Title:
SYRINGE
United States Patent 3747812


Abstract:
A syringe particularly suited for producing and retaining a vacuum and utilizing the vacuum for drawing material into the syringe. A body with a plunger moving therein between piston in and out positions, and means for locking the plunger in the out position to maintain the vacuum and prevent accidental inward movement of the piston and limit outward movement. A plunger shaft with a shear zone for breaking off the shaft after producing the vacuum. A valve at the inlet and operable between open and closed positions for holding a vacuum and for controlling flow into the syringe. A check valve adjacent the inlet permitting fluid flow from the body.



Inventors:
Karman, Harvey (Playa Del Rey, CA)
Robins, Milton (El Segundo, CA)
Wolf, Leo (Culver City, CA)
Application Number:
05/191512
Publication Date:
07/24/1973
Filing Date:
10/21/1971
Assignee:
MEDICAL CONCEPTS INC,US
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
604/110, 604/220, 604/236
International Classes:
A61B5/15; A61M5/31; A61M5/315; (IPC1-7): B65D83/00
Field of Search:
222/387,375,380,386,548,549,550,400.8,309,320,331,337,357 128
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3339595Apparatus for transferring measured quantities of pulverulent materialSeptember 1967Pechmann
3327904Liquid dispensing devicesJune 1967Goda et al.
2869541Syringe structureJune 1959Helmer et al.
2764981Multiple dosage syringeOctober 1956Helmer et al.
2049851Dispensing deviceSeptember 1936Madan



Primary Examiner:
Reeves, Robert B.
Assistant Examiner:
Rolla, Joseph J.
Claims:
We claim

1. In a syringe for providing a vacuum at an inlet and including a body having a bore communicating with the syringe inlet and a plunger having a piston slidably positioned within said bore for movement by a plunger shaft projecting from a plunger end of said bore opposite said inlet, between a first position with said piston adjacent said inlet and a second position with said piston adjacent said plunger end, the improvement comprising valve means carried on said plunger body between said bore and inlet for controlling fluid flow therebetween, said valve means including:

2. In a syringe for providing a vacuum at an inlet and including a body having a bore communicating with the syringe inlet and a plunger having a piston slidably positioned within said bore for movement by a plunger shaft projecting from a plunger end of said bore opposite said inlet, between a first axial position with said piston adjacent said inlet and a second axial position with said piston adjacent said plunger end,

3. In a syringe for providing a vacuum at an inlet and including a body having a bore communicating with the syringe inlet and a plunger having a piston slidably positioned within said bore for movement by a plunger shaft projecting from a plunger end of said bore opposite said inlet, between a first position with said piston adjacent said inlet and a second position with said piston adjacent said plunger end,

4. A syringe as defined in claim 3 wherein said shaft is of cruciform configuration with two of said column members positioned in opposing interstices between the arms thereof.

5. A syringe as defined in claim 3 wherein said shaft is of cruciform configuration and said column member is of plastic tubing, with two of said column members positioned in opposing interstices between the arms of said shaft, and an o-ring about said shaft and column members remote from said piston.

Description:
This invention relates to syringes and in particular, to a new and improved syringe suitable for producing and retaining a vacuum and subsequently utilizing the vacuum for drawing material into the syringe. The syringe of the invention is intended to be used as a small, simple, inexpensive and portable vacuum source which can be used in any environment and which does not require a motor driven vacuum pump with power supply or the like. A typical syringe incorporating the invention may have a one inch bore with a four and one half inch stroke providing a substantial volume particularly suitable for various medical procedures, but of course the invention is not limited to any particular size of syringe and is readily adapted for larger and smaller units.

Important features of the vacuum syringe include provision for maintenance of the vacuum after producing it, provision for controlled release as desired, and prevention of unintentional release of vacuum or other actuation of the instrument.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved vacuum producing syringe. A further object is to provide such a syringe for producing and retaining a vacuum and incorporating valving for controlled use of the vacuum. An additional object is to provide such a syringe incorporating locking and other safety features. A particular object of the invention is to provide such a syringe which may utilize conventional syringe manufacturing techniques incorporating a few plastic and/or metal parts so as to be inexpensive and suitable for disposal after a single use.

Other objects, advantages, features and results will more fully appear in the course of the following description. The drawings merely show and the description merely describes the preferred embodiments of the present invention which are given by way of illustration or example.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view, partly in section, of a syringe incorporating a presently preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to that of FIG. 1 showing the plunger in the out position;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the syringe of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4--4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a side view, partly in section, of a syringe incorporating an alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a partial view of the syringe of FIG. 5 showing the plunger in the out position;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along the line 7--7 of FIG. 6; and

FIG. 8 is a view of the inlet of a syringe illustrating a pinch type of control valve.

The syringe of FIGS. 1-4 includes a body 10 having a bore 11 and inlet 12, with a valve 13 between the bore and inlet, and a plunger 14 with a piston 15 and shaft 16.

The valve 13 is a rotary or turret valve and may comprise valve members 21, 22 mounted in side-by-side relation by means of a rivet or a screw 23 which is threaded into the member 21, with the member 22 rotating on a shoulder 24 of the screw. In the embodiment illustrated, the valve member 21 is formed integrally with the body 10, typically being a plastic molded part, with a passage 27 in the member 21 communicating with the bore 11. Also, the valve member 22 may be formed integrally with the inlet 12, preferably being another molded plastic part, with a passage 28 in the member 22 communicating with the inlet 12. Another passage 29 may be provided in the member 22 serving as an outlet passage for emptying the syringe. The members 21, 22 may be provided with interengaging notches 30 and projection 31 providing detents for the open, closed and emptying positions of the valve, the valve being shown in the closed position in FIGS. 1 and 2 and in the open position in FIGS. 3 and 4.

A relief valve 34, typically a conventional flapper or duck call check valve, may be provided in the body 10 adjacent the inlet end. A preferred form of the relief valve is shown in FIG. 3, comprising a tube of rubber or other flexible material with a flat, normally closed outer end 35. A slight build up of pressure within the bore 11 over the ambient pressure will open the end 35 and vent the bore, also permitting emptying the syringe. When there is a vacuum within the bore, the external pressure seals the end 35. A similar check valve 37 may be provided within the inlet 12 to block fluid flow from the bore through the inlet.

The piston 15 may be a unit molded of rubber or other flexible material which provides a sliding seal with the inner wall of the body as the plunger is moved. A petroleum jelly or the like may be used to improve the sealing action. The shaft 16 is connected at one end to the piston 15 and at the other end carries a cap 41 for manual grasping. The shaft may be of cruciform cross section between the piston and cap to provide maximum strength with minimum weight, and preferably is a molded plastic part.

Flanges 43 are provided at the upper or plunger end of the body 10, with a clip 44 carried on each of the flanges 43. The clips 44 typically are metal stampings, with turned over edges 45 for gripping the flanges 43, and with portions 46 projecting into the area of the bore to serve as stop brackets. Lips 47 may be provided on the brackets 46 to function as rotational stops and as an aid in the break-off procedure. As can be seen from FIG. 4, the brackets 46 project into the interstices between the arms 47 of the cruciform shaft. Notches 48 are provided in the shaft adjacent the piston 15 for engaging the brackets 46 as will be described. A notch 48 is provided for each bracket 46 and in the embodiment illustrated, the two opposing notches 48 are utilized. Notches 49 may be provided in each of the arms 47, with the notches 49 preferably deeper than the notches 48.

In use, the plunger is pushed in to the position of FIG. 1 and the valve 13 is rotated to the closed position of FIGS. 1 and 2. The plunger is then pulled out to the position of FIG. 2 and is rotated clockwise as viewed from the top of FIG. 2, to move the brackets 46 into the notches 48 (see FIG. 4). In this condition, the plunger is locked in the up or out position and a vacuum is maintained within the body of the syringe. If desired, an additional torque may be applied to the plunger to shear it at the reduced cross sectional area zone 52 formed by the notches 49. This breaking off of the plunger shaft eliminates the projecting shaft and substantially eliminates the possibility of the shaft being rotated to release the vacuum.

The syringe may now be used for drawing a material into the body through the inlet 12 by rotating the valve member 22 to the open or partially open position as desired. The inlet 12 may be given any desired configuration, and any suitable instrument may be mounted thereon. The syringe may be emptied by rotating the valve member 22 to the emptying position. Alternatively, the syringe may be emptied and a new vacuum produced by rotating the member 22 to the closed position and pumping the plunger in and out.

An alternative form of the syringe having a different valve construction and a different stop construction is illustrated in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7, where elements corresponding to those of FIGS. 1-4 are identified by the same reference numerals. The valve 13 comprises a valve body 55 formed in the lower or inlet end of the syringe body, and a valve plug 56 rotatably positioned in the valve body. The valve is shown in the closed position in FIG. 5, and may be manually rotated 90° by a tab 57 to bring a passage 58 of the plug 56 to the vertical position to provide a flow path between the inlet 12 and bore 11.

Two column members 60, typically plastic tubes, are positioned on opposite sides of the shaft of the plunger, and are fixed to the plunger at the upper or cap end by suitable means such as cementing or spring clips or integral molding or the like. An O-ring 59 is used in the embodiment illustrated. The lower or piston ends of the tubes 16 are free and the plunger and tubes are constructed so that the tubes are urged outward, as seen in FIG. 6. Notches 61 may be formed in the lower ends of the tubes 60 for better engagement with the upper end of the body 10 or stop clips 44 (if used).

The syringe is shown ready for use in FIG. 5 with the valve closed and the plunger in the down or in position. The plunger is pulled out of the position of FIG. 6 which permits outward flaring of the members 60, with the lower ends of the members 60 engaging the shoulder formed at the top of the body to prevent inward movement of the plunger. If it is desired to push the plunger in, the members 60 are squeezed inwardly toward the center of the shaft out of engagement with the upper end of the body, permitting inward movement of the plunger.

While the valve 13 has been shown formed integrally with the syringe in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-4 and in the embodiment of FIGS. 5-7, the syringe may be constructed without the valve, and valves as shown in FIGS. 1-4 and FIGS. 5-7 may be coupled to the syringe by appropriate tubing if desired. One alternative utilzing a conventional spring clip type valve is illustrated in FIG. 8, with a short length of flexible tubing 62 fixed on the lower end of the syringe body 10 and with a catheter or other suitable instrument 63 fixed in the other end of the tubing 62. A conventional pinch type spring clamp 64 is positioned on the tubing 62 to serve as a valve.

Although exemplary embodiments of the invention have been disclosed and discussed, it will be understood that other applications of the invention are possible and that the embodiments disclosed may be subjected to various changes, modifications and substitutions without necessarily departing from the spirit of invention.