Title:
SAFETY DEVICE FOR REVOLVERS
United States Patent 3738042


Abstract:
A single action revolver having a rebound hammer, trigger, cylinder, cylinder pawl, cylinder latch and cylinder loading gate is provided with mutually cooperating hammer safety, loading gate safety and manual safety means for preventing premature ignition of a cartridge in the cylinder. The rebound hammer is provided with a safety notch that engages the sear leg of the trigger when the hammer is in its rebound position. The loading gate is mounted for rotation about an axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder, the loading gate having a cam surface that moves the cylinder latch out of engagement with the cylinder and a trigger safety element that prevents significant movement of the trigger and hammer when the hammer is in its rebound position and when the loading gate is rotated to its open position. The manual safety means is mounted for rotation about an axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder, the safety means having a hammer safety element that prevents forward movement of the hammer and a pawl safety element that prevents upward movement of the pawl when the hammer is in its rebound position and the safety means is rotated to its safe position.



Inventors:
Ruger, William B. (Southport, CT)
Larson, Lawrence L. (Bethany, CT)
Application Number:
05/174849
Publication Date:
06/12/1973
Filing Date:
08/25/1971
Assignee:
STURM RUGER & CO,US
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41A17/74; F41C3/14; (IPC1-7): F41C17/04; F41C1/00
Field of Search:
42/66,67,65,59,7F
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3624947N/A1971-12-07Worrall, Sr.



Foreign References:
CH338381A1959-05-15
DE1147871B1963-04-25
Primary Examiner:
Borchelt, Benjamin A.
Assistant Examiner:
Jordan C. T.
Claims:
We claim

1. In a revolver having a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted in the frame, said cylinder being formed with a plurality of cartridge-receiving chambers, a hammer pivotally mounted on the frame, a trigger having a sear releasably engaging the hammer, a pawl for rotating the cylinder when the hammer is being cocked, a pivoted cylinder latch releasably engaging the cylinder to prevent rotation thereof, a movable loading gate disposed immediately behind one of the chambers of the cylinder to permit loading and unloading of said chamber when said gate is in its open position, and hammer safety means comprising a safety notch formed in the hammer adapted to engage the sear of the trigger when the uncocked hammer is positioned a predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position, the improvement in safety means for preventing ignition of a cartridge contained in the uppermost chamber of the cylinder which comprises:

2. The revolver according to claim 1 in which the hammer is a rebound hammer having a hammer spring and rebound hammer spring strut that normally maintain the uncocked hammer in its rebound position an appreciable predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position, said safety notch engaging the sear of the trigger when the hammer is in its rebound position.

3. The revolver according to claim 2 in which the trigger safety element of the loading gate engages the trigger when the hammer is in its rebound position and when the loading gate is in its open position.

4. The revolver according to claim 2 in which the loading gate is pivotally mounted on the frame for rotation about an axis of rotation disposed parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder, the loading gate having a hub portion concentric with the axis of rotation of the loading gate, said hub portion having a cam surface which contacts the pivoted cylinder latch and a trigger safety element adapted to engage the trigger when the hammer is in its rebound position, said cam surface moving the cylinder latch out of engagement with the cylinder and said trigger safety element preventing significant movement of the trigger and hammer when the loading gate is rotated to its open position.

5. The revolver according to claim 2 in which the hammer safety element of the manual safety means engages the hammer when the hammer is in its rebound position and when the manual safety means is rotated to its safe position.

6. The revolver according to claim 1 in which the loading gate is pivotally mounted on the frame for rotation about an axis of rotation disposed parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder, the loading gate having a hub portion concentric with the axis of rotation of the loading gate, said hub portion having a cam surface which contacts the pivoted cylinder latch and a trigger safety element adapted to engage the trigger, said cam surface moving the cylinder latch out of engagement with the cylinder and said trigger safety element preventing significant movement of the trigger and hammer when the uncocked hammer is positioned said predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position and when the loading gate is rotated about its axis of rotation to its open position.

7. The revolver according to claim 6 in which the cam surface has a recessed portion and a protrudent portion, and in which the pivoted cylinder latch has a cam follower portion that is received in said recessed portion when the loading gate is closed and is depressed by said protrudent portion when the loading gate is open.

8. In a revolver having a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted in the frame, said cylinder being formed with a plurality of cartridge-receiving chambers, a hammer pivotally mounted on the frame, a trigger having a sear releasably engaging the hammer, a pawl for rotating the cylinder when the hammer is being cocked, a pivoted cylinder latch releasably engaging the cylinder to prevent rotation thereof, a movable loading gate disposed immediately behind one of the chambers of the cylinder to permit loading and unloading of said chamber when said gate is in its open position, and hammer safety means comprising a safety notch formed in the hammer adapted to engage the sear of the trigger when the uncocked hammer is positioned a predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position, the improvement in safety means for preventing ignition of a cartridge contained in the uppermost chamber of the cylinder which comprises:

9. The revolver according to claim 8 in which the manual safety means is mounted on the frame for rotation about an axis disposed perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder.

10. The revolver according to claim 8 in which the hammer is a rebound hammer having a hammer spring and rebound hammer spring strut that normally maintains the uncocked hammer in its rebound position an appreciable predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position, said safety notch engaging the sear of the trigger when the hammer is in its rebound position.

11. The revolver according to claim 10 in which the hammer safety element of the manual safety means engages the hammer when the hammer is in its rebound position and when the manual safety means is rotated to its safe position.

12. The revolver according to claim 11 in which the manual safety means is mounted on the frame for rotation about an axis disposed perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder.

13. In a revolver having a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted in the frame, said cylinder being formed with a plurality of cartridge-receiving chambers, a hammer pivotally mounted on the frame, a trigger having a sear releasably engaging the hammer, a pawl for rotating the cylinder when the hammer is being cocked, a pivoted cylinder latch releasably engaging the cylinder to prevent rotation thereof, a movable loading gate disposed immediately behind one of the chambers of the cylinder to permit loading and unloading of said chamber when said gate is in its open position, and hammer safety means comprising a safety notch formed in the hammer adapted to engage the sear of the trigger when the uncocked hammer is positioned a predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position, the improvement in safety means for preventing ignition of a cartridge contained in the uppermost chamber of the cylinder which comprises:

14. The revolver according to claim 13 in which the loading gate is pivotally mounted on the frame for rotation about an axis of rotation disposed parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder, the loading gate having a hub portion concentric with the axis of rotation of the loading gate, said hub portion having a cam surface which contacts the pivoted cylinder latch and a trigger safety element adapted to engage the trigger, said cam surface moving the cylinder latch out of engagement with the cylinder and said trigger safety element preventing significant movement of the trigger and hammer when the uncocked hammer is positioned said predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position and when the loading gate is rotated about its axis of rotation to its open position.

15. The revolver according to claim 14 in which the cam surface has a recessed portion and a protrudent portion, and in which the pivoted cylinder latch has a cam follower portion that is received in said recessed portion when the loading gate is closed and is depressed by said protrudent portion when the loading gate is open.

16. The revolver according to claim 13 in which the hammer is a rebound hammer having a hammer spring and rebound hammer spring strut that normally maintain the uncocked hammer in its rebound position an appreciable predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position, said safety notch engaging the sear of the trigger when the hammer is in its rebound position.

17. The revolver according to claim 16 in which the trigger safety element of the loading gate engages the trigger when the hammer is in its rebound position and when the loading gate is in its open position.

18. The revolver according to claim 16 in which the loading gate is pivotally mounted on the frame for rotation about an axis of rotation disposed parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder, the loading gate having a hub portion concentric with the axis of rotation of the loading gate, said hub portion having a cam surface which contacts the pivoted cylinder latch and a trigger safety element adapted to engage the trigger when the hammer is in its rebound position, said cam surface moving the cylinder latch out of engagement with the cylinder and said trigger safety element preventing significant movement of the trigger and hammer when the loading gate is rotated to its open position.

19. The revolver according to claim 18 in which the cam surface has a recessed portion and a protrudent portion, and in which the pivoted cylinder latch has a cam follower portion that is received in said recessed portion when the loading gate is closed and is depressed by said protrudent portion when the loading gate is open.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to revolvers, and more particularly to mutually cooperating safety devices for single action revolvers.

2. Prior Art

Single action revolvers are cocked by rotating the hammer rearwardly until the sear notch of the hammer engages the sear of the trigger. When the trigger is pulled, the sear is disengaged and the hammer springs forward to ignite the cartridge in the uppermost chamber of the cylinder of the revolver. The hammer is usually provided with a safety notch that engages the sear when the hammer is rotated a small distance rearwardly from its cartridge ignition position, and with a loading notch that engages the sear when the hammer rotated about half way to its fully cocked position. The engagement of the sear of the trigger with the safety notch and with the loading notch of the hammer is intended to prevent the hammer from springing forward to its cartridge ignition position, and both the safety notch and the loading notch are usually provided with depending lips or surfaces which are intended to prevent disengagement of the sear even when the trigger is pulled. However, the safety notch and the loading notch of the hammer have always been a source of possible trouble and danger due to failure or breakage of the engaged metal parts if the hammer is stuck (for example, if the revolver is dropped) or if the trigger is pulled so forceably as to disengage the sear from the safety or loading notch. The dangers inherent in any such accidental discharge are enhanced when the revolver is being loaded or unloaded, and particularly when the loading gate of a revolver so equipped is open for this purpose.

Most single action revolvers have cylinders that are rotatably mounted on more or less fixed longitudinal shafts that are secured to the revolver frame, the cylinder being loaded and unloaded by means of a movable loading gate mounted on the frame immediately behind one of the chambers of the cylinder. When the loading gate is open, the cylinder is rotated by hand to bring each chamber into alignment with an opening in the revolver frame which is normally covered by the gate, for loading and unloading purposes. However, free rotation of the cylinder is normally prevented by a cylinder latch that releasably engages one of the latch notches formed in the cylinder, and in order to rotate the cylinder the cylinder latch must be withdrawn from engagement with the notches of the cylinder. Various mechanisms have heretofore been employed to disengage the cylinder latch from the cylinder to permit rotation of the cylinder for loading and unloading thereof. In most commercially available single action revolvers the hammer, trigger and cylinder latch co-act to disengage the cylinder latch when the hammer is moved to its loading position. In another commercially available revolver the loading gate pivots on a shaft that is mounted transversely on the frame, the loading gate acting through an intermediate part to disengage the cylinder latch when the loading gate is swung rearwardly to its open position. In all cases, however, the impingement of the hammer against the uppermost cartridge in the cylinder is prevented only by the engagement of the trigger sear in the loading notch of the hammer, and thus is subject to the dangers of accidental discharge previously discussed.

In order to minimize the likelihood of accidental discharge of the uppermost cartridge in the cylinder, it has heretofore been proposed that the hammer be of the so-called "rebound" type. The trigger spring of a rebound hammer is connected to the hammer by means of a rebound strut which bears against the hammer at two spaced bearing points -- namely, a main bearing point and a rebound bearing point. When the hammer is cocked and then fired the force of the hammer spring is directed against the main bearing point of the hammer which drives the hammer forceably forward against the uppermost cartridge in the cylinder. At this point the force of the hammer spring is directed against the rebound bearing point of the hammer which causes the hammer to rebound or move rearwardly a small distance until the pressure of the hammer spring against the main bearing point and the rebound bearing point is equalized. Although relatively safe in normal use, rebound hammer revolvers are nonetheless liable to be accidentally discharged if the hammer is forceably struck.

After an intensive investigation of the problems involved in the safety of single action revolvers, and in particular the safety of these revolvers during loading and unloading and when in their nominally "safe" position, we have developed mutually cooperating hammer safety, loading gate safety and manual safety means for preventing premature ignition of a cartridge in a chamber of a single action revolver, and especially in revolvers having rebound hammers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The improved safety and loading means of the invention is applicable to single action revolvers of essentially convention design having a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted in the frame, a hammer pivotally mounted on the frame, a trigger having a sear releasably engaging the hammer, a pawl for rotating the cylinder when the hammer is being cocked, a pivoted cylinder latch releasably engaging the cylinder to prevent rotation thereof, a movable loading gate disposed immediately behind one of the chambers of the cylinder to permit loading and unloading of said chamber when said gate is in its open position, and hammer safety means comprising a safety notch formed in the hammer adapted to engage the sear of the trigger when the uncocked hammer is positioned a predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position. Pursuant to the invention, loading gate safety means having a trigger safety element are provided, the trigger safety element engaging the trigger and preventing significant movement of the trigger and hammer when the uncocked hammer is positioned the aforementioned predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position and when the loading gate is in its open position. In addition, manual safety means having a hammer safety element and a pawl safety element are provided, the hammer safety element engaging the hammer to prevent forward movement of the hammer and the pawl safety element engaging the pawl to prevent upward movement of the pawl when the uncocked hammer is positioned the aforementioned predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position and when the safety means is rotated to its safe position.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the loading gate is pivotally mounted on the frame for rotation about an axis of rotation disposed parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder. The loading gate has a hub portion concentric with the axis of rotation of the loading gate, said hub portion having a cam surface which contacts the pivoted cylinder latch and a trigger safety element adapted to engage the trigger. The cam surface moves the cylinder latch out of engagement with the cylinder and the trigger safety element prevents significant movement of the trigger and hammer when the uncocked hammer is positioned the aforesaid predetermined distance rearwardly of its cartridge ignition position and when the loading gate is rotated about its axis of rotation to its open position. In this embodiment the cam surface has a recessed portion and a protrudent portion, and the pivoted cylinder latch has a cam follower portion that is received in the recess portion of the cam surface when the loading gate is closed and is depressed by the protrudent portion of the cam surface when the loading gate is open.

The manual safety means comprises a transverse shaft that is rotatably mounted on the frame with the axis of the shaft disposed perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder. The transverse shaft is provided with a hammer recess portion which is adapted to receive the hammer and with a pawl recess portion that is adapted to receive the pawl when the safety means is rotated to its "fire" position. The non-recessed portions of the shaft comprise the aforementioned hammer safety element and the pawl safety element which block forward movement of the hammer and upward movement of the pawl when the safety means is rotated to its safe position. When the revolver is fitted with a rebound hammer and the hammer is in its rebound position, the safety notch of the hammer engages the sear of the trigger, the trigger safety element of the loading gate engages the trigger when the loading gate is in its open position, and the hammer safety element of the manual safety means engages the hammer when the safety means is rotated to its safe position.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The improvement in safety mechanisms for revolvers of the invention will be better understood from the following description thereof in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary view, partly in section, of the right hand side of a single action revolver embodying the safety mechanisms of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 1 showing the hammer in the process of being cocked;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIGS. 1 and 2 showing the hammer in its fully cocked position;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view along line 4--4 $ of FIG. 1 showing the loading gate closed;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 4 showing the loading gate open;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view along line 6--6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the loading gate;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view showing the relationship of the loading gate, cylinder latch and trigger;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary view, partly in section, of the left hand side of the revolver of FIG. 1 showing the manual safety means;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view along line 10--10 of FIG. 9 showing the relative positions of the hammer, pawl and safety means when the latter is in its safe position;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view along line 11--11 of FIG. 10 showing the relationship of the pawl and the safety means when in its safe position;

FIG. 12 is a sectional view along line 12--12 of FIG. 10 showing the relationship of the hammer and the safety means when in its safe position; and

FIG. 13 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 11 showing the relationship of the pawl and safety means when the latter is in its fire position.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The improved safety mechanism of the invention is particularly suitable for use in conjunction with single action revolvers of the rebound hammer type such as that shown in the drawings, although the safety mechanism may be incorporated in other types of single action revolvers as well. The revolver shown in the drawings comprises, in its major components, a frame 1, a barrel 2, a cylinder 3 rotatably mounted in the frame, a hammer 4 pivotally mounted on the frame, a trigger 5 also pivotally mounted on the frame, a pawl 6 for rotating the cylinder when the hammer is being cocked, and a pivoted cylinder latch 7 releasably engaging the cylinder to prevent rotation thereof when the revolver is fired. The cylinder 3 is formed with a plurality (usually six) of cartridge-receiving chambers 3a and is rotatably mounted on a longitudinal shaft 8 which, in turn, is mounted on the frame. A pivoted loading gate 9 (shown best in FIGS. 4-8) is mounted on the right hand side of the frame 1 immediately behind one of the chambers 3a of the cylinder 3 to permit loading and unloading of the cylinder when the gate 9 has moved to its open position.

As noted, the hammer 4, which is pivotally mounted on the frame 1 by means of the pivot pin 10, is advantageously of the rebound type. The hammer spring (not shown) in the handle portion 11 of the frame 1 is connected to the hammer by means of a hammer strut 12. The hammer strut has two spaced bearing members, the main bearing member 13 and the rebound bearing member 14, which are received in the main bearing point 15 and the rebound bearing point 16, respectively, of the hammer when the hammer is in its rebound position shown in FIG. 1. When in this position the hammer spring bears with equivalent force against the main bearing point 15 and the rebound bearing point 16 of the hammer 4 to maintain the hammer in its rebound position.

The hammer 4 is provided with a safety notch 17, a trigger cam surface 18 and a sear notch 19. The safety notch 17 is engaged by the sear 20 at the upper end of the extension 21 of the trigger 5 when the hammer is in its rebound position as shown in FIG. 1. The trigger cam surface 18 contacts and rotates the trigger extension 21 slightly clockwise when the hammer is being cocked as shown in FIG. 2. The sear notch 19 is engaged by the sear 20 when the hammer is rotated to its fully cocked position as shown in FIG. 3. The cylinder pawl 6 is pivotally mounted on the hammer 4 by means of the pin 22. The pawl 6 moves upwardly and engages the ratchet teeth 23 of the cylinder 3, thereby causing the cylinder to rotate, when the hammer is being cocked as shown in FIG. 2. The revolver is fired by pulling the trigger 5 which moves the sear 20 forwardly out of engagement with the sear notch 19, thereby allowing the hammer 4 to spring forwardly against the spring-loaded firing pin 24 which, in turn, ignites the cartridge (not shown) in the uppermost chamber 3a of the cylinder 3. At this point, the pressure of the hammer spring bears only against the rebound bearing point 16 of the hammer 4 which causes the hammer to spring rearwardly a short distance to its rebound position shown in FIG. 1.

The trigger 5 is pivotally mounted on the frame 1 by means of the trigger pin 25, the trigger being urged to rotate counter clockwise on the pin 25 by means of the trigger spring and trigger spring plunger 27. As noted, the trigger is provided with an extension 21 at the upper end of which is located the sear 20. The trigger 5 also provided with a spring-loaded cylinder latch release plunger 28 which is adapted to contact and depress the toe portion 29 of the pivoted cylinder latch 7, and thereby withdraw the cylinder latch from engagement with the notch 30 of the cylinder 3, when the hammer is being cocked as shown in FIG. 2. When the hammer approaches its fully cocked position the trigger is rotated clockwise a sufficient distance to allow the cylinder latch release plunger 28 to slip past the end of the toe portion 29 of the latch 7, thereby allowing the latch portion 31 of the latch 7 to re-engage one of the notches 30 of the cylinder 3, and when the hammer reaches its fully cocked position the trigger spring causes the trigger to rotate slightly counter clockwise so that the sear 20 engages the sear notch 19 of the hammer as shown in FIG. 3.

The cylinder latch 7 is pivotally mounted on the frame 1 by means of the pivot pin 32, the latch 7 being urged upwardly into contact with the cylinder 3 by the spring-loaded latch plunger 33. The latch portion 31 of the cylinder latch 7 normally engages one of the notches 30 formed in the cylinder 3 to prevent rotation of the cylinder when the hammer is in its safe or rebound position as shown in FIG. 1, and it also engages one of the notches 30 to prevent rotation of the cylinder when the hammer is in its fully cocked position as shown in FIG. 3. As noted, the cylinder latch 7 is withdrawn from engagement with the notches 30 when the revolver is being cocked in order to allow the pawl 6 to rotate the cylinder 3. In addition, the latch 7 is withdrawn from engagement with the notches 30 when the loading gate 9 is open in order to allow rotation of the cylinder when the cylinder is being loaded and unloaded.

As shown in FIGS. 4 through 8, the loading gate 9 is pivotally mounted on the frame 1 by means of the loading gate pivot member 35 the axis of which is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder 3. When the loading gate 9 is in its closed position as shown in FIG. 4, the upper portion of the gate is disposed in the opening 36 formed in the frame 1 directly in back of one of the chambers (not shown) of the cylinder 3, thereby preventing the removal or escape therefrom of a cartridge received in this chamber. When the loading gate 9 is swung sideways about the longitudinal axis of the pivot member 35 as shown in FIG. 5, the rearward end of the chamber formerly blocked by the upper portion of the gate 9 is now exposed, thereby permitting loading and unloading of this chamber of the cylinder 3. Rotation of the cylinder 3 to bring each of the other chambers of the cylinder into alignment with the opening 36 permits loading and unloading of each chamber in turn.

As previously noted, the loading gate 9 cooperates directly with the cylinder latch 7 to withdraw the latch portion 31 of the latch 7 from engagement with the notches 30 of the cylinder 3 when the loading gate is rotated sideways to its open position. The loading gate 9 is provided with a hub portion 37 that is concentric with the picot member 35 of the gate, the hub portion 37 being formed with a serpentine cylinder latch cam surface having a recessed portion 39 and a protrudent portion 40. The cylinder latch 7 comprises a bifurcated structure having a latch arm the latch portion 31 of which engages the notches 30 of the cylinder 3 and a cam follower arm the cam follower portion 43 of which cooperates with the cam surface of the loading gate 9 to disengage the latch 7 when the loading gate is open. When the loading gate 9 is closed as shown in FIG. 4 the cam follower portion 43 of the cylinder latch 7 is received in the recessed portion 39 of the cam surface of the loading gate, thereby permitting the latch portion 31 of the latch 7 to engage one of the notches 30 of the cylinder 3 as also shown in FIG. 4. When the loading gate 9 is rotated to its open position as shown in FIG. 5 the protrudent portion 40 of the cam surface of the gate 9 contacts and depresses the cam follower portion 43 of the cylinder latch 7, thereby withdrawing the latch portion 31 from engagement with the notch 30 of the cylinder 3 as also shown in FIG. 5.

In accordance with the invention, the loading gate 9 is provided with safety means which cooperates with the trigger 5 to permit the loading gate to be opened only when the hammer 4 is in its safe or rebound position and to prevent the hammer from being cocked when the loading gate is in its open position. As shown best in FIGS. 6 and 7, the hub portion 37 of the loading gate is formed with a trigger-receiving recess 45 and with a trigger safety element 46. The trigger-receiving recess 45 is adapted to receive the upper end of the trigger extension 21 when the loading gate is closed as shown in FIG. 4, and the safety element 46 is adapted to block forward movement of the trigger extension 21 when the loading gate is open as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. When the hammer 4 is being cocked the trigger cam surface 18 contacts and rotates the trigger extension 21 forwardly into the trigger-receiving recess 45 formed in the loading gage 9. As a result, the loading gate cannot be rotated to its open position when the hammer 4 and the trigger 5 are in their cocked positions. When the hammer 4 and trigger 5 are returned to their safe positions as shown in FIG. 1 the trigger extension 21 is withdrawn from the trigger-receiving recess 45 of the loading gate, thereby permitting the loading gate to be opened. When the loading gate 9 is in its open position as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 the trigger safety element 46 prevents forward movement of the extension 21 of the trigger 5. As a result, the hammer 4 cannot be cocked when the loading gate is open because rotation of the hammer is blocked by contact of the trigger cam surface 18 against the immovable trigger extension 21.

As shown best in FIGS. 9 through 13, the revolver of the invention is provided with manual safety means 48 which prevents the hammer from being cocked and fired when in its safe position (shown in FIGS. 9 through 12, and which permits the hammer to be cocked and fired when in its fire position (shown in FIGS. 1 through 3 and 13). The manual safety means 48 comprises a transverse shaft 49 that is rotatably mounted in bore 50 formed in the frame 1, the axis of the shaft 49 being perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the cylinder 3. The safety means is adapted to be rotated about 90° from its safe position (shown in FIG. 9) to its fire position, the spring-loaded detent 51 holding the safety means in its safe or fire position, as the case may be, in the manner known in the art. The shaft 49 is formed with a hammer-receiving recess 54 and with a pawl-receiving recess 55, the non-recessed portions of the shaft comprising the hammer safety element 56 and the pawl safety element 57, respectively, of the safety means 48.

When the safety means 48 is rotated to its fire position, the hammer-receiving recess 54 is disposed in front of the hammer 4 as shown in FIG. 1, thereby allowing the hammer 4 to strike the firing pin 24 when the revolver is fired. At the same time, the pawl-receiving recess 55 is positioned above the pawl 6, thereby permitting the pawl to move upwardly to rotate the cylinder 3 when the hammer is being cocked as shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 13. When the safety means 48 is rotated to its safe position, the hammer safety element 56 is disposed directly in front of the hammer 4 as shown in FIGS. 10 and 12, thereby blocking forward movement of the hammer against the firing pin 24. At the same time, the pawl safety element 57 is positioned directly above the pawl 6 as shown in FIG. 11, thereby blocking upward movement of the pawl which, in turn, prevents cocking of the hammer 4. Conversely, when the hammer 4 is cocked and the pawl 6 is in its upward position as shown in FIGS. 3 and 13, the safety means 48 cannot be rotated to the safe position because it is now blocked by the pawl. Thus, it will be seen that it is a characteristic of the safety means 48 that, when in its safe position, it locks the hammer 4 in the rebound position only, unlike the usual safety which locks the hammer of a conventional firearm only when the hammer of the firearm is in its cocked position.