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Title:
SHIRT COLLAR AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME
United States Patent 3624664
Abstract:
A shirt collar of the turned-down type having an attachment edge and a seamed outer edge, comprises inner and outer plies and an interlining confined between the plies. A strip of one-sided fusing fabric is stitched and fused to the inner side of the interlining, the strip extending along a longitudinal edge of the interlining adjacent to the seamed outer edge of the collar. The strip serves to prevent puckering of the collar at its seamed outer edge through stretching of the interlining.


Application Number:
05/062950
Publication Date:
11/30/1971
Filing Date:
08/11/1970
Assignee:
John Forsyth Co. Limited (Kitchener, Ontario, CA)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/132, 2/143
International Classes:
A41B3/00; (IPC1-7): A41B3/00; A41B3/06
Field of Search:
2/131,132,143,116
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3170166Shirt collar constructionFebruary 1965Weiss
2436696CollarFebruary 1948La Rose
2048343Method of adhesively binding the turned in edges of an article of apparelJuly 1936Liebowitz
Primary Examiner:
Boler, James R.
Claims:
What I claim as my invention is

1. A shirt collar of the turned down type having an attachment edge and a seamed outer edge, the collar comprising inner and outer plies and an interlining confined between the plies, wherein a strip of one-sided fusing fabric is stitched and fused to the inner side of the interlining, that is to say the side adjacent to the inner ply, the strip extending along a longitudinal edge of the interlining adjacent to the seamed outer edge of the collar, and serving to prevent puckering of the collar at its seamed outer edge through stretching of the interlining.

2. A shirt collar according to claim 1, wherein the inner and outer plies are both seamed to the outer side of the interlining, the collar being turned inside out so that the inner ply extends over the edge of the interlining to cover its inner side and form said seamed outer edge of the collar.

3. A shirt collar according to claim 1, wherein fabric panels, to which stay sets are secured, are stitched to the inner side of the interlining.

4. A shirt collar according to claim 1, wherein fabric panels, to which stay sets are secured, are stitched to the inner side of the interlining, and wherein the inner and outer plies and the panels are stitched to the interlining by a single peripheral seam.

5. The method of making a shirt collar of the turned-down type having an attachment edge and a seamed outer edge, the collar comprising inner and outer plies and an interlining confined between the plies, which method comprises the steps of cutting a fabric blank to form the interlining, stitching to one side of the blank along a longitudinal edge thereof a narrow strip of one-sided fusing fabric, and subsequently fusing the strip to the blank, superimposing the inner and outer plies on the other side of the blank, seaming the plies to the blank, and turning the collar inside out by turning the inner ply over said longitudinal edge to cover said one side and form the seamed outer edge of the collar.

6. The method claimed in claim 5, wherein the strip on one-sided fusing fabric is fused to the blank before the plies are seamed to the blank.

7. The method of claim 5, wherein blank is cut on the bias.

8. The method of making a shirt collar of the turned-down type having an attachment edge and a seamed outer edge, the collar comprising inner and outer plies and an interlining confined between the plies, which method comprises the steps of cutting a fabric blank to form the interlining, stitching to one side of the blank along a longitudinal edge thereof a narrow strip of one-sided fusing fabric, superimposing the inner and outer plies on the other side of the blank, seaming the plies to the blank, turning the collar inside out by turning the inner ply over said longitudinal edge to cover said one side and form the seamed outer edge of the collar, and pressing the collar by the application of heat to fuse the strip of one-sided fusing fabric to the interlining.

9. The method of making a shirt collar of the turned-down type having an attachment edge and a seamed outer edge, the collar comprising inner and outer plies and an interlining confined between the plies, which method comprises the steps of cutting a fabric blank to form the interlining, stitching to one side of the blank along a longitudinal edge thereof a narrow strip of one-sided fusing fabric, laying a pair of fabric panels, to which stray sets are secured, upon said one side of the blank, superimposing the inner and outer plies on the other side of the blank, seaming the panels and the plies to the respective sides of the blank by a single peripheral line of stitches, turning the collar inside out by turning the inner ply over said longitudinal edge to cover said one side and form the seamed outer edge of the collar, and pressing the collar by the application of heat to fuse the strip of one-sided fusing fabric to the interlining.

Description:
This invention relates to shirt collars of the turned down type and to methods of making the same.

Such a collar may comprise a number of plies or panels of fabric, including an interlining to give body to the collar, which are superposed and sewn together. The collar so formed has an attachment edge by which it is stitched to the neckband of a shirt in the case of an attached collar, or to a separate neckband in the case of a separable collar, and a seamed outer edge which is shaped to provide a pair of collar points. As worn, the collar is folded down along the line of the attachment edge to form a cape over the neckband, and encircles the neck of the wearer so that the collar points are adjacent to one another at the front of the wearer.

In the case of soft collars of this type, in order to prevent the collar from losing its shape rapidly, it is usual to provide an interlining of a material having rather more rigidity than the soft, linen or cotton, outer plies of the collar, the interlining being of relatively open-mesh fabric to provide lightness and a degree of flexibility. The interlining is usually cut on the bias, since otherwise there is a tendency for the collar to crease when the wearer puts it on. Such an interlining tends to stretch, however, and the stretching leads to puckering of the collar along its seamed outer edge.

According to the invention, the above-mentioned disadvantages are overcome by providing a strip of one-sided fusing fabric which is stitched and fused to the inner side of the interlining, that is to say, the side adjacent to the inner ply of the collar, the strip extending along the longitudinal edge of the interlining adjacent to the seamed outer edge of the collar.

A one-sided fusing fabric is a fabric which has been chemically treated on one side only so that that side of the fabric may be caused to adhere to another, suitably prepared, fabric by the application of heat and pressure.

The method of making a collar in accordance with the invention comprises essentially the following steps:

1. cutting a fabric blank, preferably on the bias, to form the interlining;

2. stitching a narrow strip of one-sided fusing fabric to one side of the blank along a longitudinal edge thereof, the strip being fused to the blank subsequently;

3. superimposing the inner and outer plies on the other side of the blank, and seaming the plies to the blank;

4. turning the collar inside out by turning the inner ply over said longitudinal edge to cover said other side and form the seamed outer edge of the collar.

The strip of one-sided fusing fabric may be fused to the interlining either before or after the plies are seamed to the blank. Thus, the fusing fabric may be fused to the blank by the application of heat and pressure immediately after it is stitched to the blank, or alternatively in a final collar-pressing operation.

One embodiment of the invention as applied to a composite, soft collar of the turned-down type, will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of an interlining and a strip of one-sided fusing fabric;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view showing the components of the collar;

FIG. 3 shows the components of FIG. 2 in superposed relation, at a stage during the making of the collar; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the finished collar, parts of the collar components being broken away to reveal the construction of the collar.

As shown in FIG. 4, the collar 1 has an inner, attachment edge 2, by which it may be sewn to a neckband, and a seamed, outer edge consisting of a slightly curved, longitudinal edge portion 3 and two slightly divergent, short edge portions 4 and 5. The edge portion 3 defines with the edge portions 4 and 5 a pair of collar points 6, 7, which when the collar is worn meet at the front of the wearer's neck.

The collar is essentially of composite construction, comprising inner and outer plies, which may be linen or cotton cloth, and an interlining confined between the plies. Details of the construction will become apparent from the following description of the method by which the collar is made.

In making the collar, a fabric blank 8 is cut on the bias from an open-mesh lining material having a permanent press resin finish, so as to form the interlining. To one side of the interlining is stitched a narrow strip of lightweight, one-sided fusing fabric 9, the strip extending along one longitudinal edge 10 of the interlining and being trimmed so that its edge coincides exactly with the edge 10. The seam of attachment 11 of the strip 9 to the interlining 8 lies as close to the longitudinal edge 10 as possible.

The strip 9 is subsequently fused to the interlining, and this may be done at any time after the strip is stitched in place, but preferably during the final pressing of the collar.

A pair of fabric panels 12, 13, to which stay sets or stiffeners 14, 15, are secured by stitching, are laid upon said one side of the blank or interlining 8 at the ends. The stitching of the stay sets 14 and 15 to the panels 12 and 13 is such as to permit a small amount of longitudinal movement or play of the stays relative to the panels. The inner ply 16 and the outer ply 17, having been cut to the required shape, are superimposed on the other side of the interlining 8, the outer ply 17 being next to the interlining. The superimposed plies 16 and 17, and the panels 12 and 13, are seamed to the respective sides of the interlining 8 by a single peripheral line of stitches, or seam, 18 to form the composite structure illustrated in FIG. 3.

The collar is next turned inside out in the known manner by turning the inner ply 16 over the longitudinal edge 10 and the fabric strip 9 so as to cover said one side of the interlining and form the seamed outer edge of the collar. FIG. 4 illustrates the collar after it has been so turned. The collar is finally pressed by the application of heat and pressure. During the pressing operation the strip 9 becomes fused to the interlining 8, although as previously mentioned, the strip might have been fused to the interlining at any stage subsequent to its being stitched thereon.

In its final form the collar comprises inner and outer plies, 16, 17, an interlining 8 confined between the plies, a narrow strip of one-sided fusing fabric 9 stitched and fused to one side of the interlining and extending along a longitudinal edge 10 thereof adjacent to the seamed outer edge of the collar, a pair of fabric panels 12, 13, to which stay sets or stiffeners 14, 15, are secured by stitching, the fabric panels being interposed between the interlining and the inner ply 16, and the composite assembly being stitched together by a single peripheral line of stitches 18. It will be seen that the seamed outer edge of the collar is formed by the collar's having been turned inside out so that the inner ply 16 extends over the edge of the interlining to cover its inner side. The collar is finally adapted for use by sewing it to the neckband of a shirt, or to a separate neckband, at its attachment edge.