Title:
TICK-TACK-TOE-LIKE LIGHT GAME WITH COLOR CHANGEABLE SQUARES
United States Patent 3778063


Abstract:
There is disclosed an apparatus which may be used to demonstrate the effect of adding and subtracting colors and which may also be used as a tick-tack-toe-like game. The apparatus comprises a frame member having opaque sides, an open top portion and a light source located within the frame member. At least two identical layers are positioned in vertically spaced relation to each other within the frame and above the light source. The layers each comprise a plurality of relatively movable light transmitting elements which have preselected colors. In order to see the effect of changing colors, one need only replace one of the light transmitting elements within the frame with an additional light transmitting element of a different color. In the preferred embodiment, the apparatus makes use of the principle of subtractive color mixing. Each of the individual movable elements is colored in one of the three pigment primary colors; cyan, yellow and magenta. When two primary colors are combined, a secondary color appears; namely, green, blue and red.



Inventors:
STRAND J
Application Number:
05/234284
Publication Date:
12/11/1973
Filing Date:
03/13/1972
Assignee:
STRAND J,US
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/157A, 273/241, 273/271, 273/282.1, 434/102
International Classes:
A63F3/00; A63F9/06; G09B19/00; (IPC1-7): A63F3/00
Field of Search:
273/13AB,13AC,13B,131A,131AB,131D,134A,135A,136A,156,157A 272
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3623729THREE-DIMENSIONAL BOARD GAME APPARATUS1971-11-30Wetherell
3618078ANNUNCIATOR1971-11-02Wittman et al.
3606335N/A1971-09-20Reiner et al.
3591182GOLF GAME AND METHOD OF PLAY1971-07-06Grubler
3588115N/A1971-06-28Nichols
3532342CHECKER-TYPE GAME WITH VARIOUSLY COLORED TRANSPARENT SQUARES AND PLAYING PIECES1970-10-06Simpson et al.
3314167Color analyzing apparatus1967-04-18Allgood
3152805Electrically operated matrix game1964-10-13McGinn
3130972Game board with intersecting channels1964-04-28Schwarzlander
3021140Game apparatus1962-02-13Lushansky, Jr.
2917836Device for demonstrating color mixture1959-12-22Balinkin et al.
2575269War game apparatus1951-11-13Hall
1465160Game1923-08-14DiLuchio



Foreign References:
GB797013A1958-06-25
Primary Examiner:
Oechsle, Anton O.
Assistant Examiner:
Stouffer R. T.
Claims:
What is claimed is

1. A three-dimensional tick-tack-toe-like game apparatus comprising:

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said first layer and said second layer comprise an equal number of squares.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said layers each comprise nine squares arranged in three rows and three columns.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein each of said elements in any row and in any column of one of said layers are of a different preselected color.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said elements in said second layer each comprise the identical color to the element directly beneath it in said first layer.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said preselected colors comprise magenta, yellow and cyan.

7. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said additional elements are selected from the color group consisting of magenta, yellow and cyan.

8. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said elements in said first layer are slidable only in a first direction and said elements in said second layer are slidable only in a second direction perpendicular to said first direction.

9. A three-dimensional tick-tack-toe-like game apparatus comprising:

10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein said preselected colors of said elements in each of said rows comprise magenta, yellow and cyan.

11. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein said additional elements are selected from the color group consisting of magenta, yellow and cyan.

12. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein said elements in said first layer are relatively movable only in a first direction and said elements in said second layer are only movable in a second direction.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to an apparatus for demonstrating certain additive and subtractive color phenomenon. The apparatus may further be used as a tick-tack-toe-like game.

Artists concerned with the development of devices for demonstrating the interaction of several colors have long recognized the need for an apparatus which may be constructed to readily demonstrate subtractive color mixing. When light reaching the eye has been modified by interaction with matter; i.e., light reflected by a surface or light transmitted by a filter, or color transparent element, the subtractive color mixing process is involved. When light has been subjected to more than one interaction with matter before reaching the eye, as, for example, light passing through two or more transparent colored elements, we may speak of such light as a subtractive color mixture.

Heretofore, color demonstration devices were generally complex in structure and relatively expensive to manufacture. Furthermore, such devices could not be used for anything other than demonstrating color mixture. The device of the present invention is extremely simple and inexpensive to manufacture and is suitable for use either as a color mixing apparatus or as a tick-tack-toe-like game.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The general purpose of this invention is to provide an apparatus suitable for demonstrating the principle of subtractive color mixing and is further applicable to be used as a tick-tack-toe-like game. To attain this, the present invention contemplates providing a frame member having opaque sides, an open top portion and a light source located within the frame member. A plurality of individually movable light transmitting elements are arranged to form a first light transmitting layer which is spaced above the light source and connected to the frame member and a second light transmitting layer spaced above the first light transmitting layer and also connected to the frame member. Each of the individually movable light transmitting elements are dyed to a preselected color. In the preferred embodiment, three colors are used; namely, the three pigment primary colors; cyan, yellow and magenta. When the apparatus is viewed from the top, the second layer will appear to be of different colors, depending upon the color of both the first layer and second layer. To change the colors, it is only necessary to change one of the light transmitting elements in either the first layer or the second layer.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for demonstrating the principle of subtractive color mixing.

Another object is to provide an apparatus which may be used either to demonstrate the principle of subtractive color mixing or may be used as a tick-tack-toe-like game.

A further object is the provision of a three-dimensional tick-tack-toe-like game using the principle of subtractive color mixing.

Still another object is to provide a tick-tack-toe-like game which is relatively inexpensive to manufacture and which is aesthetically pleasing.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the invention shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the lines 4--4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of one of the elements shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic view of a color pattern used in the tick-tack-toe-like game.

FIGS. 8-10 are diagrammatic views demonstrating the scoring of the tick-tack-toe-like game.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIG. 1, which illustrates a preferred embodiment of the invention, an apparatus 10 which is suitable for demonstrating the mixing of colors and which may also be used as a tick-tack-toe-like game. The apparatus 10 comprises a frame member 12 having opaque sides 14. The frame member 12 in the preferred embodiment is quadrilateral and more particularly, is square. However, the actual shape of the frame may be modified and need not be quadrilateral nor square.

Referring now to FIGS. 1-4, it can be seen that the frame member 12 includes a base member 16 and an open top portion 18. A light transmitting surface 20 is superposed on top of the frame member 12 so that the entire open top portion 18 is covered. Located within the frame member 12 is a light source 22. The light source 22 may comprise a single bulb or light, such as fluorescent light, or a plurality of bulbs or lights. The light source is connected to a conventional power supply and a conventional switch by the wires 24. However, it will be recognized that the light source 22 may also be energized through the use of a self-contained DC power source such as a battery and if this were done, the battery may be located within the frame member 12 and the wire 24 could be eliminated. A conventional on/off switch would then be provided either on or adjacent to the frame member 12.

The light transmitting surface 20 comprises a plurality of light transmitting layers 26 and 28. In the preferred embodiment, two such layers are shown; however, it will be recognized that any number of layers may be utilized. Each of the light transmitting layers 26 and 28 comprise a track means 30 which is connected to the opaque sides 14 of the frame member 12. The track means 30 is adapted to enable a plurality of light transmitting elements 32 to be mounted thereon. The track means 30 is so arranged as to form a plurality of columns of the light transmitting elements 32. In the preferred embodiment, three columns of light transmitting elements 32 are utilized. However, any number of columns may be used without departing from the spirit of the invention. As can clearly be seen in FIGS. 1 through 3, the light transmitting elements 32 form the light transmitting layers 26 and 28 and they completely cover the open top portion 18 of the frame member 12.

The track means 30 may comprise an open frame or it may alternatively comprise a clear plastic grid over the entire open top portion 18 and having upstanding members which function as guide tracks for the light transmitting elements 32. The light transmitting elements 32 may be manufactured from any transparent material such as plastic. The tiles may then be dyed in a conventional manner. The colors may be arranged on the tile in such a maner as to form a design or geometric pattern as shown in FIG. 6. As will be explained below, the colors used in the design may be changed through the principle of subtractive color mixing. However, for the sake of clarity and conciseness, the invention will be described in terms of light transmitting elements having a single color thereon such as shown in FIG. 5. More particularly, the light transmitting elements 32 will be dyed with one of the three pigment primary colors; cyan (blue-green), yellow and magenta (blue-red).

It is a well known principle that when two pigment primary colors are combined, a secondary color appears. For example, cyan plus yellow will product green; cyan plus magenta will produce blue, and yellow plus magenta will produce red. This principle is known as subtractive color mixing and may be demonstrated through the use of the apparatus 10. To accomplish this, a plurality of light transmitting elements 32 are arranged on the track 30 of the light transmitting layers 26 and 28. The light transmitting elements 32 are arranged in a preselected color pattern. For example, as shown in FIG. 7, three magenta light transmitting elements 32m may be placed along one diagonal of each of the light transmitting layers 26 and 28. Simiarly, three cyan light transmitting elements 32c may be placed in the position shown in FIG. 7 while three yellow light transmitting elements 32y may be used in the remaining positions which are open in the light transmitting layers 26 and 28. It is desirable to insure that the colors of the light transmitting elements 32 are in identical positions in both the light transmitting layer 26 and the light transmitting layer 28 and, thus, when viewed from above, the colors magenta, yellow and cyan will appear in the respective places shown in FIG. 7.

To demonstrate the principle of subtractive color mixing, one need only replace one of the light transmitting elements 32 which are present in the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 with an additional light transmitting element of another color. This substitution of light transmitting elements may occur in either of the two light transmitting layers 26 or 28. For example, one of the magenta light transmitting elements 32m located in the light transmitting layer 26 may be replaced with a yellow light transmitting element 32y. Since magenta and yellow produce red, this square would then appear to be red when viewed from the top. The same result would occur if the magenta light transmitting element were replaced in the light transmitting layer 28 rather than in the light transmitting layer 26. Thus, it can be seen, merely by substituting light transmitting elements throughout the several layers, different colors may be produced and may be viewed from the top of the apparatus 10.

Using the apparatus 10 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a tick-tack-toe game may be produced. To use the apparatus 10 as a game, it is desirable to arrange the light transmitting layers 26 and 28 in such a manner that their tracks 32 are perpendicular to each other. It is further desirable, to provide that the light transmitting elements 32 are slidable in one direction only. For example, referring to FIG. 2, the light transmitting elements 32 in the light transmitting layer 26 may be made to slide to the right while the light transmitting elements 32 in the light transmitting layer 28 may be made to slide towards the reader.

To play the game of three-dimensional tick-tack-toe, and the light transmitting elements in each of the layers 26 and 28 are arranged as shown in FIG. 7. While FIG. 7 shows a design having three columns and three rows, it will be recognized that this may be increased to any number of columns and any number of rows; however, it would be desirable to have an equal number of columns and an equal number of rows. Furthermore, while the game is being described using two light transmitting layers 26 and 28, any number of layers may be utilized, thereby increasing the difficulty and complexity of play of the game and increasing the interest. After the light transmitting elements 32 are arranged as shown in FIG. 7, the source of light 22 may then be energized, thereby illuminating all of the light transmitting elements 32. Since the light transmitting elements 32 which are in the light transmitting layer 28 are identical in color to the respective light transmitting elements 32 directly below in the light transmitting layer 26, the same color appears when viewed from the top. However, if the elements in the upper light transmitting layer 28 differed from the color in the light transmitting element 32 in the lower light transmitting layer 26, mixing would occur and a third color would be formed. In other words, if a yellow element 32y is above a cyan element 32c, the color green would appear in the space occupied by these elements.

To play the game, each player receives three additional light transmitting elements, one of each of the colors magenta, cyan and yellow. Each player then selects one of the secondary colors of blue, green or red as his color and the object of the game is to set up a row of three spaces in the elected secondary color. This row may be horizontal, vertical or diagonal. The establishment of a row would score one point. For example, if the player were to choose the secondary color blue, one point would be scored if the elements in light transmitting layers 26 and 28 could be arranged to produce blue as shown in FIG. 8. If the player were to choose green as his color, two points would be scored if he produced the color shown in FIG. 9 while if a player were to choose red, three points would be scored if he could produce a color shown in FIG. 10.

The sequence of play may proceed in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction. Each player inserts one of his additional light transmitting elements in one of the three tracks of the upper light transmitting layer 28 or the lower light transmitting layer 26. Inserting the additional light transmitting elements 32 will force a light transmitting element 32 out of the opposite end as shown in FIG. 2, thereby enabling a player to always have three additional light transmitting elements in his possession. If, after inserting the additional light transmitting element, a row of a secondary color is formed, the point is scored for the player having that secondary color as explained above. For example, if the green player is inserting the light transmitting element 32 and a row of three red spaces are formed, one point is awarded to the player who has chosen red as his color. In addition, the player who has chosen red then follows the green player, he may insert his tile so that he leaves the red row intact. After his move, the red row is again scored as well as any additional rows which may have been formed. The first player to score a preselected number of points would win the game.

Obviously, many modifications may be made in the sequence of play of the game and furthermore, other colors may be utilized rather than the primary colors. Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings and it should be understood that the foregoing disclosure relates to only a preferred embodiment of the invention and that numerous modifications or alterations may be made therein without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.