Title:
BRAKE MECHANISM ATTACHED TO A SKI
United States Patent 3704024


Abstract:
A brake mechanism adapted to be secured to a ski for braking the ski, comprises at least one brake element movable, upon release of the boot from the ski binding, from a position above the running surface of the ski automatically downwardly into a ski braking position, to thereby engage with the snow for the purpose of exerting a braking force upon the ski. A retaining element actuatable upon inserting the boot into the ski binding retains the braking element in its preparatory braking position, so that upon release of such retaining element the braking element moves from its preparatory braking position into its actual ski braking position. A first locking-pawl arrangement serves to retain the braking element in a locked position for convenient transport and storage of the ski, and a second locking-pawl arrangement serves to retain such braking element in its preparatory braking position, this retaining element cooperating with said first locking-pawl arrangement and said second locking-pawl arrangement such that actuation of said retaining element causes release of the locked position of said braking element and transfer thereof into its preparatory braking position against a spring force effective at said retaining element.



Inventors:
MARTIN HANS
Application Number:
05/113211
Publication Date:
11/28/1972
Filing Date:
02/08/1971
Assignee:
HANS MARTIN
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63C5/06; A63C7/10; (IPC1-7): A63C7/10
Field of Search:
280/11
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3433494BRAKE ATTACHMENT FOR SKI1969-03-18Hinterholzer
3083028Ski stop1963-03-26Miller
3048418Ski-stopping device1962-08-07Gertsch



Foreign References:
IT459218A
AT216398B1961-07-25
DE100284C
Primary Examiner:
Betts, Kenneth H.
Assistant Examiner:
Smith, Milton L.
Claims:
What is claimed is

1. A brake mechanism adapted to be secured to a ski having a ski binding for braking the ski, comprising at least one braking element which upon release of the ski boot from the ski binding is automatically movable from a preparatory braking position disposed above the running surface of the ski downwardly into a ski braking position, to thereby engage the snow for the purpose of exerting a braking force upon the ski, a retaining element which can be actuated upon inserting the ski boot into the ski binding for retaining said braking element in its preparatory braking position, so that upon release of said retaining element said braking element moves from said preparatory braking position into said ski braking position, a first locking-pawl arrangement for retaining said braking element in a locked position for convenient transport and storage of the ski, a second locking-pawl arrangement for retaining said braking element in said preparatory braking position, said retaining element cooperating with said first locking-pawl arrangement and said second locking-pawl arrangement such that actuation of said retaining element causes release of the locked position of said braking element and transfer thereof into its preparatory braking position against a spring force effective at said retaining element, each locking-pawl arrangement comprising a first nose member for retaining the braking element in its locked position and a second nose member for retaining the braking element in its preparatory braking position, each said nose member being operatively coupled with said braking element, and a first pawl member engageable with said first nose member and a second pawl member engageable with said second nose member, both said first and second pawl members being operatively connected with said retaining element, actuation of said retaining element releasing said first pawl member from said first nose member and causing engagement of said second pawl member with said second nose member, whereby said braking element assumes its preparatory braking position from which such braking element can be subsequently released in order to brake the ski.

2. A brake mechanism adapted to be secured to a ski having a ski binding for braking the ski, comprising at least one braking element which upon release of the ski boot from the ski binding is automatically movable from a preparatory braking position disposed above the running surface of the ski downwardly into a ski braking position, to thereby engage the snow for the purpose of exerting a braking force upon the ski, a retaining element which can be actuated upon inserting the ski boot into the ski binding for retaining said braking element in its preparatory braking position, so that upon release of said retaining element said braking element moves from said preparatory braking position into said ski braking position, a first locking-pawl arrangement for retaining said braking element in a locked position for convenient transport and storage of the ski, a second locking-pawl arrangement for retaining said braking element in said preparatory braking position, said retaining element cooperating with said first locking-pawl arrangement and said second locking-pawl arrangement such that actuation of said retaining element causes release of the locked position of said braking element and transfer thereof into its preparatory braking position against a spring force effective at said retaining element, a mounting bracket capable of being attached to the ski, means for pivotably mounting said braking element at said mounting bracket, spring means for urging said braking element into its ski braking position, said locking-pawl arrangements comprising a pair of pawl members, a control element for said pair of pawl members, means for adjustably mounting said control element and said pair of pawl members at said mounting bracket, said retaining element being pivotably connected with said control element.

3. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 2, wherein said mounting bracket and said braking element are disposed in a direction extending transverse to the lengthwise axis of the associated ski, said braking element when assuming its locked position and its preparatory braking position being disposed at the region of the upper surface of the ski.

4. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 2, wherein said retaining element comprises a resilient bracket which can be depressed by the ski boot of the user, said resilient bracket having an end mounted at said control element.

5. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 1, wherein said first nose member for retaining said brake element in its locked position is situated elevationally higher than said second nose member for retaining said braking element in its preparatory braking position.

6. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 1, further including means for resiliently moving said first and second pawl members towards one another.

7. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 1, further including a control element cooperating with said first and second pawl members, said control element having a pair of cams against which engage said first and second pawl members.

8. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 1, further including a control element cooperating with said first and second pawl members, one of said pawl members being integrally formed with said control element and the other of said pawl members being resilient.

9. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 1, further including a control element cooperating with said first and second pawl members, said first and second pawl members being rigidly arranged with respect to one another and formng an integral component with said control element.

10. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 1, wherein said braking element is a single element which, when assuming its ski braking position, extends beneath the running surface of the associated ski.

11. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 10, further including a serrated portion provided for said braking element.

12. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 1, wherein said braking element possesses a bipartite construction defined by two braking element portions, one braking element portion of said braking element being provided with a slot into which extends the other braking element portion of said braking element, and both portions of said braking element being pivotably coupled with one another by a pivot pin.

13. The braking mechanism as defined in claim 1, further including an additional braking element provided for the ski, whereby both braking elements when assuming their ski braking position extend to both sides of the ski beneath the running surface thereof.

14. The brake mechanism as defined in claim 1, wherein said braking element is provided with a serrated portion for enhancing the ski braking action.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a new and improved brake mechanism secured to a ski, this brake mechanism being of the type incorporating at least one brake element which, upon removing the ski boot from the binding, automatically moves from a position above the running surface of the ski downwardly into a braking position, thereby generating a braking force for the ski in the snow. Further, the brake mechanism of the invention embodies a retaining element actuated by the ski boot, this retaining element serving to retain the brake element in a preparatory position, so that upon release of the retaining element the brake element assumes its ski-braking position.

Brake mechanisms of the prior art which have been proposed for braking the ski upon release from the boot possess the drawback that the brake element, during such time as the ski is no longer coupled with the boot, either is located in the ski braking position and therefore, for instance, during carrying or transport of the ski is obstructive and dangerous, or else such braking element is retained by a locking mechanism in a position above the running surface of the ski. However, the use of a locking mechanism to retain the brake element in this raised position has been found to be quite disadvantageous for a brake mechanism, which simultaneously constitutes an important safety feature for the ski, and in fact has been found to be even dangerous. This is so because the possibility readily exists that when using the ski the skier forgets to release the locking mechanism for the brake element. Consequently, the braking feature intended for the brake mechanism is no longer present when the skier falls and the ski detaches from the boot, resulting usually in a runaway ski ascending in uncontrolled fashion down the slope, endangering other skiers, and oftentimes causing mishaps upon striking, many times at high velocity, another skier. Furthermore, a standard locking mechanism of the type proposed in the prior art has the additional drawback that it must be manually actuated, therefore requires the attention of the skier and, in fact, counteracts the purpose of modern day bindings which allow a skier to insert the boot into the ski without having to bend over.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, there is still present a real need in the art for a brake mechanism for stopping a ski, particularly when no straps are used to attach the ski to the boot or leg of the user, which avoids the aforenoted disadvantages present in the state-of-the-art brake mechanisms provided for this purpose. Therefore, a primary objective of the instant invention is to provide a brake mechanism of the mentioned type which effectively and reliably fulfills the existing need in the art and overcomes the aforementioned prevailing drawbacks existing with the prior art constructions of this type.

Another and more specific object of the instant invention, and in keeping with the aforenoted general purposes of the above object, is to provide a brake mechanism for a ski in which the brake element, when the ski boot is released from the ski, is located in a position above the lower edge of the ski, and only after connecting the boot with the ski and after actuating the retaining element, and specifically upon release of the boot from the ski and after release of the retaining element, can such brake element move into the ski braking position.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a brake mechanism of the mentioned type which is of relatively simple design, economical to manufacture, extremely reliable in operation, does not require the particular attention of the skier to be placed into operation, in other words automatically assumes a preparatory braking position when the boot is inserted into the ski and automatically moves into its ski braking position when the skier thereafter falls and the ski is released from the boot, and thereby renders it impossible to prevent such braking mechanism from carrying out its intended function.

Now, in order to implement these and still further objects of the invention, which will become more readily apparent as the description proceeds, the brake mechanism of the present invention is manifested by the features that the brake element is retained in an arrested or locked position by means of a first locking pawl arrangement and is retained in its preparatory position by means of a second locking-pawl arrangement. Release of the arrested or locking position and the transition into the preparatory position is undertaken after actuating a retaining element against a resilient or spring force effective at the retaining element.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will be better understood and objects other than those set forth above, will become apparent when consideration is given to the following detailed description thereof. Such description makes reference to the annexed drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front or end view, with the ski shown in section, of a first embodiment of brake mechanism attached to the ski and with the brake element depicted in its braking position;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the braking mechanism depicted in FIG. 1, yet this time with the brake element located in its arrested or locked position;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side view of the arrangement of FIG. 2, yet this time showing the brake element in its preparatory position;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the brake mechanism attached to the ski for the arrangement of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a further embodiment of inventive brake mechanism showing details of the pawls and the control body or element;

FIG. 6 illustrates a modified version of the braking element;

FIG. 7 illustrates a still further modification of the brake element which now is shown as formed as a bipartite or two-piece body member;

FIG. 8 is an end view, similar to FIG. 1, of a different brake mechanism employing two brake elements; and

FIG. 9 is a sectional view through the brake mechanism of FIG. 8, taken substantially along the lines IX--IX thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Describing now the drawings, and referring initially to the brake mechanism depicted in conjunction with the ski 1 shown in FIG. 1 in cross section therein, it will be seen that to the upper surface of this ski there is attached a bearing bracket 2 in any suitable fashion, for instance through the use of screws by way of example. The bearing bracket 2 is equipped at one side with two upstanding straps or plates 3 and 4 and at the opposite side with a similarly upstanding leg 5 having a slot 6. The straps 3 and 4 are bored through for the purpose of receiving in piercing relationship a bolt member 7, at the cylindrical portion of which there is mounted a plate-shaped brake element 10. Brake element 10 is rocked or pivoted into the position depicted in FIG. 1 through the use of a suitable resilient element, here shown in the form of a torsion spring 11. FIG. 1 also shows in phantom lines the position 10' which the brake element 2 assumes when located in its blocked or arrested position as well as in its preparatory position. In that case, and again as best observed by referring to FIG. 1, the brake element 10 is then disposed at the upper surface of the ski, while, when it assumes its ski braking position, such brake element then depends downwardly beneath the running surface of the associated ski 1.

Now, as best observed by referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, showing the details of the brake mechanism of the arrangement of FIG. 1, two pawls 13 and 14, or equivalent devices, are arranged at the leg member 5. These pawls 13 and 14 are pivotably mounted at the pins or pivot bolts 15 and 16, respectively, and a pressure spring 17 is shown arranged between pawls 13 and 14. Pressure spring 17 serves to press the pawls 13 and 14 against noses or cams 18 and 19 respectively, provided at a control body or element 20. Control body 20 is pivotably mounted at the upstanding leg member 5 with the aid of the pivot pin 21.

Continuing, it will be observed that the braking element 10 possesses two arresting or locking members 25, 26, which, when the braking element 10 assumes its arresting and preparatory positions, are disposed between the pawls 13,14. As will be more fully explained hereinafter, the locking portion or member 25 is intended to cooperate with the pawl 13 (FIG. 2), while the other locking or arresting member 26 is intended to cooperate with the pawl 14 (FIG. 3).

Now, as best observed by referring to any one of FIGS. 2 to 5, it will be recognized that reference character 30 serves to designate a retaining or holding bracket which is secured at one end in a bore 31 provided at the bearing bracket 2, the other end of this retaining or holding bracket 30 being engageable with a bore 32 of the control body 20, as best observed by specifically referring to FIG. 1. The retaining bracket 30 is of preferably resilient construction so that it protrudes upwardly away from the surface of the ski when it is not tensioned, as shown in FIG. 2, while when depressing this retaining bracket 30, into the position shown in FIG. 3, such bears against the top or upper surface of the ski and simultaneously rocks the control body 20, specifically into the position shown in FIG. 3.

With the benefit of the above description of brake mechanism designed according to the teachings of the invention, the operation thereof will now be considered and is as follows:

As best shown by referring to FIG. 2, when the brake element 10 assumes the arrested or locked position, upon downwardly depressing the brake element 10 the pawl 13 engages with the higher located lock or locking member 25, the retaining or holding bracket 30 then depending upwardly at spaced relationship from the ski 1, as shown clearly in this FIG. 2. In this position of the brake element 10, the ski can be readily transported and carried without the brake mechanism, which advantageously is arranged or mounted at the region of the heel portion of the ski boot when placed upon the ski, being obstructive or getting in the way. This is so, because in the arrested or locked position of the braking element the latter does not appreciably depend or extend past the modern conventional ski bindings used at the present.

Now, as best observed by referring to FIG. 3, as soon as the ski boot is placed into the ski, then the retaining or holder bracket 30 is depressed and the control body 20 is rocked or pivoted in such a manner that the pawl 13 is released from the locking member or nose 25 and at the same time the other pawl 14 is engaged with the somewhat lower situated locking member 26 which serves to retain the braking element 10 in its preparatory position. Owing to the above operation and the rocking or pivoting of the control body 20 it is impossible for the pawl 13 to again engage with the locking nose or locking member 25 while the boot is in the ski and standing upon the now depressed retaining bracket 30. The position of the components depicted in FIG. 3 corresponds to the preparatory position for the brake element 10 in which, when the ski boot is removed from the retaining bracket 30, for instance as would occur if the skier were to fall during skiing and the ski were to detach from the boot, therefore, then the bracket 30 would spring back into the position of FIG. 2. When such happens the pawl 14 releases the locking nose member 26 so that the brake element 10 can now be moved under the action of the force of the torsion spring 11 into the braking position of FIG. 1 and initiates the braking action to which the associated ski 1 is then exposed.

FIG. 5 illustrates a modified construction of the control body or control element, which here has been designated by reference character 20'. While the construction of this control body 20' is somewhat different from the previously considered control body or element 20, the function is the same. Control body 20' together with the pawl 34 is formed as an integral element, while the other pawl 33 is of resilient construction, and is inserted in a receiving notch at the lower region of the control element or body 20'. Just as was the case for the brake element 10 of the embodiment of FIGS. 1 to 4, here the brake element 10" likewise has a pair of arresting or locking nose members 35 and 36 destined to cooperate with the pawls 33 and 34 respectively.

Now if the brake element 10" is placed into the arresting and preparatory position, then, with the retaining bracket 30 not depressed, the pawl 33 engages with the locking nose member 35, causing the braking or brake element 10" to assume its locked or arrested position, which it will be recalled corresponds to the position of the brake element 10 of FIG. 2. Now, upon depressing the retaining bracket or lever 30, the control body or element 20' is then rocked or pivoted in clockwise direction. It will be evident from the showing of FIG. 5 that this causes the pawl 33 to disengage from the locking nose member 35 and at the same time the pawl 34 comes into engagement with the other locking nose member 36. This position of the components then corresponds to the preparatory position for the braking element 10", so that upon release of the resilient retaining bracket 30 the braking element 10" is correspondingly released and can be moved into its ski braking position.

Instead of using a resilient retaining or holding bracket 30, it would also be conceiveable to employ a rigid bracket or lever, which upon release of the boot from the ski, then is raised by the action of a separate spring.

FIG. 6 illustrates a further embodiment of the braking element, this time designated by reference character 40. Braking element 40 is constructed in such a way that it extends beneath the running surface of the ski 1 when it assumes its ski braking position. This in contrast to the operation of the brake element 10 of the arrangement of FIG. 1 which while depending from the ski into a position lower than the running or bottom surface of the ski, still does not extend beneath the running surface of the ski. In this modified version of brake element 40, the braking surface of such brake element 40 is enlarged and, additionally, there is improved the braking action of the brake mechanism particularly then when encountering snow conditions where the snow is relatively hard. The braking action can be intensified by providing a serrated or toothed portion 41 at the brake element 40, particularly effective under icy conditions of the piste. A similar serrated arrangement 40 can be likewise provided for the embodiment of FIG. 1. The arresting and rest position of the brake element 40 has been shown in phantom lines at location 40'. In all other respects, it will be evident that the brake mechanism of this embodiment may function similar to the embodiments heretofore discussed in conjunction with FIGS. 1 to 5 inclusive.

FIG. 7 illustrates an embodiment incorporating a modified construction of the brake element which here is shown formed from the two brake element portions 50 and 51 articulated or hinged to one another by a pivot pin 52. The brake element portion 51 will be seen to be equipped with a cut-out or recess 53 into which depends or extends the other brake element portion 50. The end 11' of the otherwise not-visible torsion spring, corresponding to torsion spring 11 of FIG. 4, presses upon a pin 54, in this way causing both brake element portions 50 and 51 to assume their ski braking position.

In the arresting and preparatory positions of the bipartite brake element 50,51 both brake element portions thereof assume the position shown in phantom lines and designated by reference characters 50' and 51'. In that position, the end of the spring assumes the location designated by reference character 11", and the pin or shaft against which bears the spring end 11" has been indicated at 54', while the pivot pin coupling together both brake element portions 50' and 51' has been indicated by reference character 52'. Here also, and as shown by referring to FIG. 7, the brake element portion 51 is advantageously equipped with a serrated portion 41 improving the braking action when the piste is icy.

FIG. 8 illustrates a construction of brake mechanism in which two separate brake elements 60 and 61 are arranged in such a fashion that they are located at opposite longitudinal sides of the ski and, upon assuming the braking position depicted in solid lines in FIG. 8, engage beneath the associated ski 1. The advantage of this type of arrangement resides in the fact that the spring 11 (FIGS. 2, 3 and 4) for rocking the brake elements 60 and 61 does not have to be designed so strongly, particularly since even during lateral displacement of the ski at least one of the brake elements 60 or 61 is in its effective braking position. In the constructions discussed above where only one brake element depends from one longitudinal side or edge of the ski, the spring 11 must possess a construction and design of sufficient strength to prevent any upward tilting or rocking of the brake element during lateral displacement of the ski towards one side, otherwise the action of the brake mechanism becomes ineffectual.

In the arrangement of FIG. 8, two bearing brackets 2 equipped with the straps 3 for mounting the brake elements 60 and 61 are arranged at the upper surface of the ski in the same way as was described for the arrangement of FIGS. 1 to 4. The rocked or arrested position of both brake elements 60 and 61 has been shown in FIG. 8 by the phantom lines. Both of the brake elements 60 and 61 can be pulled into this locked or arrested position out of the braking position through the use of any suitable device, such as for instance non-illustrated traction cables.

As best shown by referring to FIG. 9, both of the braking elements 60 and 61 each are equipped with two locking nose members 25 and 26 which engage with the associated pawls 63 and 64 for the reasons discussed heretofore. The pawls 63 and 64 together with the control body or element 65 form an integral component mounted by means of a bolt or pivot pin 66 so as to be pivotal at the vertically or upright extending legs 67 of the bearing brackets 2. These bearing brackets 2 possess a sufficient thickness so that the pawls 25 and 26 of both brake elements 60 and 61 can engage with the control element 65. The legs 67 of the bearing brackets 2 will be seen to be equipped with laterally protruding flaps or lip portions 68 and form a housing for receiving the control body or element 65.

In the arrangement of FIG. 9, the braking element 60 has been depicted in its arrested position. It can be constructed of a number of components, whereby then the individual components are retained together by flexible connection elements 69, for instance formed of plastic or rubber. Here also the brake elements 60 and 61 can be equipped with a serrated portion 70 and 71, respectively, improving the hooking action into the snow of these braking elements particularly when encountering hard snow or icy conditions.

The mode of operation of the control element 65 of FIG. 9 is similar to the embodiments heretofore discussed. This control element 65 possesses a projection or extended portion 72 at which there is anchored the above-discussed retaining or holding bracket, here designated by reference character 73. This holding bracket 73 advantageously corresponds to the holding or retaining bracket 30 of the embodiments of FIGS. 2, 3 and 5, and is configured such that it retains the control element 65 in the position of FIG. 9 where the locking nose member 25, upon raising the associated braking element, can ratchet or engage with the pawl 63. Upon depressing the retaining bracket 73 with the aid of the ski boot, and specifically against the spring force acting at the retaining bracket, the arresting pawl 63 is released and the brake elements 60, 61 engage by means of the locking nose means 26 with the preparatory pawl 64. Now, if the retaining bracket 73 is released, for instance on the occasion of the skier taking a fall, then it springs back and due to rocking of the control body 65 releases the pawl 64, so that the corresponding brake element is rocked under spring force into the ski braking position.

Instead of designing the retaining bracket 73 so as to possess a resilient construction, such could also be designed to be a relatively rigid member, whereby, as will be recalled from the discussion above, a separate spring would then be necessary to always bring this retaining bracket 73 back into the position of FIG. 9. The retaining bracket 73 would then be depressed against the spring force by means of the boot.

The various embodiments of brake mechanisms discussed herein are advantageously arranged at the region of the ski binding of each ski. The brake mechanism can be, for instance, mounted at the ski plate carrying one of the ski binding portions, so that such ski binding and brake mechanism form an integral unit.

All of the described brake mechanisms are equipped with brake elements which are rocked in a plane transverse to the lengthwise or longitudinal axis of the associated ski. In other words, the pivot axis for such brake element or brake elements is arranged parallel to the longitudinal axis of the ski. By virtue of this arrangement, it is ensured that the braking action can be achieved without resorting to the use of extremely strong pivot springs, since the brake element or elements are arranged transverse to the main direction of movement of the ski. If during a fall and release of the ski a ski slides laterally, then, if the pivot spring for displacing the brake element into the braking position is not designed to be strong enough, it would be possible for the brake element to be rocked back. However, this can be prevented in positive fashion by resorting to the arrangement of FIG. 8 utilizing two brake elements, since in such case always one of the brake elements during lateral movement of the ski remains effective in its braking position without having to resort to strong pivot springs, whereas during the forward and rearward movement of the associated ski both brake elements remain in their effectual ski braking position. This renders possible the use of weaker pivot springs, which in consideration of an unintentional release of the brake elements contributes toward preventing accidents.

It will be remembered that with the described embodiments of brake mechanism disclosed herein the locking nose members 25, 26, 35, 36 were considered as arranged at the associated brake element and the pawls 13,14, 33,34, 63 and 64, at the bearing or mount brackets 2. However, it would be possible to have a reversal of this arrangement without departing from the teachings of the invention or the effect obtained by the braking mechanisms thereof, and specifically wherein the locking nose members could be mounted at the bearing brackets and the pawls then at the associated brake elements.

While there is shown and described present preferred embodiments of the invention, it is to be distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto but may be otherwise variously embodied and practiced within the scope of the following claims. ACCORDINGLY,