Title:
GLAZIER'S TOOL
United States Patent 3799225


Abstract:
A tool for setting diamond-shaped glazier's points comprising a shank having a flattened working head at one end and a handle at the other, the flattened working head making an angle of about 15° to 46° with the shank end being magnetized, said head being provided with a flat triangular recess whose apex is directed toward the handle, said recess corresponding in thickness and angle approximately to a glazier's point, whereby a point can be seated magnetically in said recess with a portion thereof projecting beyond said head and upon sliding said tool along a glass pane in a frame the point will also slide along said pane and be driven into the frame.



Inventors:
CHENEL A
Application Number:
05/323671
Publication Date:
03/26/1974
Filing Date:
01/15/1973
Assignee:
CHENEL A,US
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04F21/28; (IPC1-7): B25C3/00
Field of Search:
145/46 7
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2505874Attachment for holding brads1950-05-02Avery
2487291N/A1949-11-08Abruzzese
2369021Magnetic glazier's tool1945-02-06Cloney
2076134Glazier's tool1937-04-06Ross
1240473N/A1917-09-18Moffat
0239265N/A1881-03-22
0090668N/A1869-06-01



Primary Examiner:
Whitehead, Harold D.
Assistant Examiner:
Zatarga J. T.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Burgess, Dinklage & Sprung
Claims:
I claim

1. A tool for setting diamond-shaped glazier's points comprising a shank having a flattened working head at one end and a handle at the other, the flattened working head making an angle of about 15° to 45° with the shank and being magnetized, said head being provided with a flat triangular recess whose apex is directed toward the handle, said recess corresponding in thickness and angle aprroximately to a glazier's point, whereby a point can be seated magnetically in said recess with a portion thereof projecting beyond said head and upon sliding said tool along a glass pane in a frame the point will also slide along said pane and be driven into the frame.

2. A tool according to claim 1, wherein the shank is less than about 4 inches long.

3. A tool according to claim 1, wherein the flattened working head makes an angle of about 20° to 30° with the shank.

4. A tool according to claim 3, wherein the shank is less than about 4 inches long.

Description:
The present invention relates to a tool for setting glazier's points.

In replacing a glass pane it was the practice to force triangular steel inserts or points point-first partially into the frame surrounding the pane so that the overhang, i.e., projecting portion of the inserts, held the pane in position. Such points performed quite satisfactorily but there were problems in their placement or setting. This was usually achieved with a screw driver or chisel pushing against the flat edge opposite the apex being driven into the frame. Before the points penetrated sufficiently there was a risk of their falling. Even more important, the chisel or screw driver might slip due to its independence of the point with frequent breakage of the pane. The amount of labor thus required, including that in unsuccessful operations, was excessive.

U.S. Pat. No. 239,265 discloses a tool for magnetically holding the point during setting but, in addition to a complex holder, there is no lateral support for the point and no support in its plane so setting is not certain and the point can be lost.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,369,021 also discloses a magnetic tool which provides somewhat more support for the point but does not permit the point to slide parallel to the glass. Again there is no lateral support.

Recently a tool has been developed to drive points in from a magazine, somewhat in the nature of a snap action staple driving gun. For such purposes the staples are diamond-shaped and well driven but since the frames differ in their resistance to penetration, but the gun force does not, there is minimal control over the extent of insertion of the points. Equally important, the driving force is so violent the gun kicks often break the pane.

It is accordingly an object of the invention to provide a simple tool for setting points reliably, easily and without risk of glass breakage.

These and other objects and advantages are realized in accordance with the present invention pursuant to which there is provided a tool for setting diamond-shaped glazier's points comprising a shank having a flattened working head at one end and a handle at the other, the flattened working head making an angle of about 15° to 45° with the shank being magnetized, said head being provided with a flat triangular recess whose apex is directed toward the handle, said recess corresponding in thickness and angle approximately to a glazier's point, whereby a point can be seated magnetically in said recess with a portion thereof projecting beyond said head and upon sliding said tool along a glass pane in a frame the point will also slide along said pane and be driven into the frame.

Advantageously, the flattened working head makes an angle of about 20° to 30° with the shank, since this has been found to be the best angle for advancing a point on the outside of a window when an operator is located inside with his hand sticking out. The shank desirably is at least about 3 inches long since this, coupled with the angle of inclination, preferably about 20° to 30°, ensures that the operator's knuckles will be out of contact with the glass if desired.

The invention will be further described with reference to the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front view of a tool in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the working end of the tool of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a point which can be placed with the tool; and

FIG. 4 is a side view of the tool and point in the course of setting the point in a frame.

Referring now more particularly to the drawing, in FIG. 1 there is shown a shank 10 connected at its lower end to a handle 12 made of wood, plastic or metal. The upper end of the shank is flared and widened to form a flattened head 14. As seen in FIG. 2, at the forward edge of the face of the head 14 there is a triangular recess 16 whose apex angle and depth respectively correspond to the apex angle and thickness of the steel point 18 shown in FIG. 3. The area of recess 16 approximately equals half the area of point 18.

In FIG. 4 the tool is shown with the point 18 in the recess 16 and with the flattened head 14 and point 18 resting on a glass pane 20, the shank 10 making an angle α with the glass pane. The point 18 seats properly because the head 14 is magnetized and the point 18 will be driven into wooden frame 22 by advancing the tool with the head 14 and point 18 sliding along the pane 20. The upper end of head 14 is flat and its abutment against frame 22 limits the penetration of point 18 into the frame. Thereafter putty can be applied to shield the point.

Even if the point is being set on the outside of a window by an operator inside a room, the magnetization of the head 14, the size and shape of recess 16 and the angle α all cooperate to permit proper setting without risk of glass breakage.

It will be appreciated that the instant specification is set forth by way of illustration and not limitation, and that various modifications and changes may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.