Title:
METHOD OF MAKING MACHINE SEWN JACKET AND JACKET CONSTRUCTION
United States Patent 3639914


Abstract:
A man's jacket having a sweater-type feel sewn entirely by machine and made of stretchable materials. It includes a shoulder cap assembly blind stitch machine tacked thereto at several points only. It has the appearance of a tailored jacket, but does not require hand sewing operations conventionally used in making tailored jackets.



Inventors:
ELLMAN HAROLD R
Application Number:
05/052799
Publication Date:
02/08/1972
Filing Date:
07/07/1970
Assignee:
HAROLD R. ELLMAN
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/268
International Classes:
A41D1/02; (IPC1-7): A41D1/00
Field of Search:
2/93,268
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2274261Shoulder pad1942-02-24Vogel
1697959Coat and jacket and method of constructing the same1929-01-08Maronna
0999345N/A1911-08-01



Primary Examiner:
Scanlan Jr., Richard J.
Claims:
What is claimed is

1. A completely machine sewn jacket of stretchable fabrics imparting a sweaterlike feel to the jacket comprising, a pair of stretchable knit fabric fronts machine sewn along their sides to a centrally machine joined pair of backs of the same goods to provide side seams, the fronts each being provided with a fused stretchable interliner, said fronts and backs being machine sewn to each other at the shoulders with a nonstretchable cloth tape to form shoulder seams and to form armholes, an undercollar machine sewn with a nonstretchable tape to said backs, said undercollar being provided with a fused stretchable interliner, said undercollar being machine sewn to said fronts at top edges thereof, and stretchable linings, facings, a neckpiece and a topcollar machine sewn together as a preassembly machine sewn to said fronts, to said side seams, to said undercollar and to the peripheries of said armholes, the lower edge of said lining being fused to the adjacent lower edge of said front, and sleeves machine sewn to said armholes to form armhole seams.

2. The jacket of claim 1 further including spaced machine blind stitch tacks joining each said facing and the adjacent front adjacent the line of joinder of each said facing and lining.

3. The jacket of claim 1 further comprising a floating shoulder piece assembly, said shoulder piece assembly comprising a generally triangular shoulder piece and a sleeve cap machine sewn thereto to form a seam, said shoulder piece and sleeve cap being of the same fabric as the front and back and machine blind stitch tacks joining each said shoulder piece at its apices to a said shoulder seam and to two spaced points at a said armhole seam, the seam joining said shoulder piece and sleeve cap being disposed toward said sleeve.

4. The jacket of claim 1 further comprising a plurality of machine blind stitch tacks for keeping said collars from spreading, said tacks being spacedly located beneath and adjacent said undercollar and passing through said backs and fronts and into said facings and neckpiece, respectively.

5. A completely machine sewn jacket of stretchable knit goods imparting a sweater feel to the jacket, said jacket comprising stretchable fronts, backs, collars, facings, linings and sleeves all machine sewn to each other, and a floating shoulder piece assembly free of confinement by said lining and other jacket parts and being secured to said jacket only at several spaced points, said shoulder piece assembly comprising a generally triangular shoulder piece and a sleeve cap machine sewn thereto along one side thereof to form a seam, the side of the shoulder piece to which the sleeve cap is sewn being blind stitch machine tacked at opposite ends to an armhole seam and the other point of said triangular shoulder piece being machine blind stitch tacked to a shoulder seam.

6. A method of assembling a man's jacket of stretchable fabric absent hand sewing to impart a sweater-type feel thereto, the steps comprising, cutting fronts, backs, facings, an undercollar, a top collar and a neckpiece from a stretchable interliner material, and cutting linings from a stretchable liner material, machine sewing the backs to form a center seam and machine sewing the fronts, each of which has an interliner fused thereto, to the free sides of the backs to form side seams, machine sewing said undercollar to said backs through a nonstretchable tape, machine sewing said backs and said fronts through nonstretchable tapes to form shoulder seams and to define armholes, and machine sewing said undercollar to said fronts, all to form a shell assembly, machine sewing linings, facings, a neckpiece and a top collar to form a preassembly, machine sewing said preassembly to said shell assembly, and said linings to said shoulder seams and side seams, fusing the lower edge of said lining to the lower edges of said fronts, and machine sewing sleeves to said armholes to form armhole seams.

7. The method of claim 6 further including the step of machine blind stitch tacking each said facing and the adjacent front adjacent the line of joinder of said facing and lining to each other at a plurality of spaced points therealong.

8. The method of claim 6 further comprising the steps of machine sewing a shoulder piece assembly comprising a generally triangular shoulder piece and a sleeve cap, and blind stitch machine tacking each said shoulder piece at its apices to said shoulder seam and to two spaced points at said armhole seam.

9. The method of claim 6 comprising the further step of machine blind stitch tacking said collars at a plurality of points spacedly located beneath and adjacent said undercollar and passing through said backs and fronts and into said facings and neckpiece to keep said collars from spreading.

10. The method of making a completely machine sewn jacket of stretchable knit goods to impart a sweater-type feel to the jacket, said jacket including machine joined stretchable knit fronts, backs, collars, facings, linings and sleeves, machine sewing a generally triangular shoulder piece and a sleeve cap, said sleeve cap lying along one side of said shoulder piece, to form a seam, machine blind stitch tacking said shoulder piece to said jacket, the ends of said seam being tacked to an armhole seam and the other point of said triangular shoulder piece being tacked to a shoulder seam, said shoulder piece assembly otherwise being unsecured to said jacket and being free from confinement by said lining.

Description:
This invention relates to a completely machine sewn jacket having a tailored look, but having the feel when worn of a sweater, and to a method of making the jacket. The jacket is made substantially entirely of stretchable materials which imparts to it the feel of a sweater. The use of such materials when assembled in accordance with this invention makes it possible to size jackets in fewer sizes to accommodate a full range of men's jacket sizes.

In accordance with this invention, the jacket is preferably made of a lightweight double knit material, and is lined, where necessary, with a woven stretch lining. Preferably the interliners used are of a felted material which is fusible to the jacket parts which the interliner pieces are to reinforce.

For economy and efficiency of manufacture, the jacket of this invention is made entirely by machine sewing and therefore eliminates all hand sewing operations. However, the jacket has the same appearance as a tailored, partially hand-sewn jacket.

In accordance with this invention, a first subassembly including a pair of backs, a pair of fronts, and an undercollar are machine sewn together, the fronts and the undercollar being provided with a fused interliner. This subassembly is further machine sewn to define the shoulder seams and armholes, and the undercollar edges are machine joined to the fronts.

A further subassembly including facings, lining sections, a top collar and a neckpiece is machine sewn. The two assemblies are then joined together by a lockstitch, are turned inside out, and are edged seamed. The lining is machine sewn to the armhole, to the shoulder seam and to the side seams. The lower edge of the lining is fused to the lower edge of the jacket.

To eliminate the conventional hand sewing of the lining to the front adjacent the facing, a plurality of machine blind stitch tacks are made at spaced locations along the line of joinder of the lining and facing. To keep the top collar and undercollar from spreading, and to avoid further hand operations, a plurality of machine blind stitch tacks are made at spaced locations through the backs and fronts of the jacket just below the collars, thereby to join the facings to the fronts at the upper edges of the fronts, and the backs to the neckpiece at the upper edges of the backs. The sleeves are then positioned in the armholes and are machine sewn to the jacket.

Thereafter, a floating shoulder piece assembly is attached to the jacket adjacent each armhole. The shoulder piece assembly is generally triangular in shape and is machine blind stitch tacked at each apex, one such tack being at the shoulder seam, and the other two tacks lying substantially along the armhole seam joining the jacket and the sleeves.

This free-floating shoulder piece assembly which desirably also includes a sleeve cap portion machine sewn thereto, and which further is desirably lined with a fusible interliner or stay material, uniquely develops the shoulder line to improve the finished jacket appearance, and the jacket therefore develops a tailored look with a sweater feel. That is largely because the shoulder piece is free of confinement by the lining and free except for the points at which it is machine tacked to the jacket.

Further objects, advantages and features of this invention will become apparent from the following description and drawings of which:

FIG. 1 is a front view of a jacket of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial assembly of the fronts, backs and undercollar of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a further development of the assembly of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 illustrates a lining, facing, top collar and neckpiece subassembly of the jacket of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a further development of the jacket of FIG. 1 viewed from the inside of the jacket;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged rear view of a portion f FIG. 1 with the collar turned up;

FIG. 7 illustrates a floating shoulder piece assembly; and

FIG. 8 illustrates the floating shoulder piece assembly of FIG. 7 as it is positioned in the jacket of FIG. 1.

A man's jacket 10 of this invention comprises a number of cut and assembled pieces. These pieces are variously cut as from a double-knit stretchable fabric, from a woven stretch lining material and from a stretchable fusible felted interliner material. The jacket is made exclusively of such fabric pieces, except for several pieces of stretch-resistant cloth tape pieces which are located in places to be described, and except for decorative pieces such as buttons and the like.

Referring first to FIG. 2, jacket 10 includes a right front section 12, a left front section 14, a right back section 16 and a left back section 18, each of which is cut from double-knit stretchable fabric material.

Front sections 12 and 14 are appropriately cut and machine sewn to provide darts 20. Each front section is then pressed and lined with a heat-fused interliner section 22. Interliner section 22 (only one of which is shown in FIG. 2) is a stretchable fusible felted material which is fused to the fronts 12 and 14 by pressing same with a hot press member, such as a garment press or an iron.

Pockets P (FIG. 1) are suitably machine sewn. They comprise a fabric patch (of the same material as the fronts) and a woven stretch lining material. After the pockets are assembled, they are machine topstitched as at 24 around their sides and bottom to the fronts of front sections 12 and 14.

Back sections 16 and 18 are separately serged along the edges which are to form the center back seam 23 and the vents. The left vent is dressed during serging to reduce its width by about five-eighths inch. Thereafter, the back sections 16 and 18 are machine lockstitched to each other adjacent the serging above the vents. The left vent is creased, and the back sections are topstitched (the back seam 23 is raised) down to the vents and then downwardly to the bottom of the left vent. The right vent is creased and the to of the vents are closed by a diagonal vent stitch 26. The serged edge of the right back section 24 is shown at 28.

Next, a nonstretchable cloth tape segment 30 is machine secured at the tops of the back sections as by a machine lockstitch, and preferably at the same time an undercollar 32 (of the same fabric as the fronts and backs) is secured by a machine lockstitch to the tops of the back sections at the tape 30. Undercollar 32 is desirably provided with an interliner portion 33 of the same material as the interliners 22.

Thereafter, the backs and fronts are machine serged to each other along serged side seams 34 and 36 (FIG. 2). At this point the shoulder edges S are machine lockstitched to form shoulder seams 38 through shoulder tapes 40, and the edges E of undercollar 32 are secured by a machine lockstitch to front section edges F to form seams 42. Finally, the bottom edge G of the assembled fronts and backs is serged and is folded and creased until the serged edge G lies in the dotted line position of FIG. 2. The serged edge G is then machine blind stitched to the main bodies of the fronts and backs generally between the positions marked X on dotted line G (FIG. 2). This then forms the front and back shell assembly 46.

A lining and facing assembly 44 (FIG. 4) is prepared. FIG. 4 illustrates substantially half of a symmetrical assembly. Facings 50 are cut, as are a top collar 52 and a neckpiece 54. These are cut from the same material as the fronts and backs. The facings 50 (only one of which is shown in FIG. 4) are serged to the top collar and neckpiece at seams H and J, respectively, and the neckpiece to the top collar along a continuation of seam H. The lining sections 51 (only one of which is shown), previously provided with suitable pockets F cut from the same woven stretch material as the lining itself, are then chain stitched to the facing along seam K.

The lining and facing assembly 44 is then placed back to back with the front and back assembly 46. The corresponding edges and a nonstretchable cloth tape (not shown) are juxtaposed and the edges are lockstitched together, the tape minimizing the stretchability at that point. The tape rises only to slightly above the buttons (FIG. 1) at each front edge. The lockstitching runs from substantially adjacent the seam K at the bottom of the jacket upwardly along the front section and the confronting facing, across the juxtaposed top and bottom collars, and downwardly along the other front section and confronting facing to the bottom of the jacket. The entire assemblage is then turned inside out, and the lockstitched edge is edgestitched adjacent thereto to form the continuous edge stitch 60 (see FIG. 1).

Thereafter, the facing and fronts are blind stitch machine tacked through the facing (but not through the fronts) at a plurality of spaced tack points T (FIG. 5). This eliminates conventional hand stitching of the lining to the fronts. Lining 51 is then machine lockstitched inside out to the side seams 34, 36 so that side seams 34 and 36 do not show (FIG. 5). Then the lining 51 is serged to the armholes (at M) and to the shoulders along shoulder tapes 40 (at N). A fusible tape is positioned at the base of the lining (under edge L) to fuse the lining to the bottom of the front sections. That eliminates the conventional hand stitching normally used at this point and finishes securing the lining 51 to the jacket.

As shown in FIG. 6, the fronts, backs, facings and neckpiece are machine blind tacked from the outside of the jacket at tacks W to assist in keeping the top and bottom collars from spreading apart. This is in lieu of the conventional stitching of the collars together generally along the line Y and further simplifies the assembly of the jacket. Desirably the neckpiece is also blind stitched centrally to the backs adjacent the center seam.

Sleeves 70 are formed of sleeve pieces cut from the same material as the fronts and backs. They are serged along their adjoining edges, the cuffs are serged, are folded and are then blind stitched inside out to form the cuffs. After they have been turned right side out, the sleeves are aligned with the armholes A and are serged to the peripheries of the armholes along seams M and beyond to completely attach the sleeves to the jacket at the armholes.

FIG. 7 illustrates a shoulder piece assembly 80 which comprises a shoulder piece 82 which may be generally described as being triangular and sleeve cap 84, each cut from the same goods as the fronts and backs, and a fusible interliner section 86 secured to the shoulder piece. The shoulder piece and sleeve cap are serged together along seam B and are serged around their edges. The side of the shoulder piece to which the interliner is fused may also be covered with a piece of lining.

As illustrated in FIG. 8, shoulder piece assembly 80 is machine blind stitch tacked to the jacket at several points, these points being generally illustrated at points D in FIG. 5. One of the points D is generally along shoulder seam N, whereas the other two points D lie along the serged seam between the sleeve and the armhole A (along seam M and the continuation thereof). This free-floating shoulder piece assembly tacked only at points D enhances the sweaterlike feel of the jacket 10 of this invention. Further, by positioning seam B inside the sleeve rather than facing outwardly, a neater appearance is given to the jacket.

After the foregoing has been accomplished, the jacket is pressed, the buttons G' are set, the buttonholes are formed and the jacket is ready for sale and use.