Title:
GOLF BALL
United States Patent 3753565


Abstract:
A direction indicator on a golf ball consisting of a triangle the bisecting line of which is on the circumference of an intersecting diametrical plane of the golf ball, the sides of said triangle being concave, curved inwardly of the triangle and each side being of a length equal to about one-fourth of the circumference of said diametrical plane so as to appear as straight sides to a player viewing the golf ball from directly above said triangle; in a modified form the base of the triangle and the bisecting line are utilized.



Inventors:
BAKER M
Application Number:
05/242618
Publication Date:
08/21/1973
Filing Date:
04/10/1972
Assignee:
BAKER M,US
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
40/327, 473/268, 473/378
International Classes:
A63B69/36; (IPC1-7): A63B43/00
Field of Search:
273/183C,232,213,62,199,200 40
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3420529GOLF BALL INCLUDING STANCE DIAGRAM1969-01-07Goranson et al.
1842944Practice golf sphere1932-01-26O'Brien
0676506N/A1901-06-18



Foreign References:
GB189551A
Other References:

Trademark Registration No. 41,996, Feb. 2, 1904..
Primary Examiner:
Marlo, George J.
Claims:
I claim

1. A golf ball provided on its surface with three indicator lines including

2. The golf ball specified in claim 1, and

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

There were many attempts to provide golf balls with directional indicators, from painted thick lines and dots such as in Knight et al., U.S. Pat. No. 676,506 of 1901, to the narrow stripe about a great circle of the golf ball shown in the DeVries U.S. Pat. No. 2,709,595 of 1955.

The primary object of this invention is to provide an indicator of such proportions that the player viewing the golf ball from along the green is enabled to accurately align the golf ball with the flag or with the hole, sometime allowing for fade, and then viewing directly from above the ball, the player is able to align the face of the putter along an indicator line at right angles to the directional line of alignment to the hole, thereby to provide a true direction for stroking the ball toward the hole.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the golf ball as it appears viewed di-rectly from above, showing the face of the putter positioned parallel with the base line of the direction indicator.

FIG. 2 is a side view of the golf ball showing the inwardly curved sides of the indicator triangle.

FIG. 3 is another view of the golf ball showing the relative position of the eye viewing it and the straight side appearance of the triangle to the viewer.

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of a golf ball with a modified form of indicator.

FIG. 5 is another view of the modified form showing the projection lines from the eye looking down on the golf ball.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The golf ball 1 is of the usual regulation size of about 15/8 inch diameter. The direction indicator is preferably a triangle having a base 2 and sides 3. The triangle is preferably isosceles, and the bisector line 4 extending from an apex 5 at right angles to the side forming the base 2 is on the circumference of a diametrical plane intersecting said golf ball.

The base 2 and each side 3 are concave, being curved inwardly of the triangle. Namely the side forming the base 2 is curved toward the apex 5.

The length of the base 2 and sides 3 is about 11/4 inches or 11/2 inches which is about one-fourth of the circumference of a great circle of the golf ball, namely the circle formed by a diametrical plane intersecting said golf ball.

When the golf ball is viewed from above, as shown in FIG. 3, the sides of the triangle of the above described dimension, although curved inwardly on the surface of the golf ball, appear to the eye as straight sides 7.

In the modified form shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the sides 3 of the triangle are omitted and the convex bisecting line 10 is substituted. The bisecting line 10 lies on a diametrical plane of the golf ball at right angles to the convex side of the base 2, so that when viewed from above both appear as straight lines.

The player kneels slightly behind the ball facing the hole and adjusts the position of the ball so that the apex 5 of the triangle or the bisecting line 10 points in the direction of the spot on the green toward which the player wants to stroke the put. On a flat surface the apex 5 or the bisecting line 10 is aligned directly toward the hole. On a sloping surface the apex 5 or the bisecting line 10 is pointed to the right or to the left of the hole according to the slope. From such kneeling position behind the ball the player is able to precisely judge the intended line of travel of the ball and is able to accurately point the apex 5 or the bisecting line 10 in that intended direction. Then the player assumes his putting position and, as he looks at the ball, all the sides of the triangle, or the base 2 and bisecting line 10, appear as straight lines, and the side forming the base 2 is near the back of the ball, nearest to the putter 8 and forms an accurate reference line to which the putter face 9 is then adjusted in accurate parallel relation. Then the player strokes the ball directly toward the apex 5 or the bisecting line 10, keeping the face of the putter parallel with the base 2. This allows the player to concentrate on the ball and aids in good directional putting.