Title:
ADJUSTABLE CARRYING STRAP
United States Patent 3790049


Abstract:
A pair of straps are arranged to form a carrying handle having relatively narrow opposite ends for connection to an article such as a camera. Each strap has a portion frictionally embraced by a loop secured to the other so as to space the straps apart in substantially edge-to-edge relationship so that the handle has a relatively wide intermediate portion. Each strap is slidable through the loop embracing it for adjusting the length of the handle.



Inventors:
BOHANEC A
Application Number:
05/250971
Publication Date:
02/05/1974
Filing Date:
05/08/1972
Assignee:
BOHANEC A,US
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/578, 224/908, 294/145, 294/165
International Classes:
A45C11/38; (IPC1-7): A45C11/38
Field of Search:
224/5N,5P,5S,5V,5BC,5Z,45P,45S,55 150
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2291089Extension key chainJuly 1942Okun



Primary Examiner:
Forlenza, Gerald M.
Assistant Examiner:
Noland, Kenneth
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Christie, Parker & Hale
Claims:
1. An adjustable carrying handle for an article, which comprises:

2. A handle as defined in claim 1 wherein each loop is pivotally secured to

3. A handle as defined in claim 1 for a camera having a pair of eye connectors, and further comprising means at each opposite end of the

4. A handle as defined in claim 1 wherein the portion of the first strap which is frictionally embraced by the second loop has its edge overlying the face of the second strap and the portion of the second strap which is frictionally embraced by the first loop has its edge overlying the face of the second strap, and the portions of the straps spaced in edge-to-edge relationship tend to bow away from each other and further widen the

5. A handle as defined in claim 1 wherein each loop comprises a web piece folded to define a generally horseshoe-shaped configuration and having the tips of the horseshoe secured to the corresponding strap.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

In general, this invention relates to carrying handles for articles such as cameras. In particular, it relates to carrying handles that are adjustable in length.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Double strap handles are known that are adjustable in length. Generally, a longitudinally extending portion of the flat surface of one strap overlies a similar portion of the other. Accordingly, the handles have a uniform width throughout their length.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The handle of this invention includes first and second flexible straps. Each strap has an elongated, flat face bounded by a longitudinal marginal edge and has a portion forming an opposite end of the handle. Preferably, at each end, means are provided to attach the handle to one of the two eye connectors provided as a standard feature on a camera body. The straps are spaced in substantially edge-to-edge relationship along a portion of their length to form an intermediate portion of the handle, the intermediate portion being wider than either opposite end. Accordingly, when the relatively wide intermediate portion is wrapped around a person's neck and a relatively heavy article like a camera attached to the handle hangs in front of his chest, the pressure exerted against his neck is distributed and therefore he is more comfortable. A first loop is secured to the first strap and frictionally embraces the second strap. A second loop is secured to the second strap and frictionally embraces the first strap. Each strap is slidable through the loop embracing it for adjusting the length of the handle.

A feature of the handle resides in the fact that the handle, in use, does not change from a desired length to which it has been adjusted despite the relatively strong pull exerted by the weight of the heavy camera. Preferably, each loop is pivotally movable relative to the strap to which it is attached. In adjusting the handle, a loop is oriented in a first position and the strap which it embraces is pulled in a desired direction. In this first position, an axis defined by the loop is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the portion of the strap to which it is attached. In use, the pull exerted by the camera on each strap tends to pivot each loop away from the first position and a binding effect is produced which eliminates undesired changes in length.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a camera and an adjustable carrying handle for it, the handle embodying the present invention; and

FIG. 2 is a plan view of an intermediate portion of the handle.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A carrying handle 1 embodying this invention is flexible and, in use, assumes a generally downwardly opening U-shape as shown in FIG. 1. The handle includes a pair of flexible straps 5 and 7 each of which, in use, assumes a downwardly opening fish-hook shape with the fish hooks opposing each other. Preferably, each strap is long enough to extend from the back of a person's neck, across his shoulder, down to a position between his waist and chest where, in use, a camera 9 hangs from the handle.

The strap 5 has an elongated flat face 13, a portion of which, in use, overlies the back of a person's neck. An elongated marginal edge 15 bounds the flat face 13 and an opposite flat face 17 of the strap 5. Similarly, the strap 7 has opposite flat faces 18 and 19, each bounded by an elongated marginal edge 21.

A loop 23 secured to the strap 5 adjacent the terminal end of the fish hook frictionally embraces a portion of the strap 7. Preferably, the loop 23 is a web piece folded in a horseshoe-shaped configuration. Preferably, a buckle 25 secures the tips of the horseshoe to the strap 5. In this arrangement, the loop 23 is pivotally movable relative to the strap 5. The loop 23 orients the portion of the strap embraced by it so that the face 18 of that portion is substantially coplanar with the portion of the face 13 to which the loop 23 is secured. However, preferably, these two portions are not exactly coplanar. Instead, the edge 15 has a portion overlaying a portion of the face 18.

Similarly, a loop 27 secured to the strap 7 frictionally embraces a portion of the strap 5.

Preferably, connectors 30 and 31 are secured to straps 5 and 7 at opposite ends of the handle. The connectors serve to attach the handle to the pair of eye connectors 33 and 35 provided as a standard feature on many camera bodies. The connectors 30 and 31 shown in FIG. 1 embody an invention made by me and disclosed and claimed in copending patent application Ser. No. 225,774, filed Feb. 14, 1972, and entitled CAMERA STRAP RETRACTOR, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,707,109. Each connector includes a body 32 and a retaining pin 33 which fits through a hole in the body and the hole of the eye connector and secures the connector to the camera.

FIG. 2 illustrates the intermediate portion of the handle in an aspect wherein the handle is lying flat. As shown, the straps are held in substantially edge-to-edge relationship by virtue of the loops 23 and 27. And, the faces 17 and 19 are substantially coplanar. For this reason, the intermediate portion of the handle is wider than either opposite end. Moreover, the straps tend to bow apart further widening the intermediate portion. This bowing occurs because the portion of edge 15 embraced by loop 27 overlies face 19 and the portion of edge 21 embraced by loop 23 overlies face 13.

Each strap is slidable through the loop embracing it for adjusting the length of the handle. In adjusting the handle, one loop is oriented in a first position and then the strap which it embraces is pulled in a desired direction. Next, the other loop is so oriented and the other strap is pulled in the opposite direction. In this first position, an axis defined by the loop is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the portion of the strap to which it is attached. In use, the pull exerted by the camera on each strap tends to pivot each loop away from the first position and a binding effect is produced which eliminates undesired changes in length.

Preferably, each strap and the web pieces forming the loops are made of materials that facilitate sliding the straps through the loops. For example, leather straps and leather web pieces are satisfactory. However, preferably, both of the straps and the web pieces are made of polymeric material having a plasticizer therein. The plasticizers tend to exude to the surface on a continuous basis and make the surface relatively slippery .