Title:
AN ELASTIC PUSH-PULL BATTING PRACTICE TYPE EXERCISE DEVICE
United States Patent 3618942


Abstract:
A device for exercising and strengthening the wrists. The device consists of a bat or club, an anchor board which is securely fastened to a wall or column, and a length of a strong elastic rope or band which is attached at one end to any one of a number of points on the anchor board and at the other end to any one of a number of points on the bat or club.



Inventors:
Bates, Robert H. (Akron, OH)
Klipstein, Wesley (Akron, OH)
Application Number:
05/025784
Publication Date:
11/09/1971
Filing Date:
04/06/1970
Assignee:
ROBERT H. BATES
WESLEY KLIPSTEIN
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/55, 473/229, 473/457
International Classes:
A63B21/04; A63B69/00; A63B21/055; (IPC1-7): A63B23/00
Field of Search:
273/186A,191R,26R,26B,29R,67,72,73R,63R,35,54R,40 272
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3400933Golf practicing deviceSeptember 1968Heiser
3083016Golf indoor practice deviceMarch 1963Sumegi
2848234Golf swing-conditionerAugust 1958Brandon
2655378Golf instruction apparatusOctober 1953Sheffer
2455707Golf instructorDecember 1948Sheffer



Primary Examiner:
Pinkham, Richard C.
Assistant Examiner:
Browne, William R.
Claims:
What is claimed is

1. An exercise device for conditioning and strengthening the wrists, comprising:

2. The exercise device according to claim 1 wherein said anchoring means includes means for securing said tether end at any one of a plurality of vertically spaced positions.

3. The exercise device according to claim 2 wherein said anchoring means includes a board having a plurality of eyebolts at vertically spaced locations thereon.

4. The exercise device according to claim 1 wherein said tether comprises a length of rubber rope having snap fasteners at both ends.

Description:
This invention relates to an improved wrist and arm exercise device.

Numerous exercise devices for strengthening the wrist have been known but these devices have normally been limited to exercising in connection with a particular sport or activity. Many of the prior art exercising devices have also been of complicated construction, increasing the cost of the device, and creating many potentials for defects.

It is the primary object of our invention to provide an exercise device which may be used to develop and strengthen the wrists, hand, and forearms and arms which is capable of providing the proper development thereof in relation to a number of different sporting activities. It is also an object of the present invention to provide a wrist exercising device which is of simple, durable and therefore inexpensive and trouble free construction. A further object of the invention is the provision of a wrist exercising device which is suitable for use either in gymnasiums or private homes, and which is adjustable in several manners to provide exercises of different natures for strengthening different muscles.

In accordance with the principles of our invention, the above objectives are accomplished by providing an exercise device in the form of a bat, or club which is attached to the bat or club at anyone of a plurality of fixed supports by a rubber or other elastic rope and anchored to an upright device at any one of a plurality of fixed supports to vary the direction of tension of the elastic rope for muscle exercise by movement of the bat or club.

The above and other objects and advantages to the invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following specification and the accompanying drawing wherein there is shown a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing the use of the device of our invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of a first embodiment of the exercise bat of the device of our invention;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the lines 3--3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the second embodiment of the exercise bat or club;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along the lines 5--5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary elevational view showing the rope retaining clips and the method of securing the rope thereto;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of a modified form of the anchor board used with the exercise bat of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of a further modification of the anchor board;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the anchor of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view showing the use of the exercise club of FIG. 4;

FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of a third embodiment of the exercise club, this embodiment simulating a bowling ball;

FIG. 12 is a front elevational view of the embodiment of FIG. 11; and

FIG. 13 is a perspective view showing the use of the embodiment of FIG. 11.

As will be seen from FIG. 1, the exercise device of our invention consists, essentially, of a bat or club 10, an anchor board 12 which is secured to a wall or other support, and a resilient tether or rope 14 which may be attached to the club 10 at any of a number of points and to the anchor board 12 at any of a number of points. The bat 10, which may be formed of any suitable material such as wood, plastic, or metal, has a body portion 16 usually of square cross section and a tapered and rounded handle portion 18 which terminates in an enlarged flanged or ball-like end 20. Attachment points for the tether 14 are provided by means of eyebolts 22-26 at spaced intervals along one side of the body portion 16 and by an eyebolt 28 in the end of the body portion 16 of the club 10. The anchor board 12 consists of a rectangular board 30 which is rigidly secured of a wall by suitable screws or bolts 32. Eyebolts 34-42 are provided in spaced vertical relation along the board 30 to provide attachment points for the tether 14. The tether 14 may be formed of a length of rubber rope 44 which is threaded at each end through the eye 46 of a conventional snap hook 48. The end 50 of the rope 44 is doubled back to lie parallel with the rope 44 and is tightly clamped thereto by a metal clip 52 or other rope securing means.

The exercise device described above is employed as follows:

One end of the tether 14 is snapped onto one of the eyebolts 22-28 of the bat 10, a beginner normally using the eyebolt 22 closest to the handle 18 and progressing to the successively more remote eyebolts as the strength of his wrists increases. The opposite end of the tether 14 is snapped onto one of the eyebolts 34-42 of the anchor board, the particular eyebolt chosen being determined by the particular sports activity for which the wrists are being strengthened. For example, when using the device as an exerciser in connection with baseball, the tether 14 is snapped onto the ring 36 so that the tension is applied along an upward angle, as shown in FIG. 1. When the device is being used for golf exercise, the tether 14 would be fastened to one of the eyebolts 40 or 42 at the lower end of the anchor board 12. Naturally the person using the device takes a position adjacent the board 30 so he can swing the bat away from such anchor board.

To develop strong wrists and forearms, the user moves the club 10 through the natural arc through which, for example, a baseball bat would be swung. When he has swung the club 10 sufficiently to elongate the tether 14 approximately 20 to 30 inches, he holds the club 10 stationary, the stretched tether 14 applying tension to the wrist and arm which is resisted by the muscles.

FIGS. 4 and 5 illustrate a modification of the club or bat which is especially suitable for tennis exercises. In this embodiment, the club has a body portion 54 usually of square cross section and a handle portion 56 of octagonal cross section. The club of FIG. 4 is shorter than the club of FIG. 2 and also usually would be lighter in weight. Eyebolts 58-64 are provided along one side and the end of the body portion 54 of the club and are used in the same manner as the eyebolts of the previously described embodiment. The octagonal shape of the handle 56 allows the user to grip the club in a manner similar to the grip used on a tennis racket and thus allows the natural feel to be maintained.

The embodiment of FIGS. 4 and 5 may be used to simulate the various tennis strokes such as forehand, backhand, etc. As shown in FIG. 10, the forehand swing is simulated by attaching one end of the tether 14 to one of the eyebolts 58-64 of the club and attaching the other end of the tether to one of the upper eyebolts 34, 36 of the anchor board 12. The club is held in a generally vertical position and moved through a natural forehand swing away from the anchor board until the tether 14 is stretched sufficiently to apply tension to the user's wrist, arm and shoulder muscles. Other tennis swings may be practiced by using appropriate attachment points for the tether and by holding the club in a manner duplicating the position of a tennis racket.

Where it is impractical to permanently anchor the board 12 to a wall, the modified embodiment of this board shown in FIG. 7 may be used. In this embodiment, a rectangular board 66 having a plurality of eyebolts 68 at vertically spaced intervals along its length is clamped to a column or other structural member 70 by means of U-bolts or other clamps 72. The board of this embodiment is used in the same manner as is the anchor board 12 of the previously described embodiment. Or, the eyebolts 68 could be directly secured to the column or post 70, as in FIG. 8.

FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate another modification of the anchor board. This modification is especially suitable for wrist exercise by golfers. In this embodiment there is provided a vertical post 74 which may be a wooden post or a length of pipe partly embedded in the ground. Eyebolts 76 and 78 are provided along one side of and secured to the post 74 to provide anchor points for the tether 14. A pair of C-shaped spring clips may be provided on the opposite side of the column or post 74 for holding the exercise club when the same is not in use.

FIGS. 11-13 illustrate a third embodiment of our invention which is used to practice delivery of a bowling ball. In this embodiment, the club consists of a disc 82 which has a surface 84 which simulates a portion of a bowling ball and is provided with thumb and finger holes 86 and 88 to permit the disc 82 to be grasped like a bowling ball. An eye 90 is attached to one edge of the disc 82. As is shown in FIG. 12, this embodiment is used by attaching the tether to the eye 90 and to one of the lower eyebolts 38-42 of the anchor board 12. The user grasps the disc by the holes 86 and 88, stands facing away from the anchor board 12 and swings the disc 82 through an arc simulating the delivery of a bowling ball. When the tether has stretched sufficiently to tension the wrist and arm, the user holds the disc 82 stationary for a short period of time and then releases it and repeats the exercise.

It will be understood that changes and additions may be made to the embodiments of our invention described herein without departing from the spirit of the invention. For example, the handle portion 18 or 56 of the club may be provided with a leather or rubber wrapping to provide a comfortable and nonslippery surface. Also, the tether 14 may be made of other materials than the rubber rope 44. It is contemplated that this tether 14 may be made of coil springs attached to the eyes 46 of the clips 48 and to one another by a length of flexible rope or chain. In such an arrangement, a rubber tubing is provided to cover the chain and the springs. Naturally for any exercise action the user adjusts his position so that the tether can be fully or partly relaxed and then the bat or article is moved to tension the tether and provide the desired exercise action for one's arms, wrists, etc. The weight of the club or article being grasped may simulate the weight of the club or article used in the sport being practiced. As these and other changes maybe made in the described embodiments of the invention, reference should be had to the accompanying claims in determining the true scope of the invention.