the major layer 70 and the layer 72 are congruent with the shoulder edge of the front panel.

The perimeter of the fused major layer 70 includes a front edge 11 which may be positioned to be approximately 1/4 inch from the edge 10 of the panel. The top edge 13 of the layer 70 may be positioned approximately 1/4 inch from the top of the lapel 14 and may be cut to become co-extensive with the neck, shoulder and armhole of the front panel.

The rear edge of the major layer 70 comprises a concave curve commencing from a point approximately 1 inch forward of the anatomical side line 24 and extending through the center of the panel so as to pass through the approximate midpoint of the dart 20. The curve of the rear edge is indicated at 15. The concave curve 15 may then be somewhat flattened out and continued to a point approximately one-third of the distance between the edges 10 and 12 and 1/4 inch above the bottom edge 17 of the front panel.

FIG. 2 shows the rear edge of the major layer 70 covering the top half of the single dart 20 and the front section of the pocket pouch 61. Although the arrangement and proportions of the various elements comprising the front panel must be arranged generally as shown in FIG. 2, the exact dimensions of the various elements may be varied with respect to the fabric used, the size and type coat.

It will be noted that the single dart 20 is depicted in FIG. 2 by a vertical broken line and a solid line. The solid line represents the dart fold as it lays pressed, facing the center front edge 10 of the front panel, and the broken line indicates the stitch line of the dart. It is preferable that the dart not be cut, but merely folded.

This construction of a front panel assembly eliminates the floating chest piece which is generally considered necessary in prior art garments. Of course, the construction also eliminates the cost of labor and material involved in building the floating chest piece into a garment.

FIG. 3 is a view of the underside area of an assembled front panel which is a modification of the assembly shown in FIG. 2. In FIG. 3 the layers of the interliner 70, 71 and 72 are first superimposed, apart from the panel, and fused together as a solid interliner.

The fused interliner sub-assembly is then sewn to the front panel with approximately a 1/4 inch seam allowance along the armhole, shoulder and neck, up to the lapel bridle line. Thereafter, the sewing continues approximately 6 inches down from the neck, along the bridle lapel fold-break. Numeral 74 indicates the armhole, shoulder and neck stitches and 74a shows the sewing along the bridle lapel fold-break.

Following the interliner operation, baste (machine) stitch 75 is formed vertically down the center of the interliner. The stitch 75 stabilizes the panel assembly for sewing the interliner to the pocket pouch 61. This last mention sewing is indicated by stitches 76. Thereafter, a second machine baste 77 secures the lapel area of the front panel assembly prior to machine padding the interliner to the lapel of the front panel.

When the interliner is assembled and attached to the front panel by sewing, it is preferable to have the major layer 70 extend approximately 1/4 inch beyond the center front edge 10, the lapel top edge 11, and the front neck of the front panel in order to allow tolerance for operator variation in the padding of lapel. Otherwise, the arrangement and the general proportions of the interliner, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, may be the same as those illustrated in FIG. 2.

Referring now to FIG. 4, an overview of an integral, one piece, form-fitting, set-in sleeve 34 is shown as comprising a piece of material which is somewhat symmetrical about a center line 40. The center line 40 divides the piece of material into two sections 44 and 46. At the upper terminal end of the piece of material, as shown in FIG. 4, an edge 42 is formed to define a sleeve top, consisting of a set-in, sleeve cap perimeter 48 and an underarm hole perimeter 49, which defines the underarm cutout 50. The edge 42, defining the sleeve cap 48, joins with edge 36 which comprises an "overarm" convex perimeter and 49 joins with the opposite edge 38 to form the "underarm" convex perimeter. At the opposite end of the piece of material 42, a wrist perimeter 45 comprises a concave curve which intersects with the lower extensions of the edges 36 and 38. Tabs 90 and 92 may be provided for any particular stylized opening for a buttoned sleeve cuff. The details of these tabs are optional, depending upon the style of garment desired.

The general center line 40 is a line of roll "fold line" which extends along the inner arm, extending from the armhole to the wrist, at a point above the thumb joint. When the piece of material, shown in FIG. 4, is sewn with the edges 36 and 38 joined and the edge 42 connected with assembled back and front panels, the finished sleeve hangs with a natural anatomical forward pitch of a wearer's forearm. Accordingly, the sleeve follows the natural contour of a wearer's suspended arm, from the shoulder, through the elbow and to the wrist. Heretofore, such a form-fitting sleeve, comprising a single integral piece of material, was considered to be impractical or impossible.

FIG. 5 indicates the effect achieved by assembling a sleeve according to the present invention.

In order to assemble the shoulder pad and sleeve, of the present invention, a sleeve head pad is sewn to the sleeve cap. The shoulder pad is positioned within the jacket and tacked to the jacket without being connected, in any way, to the coat lining. The sleeve lining is then sewn to the armhole of the jacket lining. Through this construction, the sleeve and shoulder pad assembly may be constructed more quickly and does not require the high degree of skill required of workers using present method. Another advantage in utilizing this construction in that the construction facilitates the "busheling" of the shoulder when a customer desires a change in the dimension or placement of the shoulder pad.

It can thus be seen that an improved form-fitting coat construction has been herein described which facilitates design control and which is far easier to manufacture than existing garment configurations. The inventive coat construction also provides remarkable form-fitting figure tracing and may be built by a person having less skill than required for building existing constructions.

Although the expediency of a single dart has been utilized from time to time in the construction of shirts in "square" or "block" jacket configurations, it has heretofore been considered impractical or even impossible to build a form-fitting suit jacket or sports coat utilizing a single dart. Accordingly, the inventor has unexpectedly found that, by critically placing the dart, a form-fitting garment may be provided.

The discovery of the critical placement of the dart synergistically permits the utilization of a flat interliner construction which may be installed with the expediency of heat fusing, in a manner well known in the art. Additionally, the combined construction of the critically placed single dart and a flat interliner, having a concave edge falling through the approximate midpoint of the dart, facilitates the use of a single piece, set-in sleeve. Heretofore, the use of flat interliners or of a single piece sleeve in form-fitting coats and jackets was also considered to be impractical or impossible.

SCOPE OF THE INVENTION

While what has been described herein is a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it is of course to be understood that various modifications and changes may be made therein without departing from the invention. For example, the construction of the present invention is applicable to top coats, over coats, business suits, sportswear, boys clothing, girls clothing, ladies clothing, etc. Accordingly, it is intended to cover in the following claims all such modifications and changes as may fall within the true spirit and scope of the present invention.