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Title:
SAIL BOAT
United States Patent 3601076
Abstract:
An inflated annular tube (e.g. a truck tire inner tube) is clamped between upper and lower parts of a sail and rudder carrying frame. Each such frame part comprises a pair of laterally spaced longitudinal members. The lower longitudinal members include upwardly turned forward portions which meet and are secured to the forward end portions of the upper longitudinal members. Tension members are vertically interconnected between the upper and lower longitudinal members at the rear of the frame. Crosstie members extending between the longitudinal members support a sail mast generally at a location intermediate the ends of the boat. A rudder is supported by a crosstie at the rear of the boat.


Inventors:
MEEKS WARD W
Application Number:
04/834279
Publication Date:
08/24/1971
Filing Date:
06/18/1969
Assignee:
WARD W. MEEKS
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
441/41, 441/44
International Classes:
B63B7/08; B63B35/73; (IPC1-7): B63B7/00; B63B35/00
Field of Search:
9/2I,2,1,312 114
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3390656One-man sailboat1968-07-02Flowers
3139057Iceboat conversion kit1964-06-30Black
2674753Boat1954-04-13Wood
Foreign References:
GB878286A1961-09-27
Primary Examiner:
Blix, Trygve M.
Claims:
What is claimed is

1. Apparatus for use with an inflated annular tubular ring to form a sail boat, comprising:

2. Apparatus according to claim 1, further comprising a rudder assembly including a rudder post, a control handle at one end of said post and a rudder member at the opposite end of said post; means on said frame rearwardly of said mast for supporting the rudder post in a generally vertical position relative to the horizontal tubular ring with the control handle disposed upwardly and the rudder member disposed downwardly.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2, wherein said mast includes a lower portion which depends from said frame, vertically below said tubular ring, and said apparatus further includes stabilizer panel means positionable on the lower portion of said mast.

4. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein each lower side member has an upwardly turned forward portion which extends upwardly to the upper side member on its side of the said boat, to constitute at least a portion of said vertical tie means, and the apparatus also includes means for connecting said upwardly turned portions to the upper side members where they meet.

5. Apparatus according to claim 4, wherein the mast is located between the two upper side members and rearwardly of the upwardly turned forward portions of the lower side members, and the mast and said upper turned forward portions are spaced relative to each other and to the inflated ring such that an arcuate portion of the ring is disposed forwardly of the mast, with a rear surface portion of said ring being contiguous the mast, and with forward surface portions of the ring being contiguous the two upwardly turned forward portions of the lower side members.

6. Apparatus according to claim 4, wherein said vertical tie means include tension members interconnected vertically between the rearward portions of the upper and lower frame means.

7. Apparatus according to claim 1, further comprising skate support members secured to the lower frame means and having forward end portions, and ice skate means at the forward end of each such support.

8. Apparatus according to claim 7, further comprising a rear skate assembly including a vertical post, a control handle at one end of said post and a skate at the opposite end of said post; means on said frame rearwardly of the mast for supporting the skate post in a generally vertical position relative to the horizontal tubular ring, with the control handle disposed upwardly and the skate disposed downwardly.

9. Apparatus according to claim 7, wherein said skate supports are elongated pieces of tubing, commencing at the opposite rear corners of the boat and each extending diagonally across the boat to the opposite front corner of the boat and then forwardly therefrom to a position forwardly of the boat.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to sail boats and particularly to small sail boats built around an inflated inner tube for a motor vehicle tire.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Walters, U.S. Pat. No. 1,625,579; Jantzen, U.S. Pat. No. 3,037,220 and Flowers, U.S. Pat. No. 3,390,656 relate to small boats having a small float body and an attachment for converting the float into a sail boat.

The float used by Walters is constructed from balsa wood or the like, and is of sectional construction so that it can be collapsed into a small package for transportation and storage when not in use. A disadvantage of this type of boat is that a substantial volume of buoyant material is needed to provide the necessary buoyant force. Hence, even when collapsed the buoyant body occupies a considerable amount of space.

Jantzen, U.S. Pat. No. 3,037,220 discloses the use of one piece, noncollapsible float. If this type of float is made small in size, it is not possible for the user to actually get up onto the boat. If the float is made large enough in size for the user to ride it, it occupies a large amount of space and becomes difficult to handle and store.

Flowers, U.S. Pat. No. 3,390,656 uses an inflatable ring-type float. Hence, during periods of nonuse the float body can be deflated, rendering it easy to handle and store. A disadvantage of this particular boat disclosed by this patent is that the only frame provided is located within the open center of the float, and such frame is lashed onto the float. Unless an extremely large ring is used it would not be possible for the user to actually sit himself on a frame portion of the boat. Also, it is believed that the lashing method of sail assembly attachment would afford insufficient stability.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The sail boat of the present invention is built around an inner tube for a pneumatic tire or a similar inflatable annular ring device. Hence, during periods of nonuse the flotation body can be deflated and folded into a relatively small package for easy transportation and storage.

The sail boat of the invention also comprises a skeleton-type support frame which is composed of a plurality of tubular frame members which have good structural characteristics when assembled and which occupy a minimum amount of space when disassembled. The frame members are assembled into upper and lower frame parts of substantial area, and the inner tube or other inflated ring float member is securely clamped in place between the upper and lower frame parts. A sail assembly is supported by rigid crosstie members at a location intermediate the length of the boat, and a crosstie member supports a rudder at the rear end of the boat.

The subject invention primarily relates to the construction of the support frame and the relationship of each of the frame parts, and of the sail assembly parts, to the inflated flotation member.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

FIG. 1 is a pictorial view taken from above and looking towards one side and the stern of an embodiment of the sail boat of the present invention, with the various frame parts being shown by solid lines and the inflated flotation ring and the sail being depicted by broken lines;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the sail boat, with the sail mast shown in section; and

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the boat, with the upper portion of the sail mast and the sail omitted, and with the inflated flotation member depicted by broken lines.

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of an iceboat embodiment of the said boat according to the invention; and

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of a runner attachment for the iceboat.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The sail boat of the invention comprises an inflatable ring-type inflation device 10, e.g. an inner tube for a truck tire. The tube 10 is tightly clamped between upper and lower parts 12, 14 of a frame which serves to stabilize a sail assembly 16 in position on the tube 10.

The upper part of the frame comprises a U-shaped forward portion 18 fabricated from thin walled tubing, such as electrical wire conduit, for example. The member 18 has a forwardly directed bight portion 20 and rearwardly directed side portions 22, 24. Longitudinal stringers 26, 28 are telescopically received at their forward's ends in the after portions of the side portions 22, 24.

The lower frame part 14 is composed of a pair of longitudinally extending tubular members (or stringers) 30, 32 having upwardly turned forward portions 34, 36. In the preferred embodiment the upwardly turned portions 34, 36 side lap the side portions 22, 24 of member 18, in the regions of the telescopic engagement of such parts 22, 24 with the forward end portions 26, 28. At the meeting locations of the members 34, 22, 24 on the one side of the boat, and the members 24, 36, 28 on the opposite side of the boat, a transverse tie bolt (or an equivalent type fastener) 38 extends through all three members and secures them together. The transversely curving bight 18 and the upwardly curving portions 34, 36 of the members 30, 32 help provide the appearance of a "bow" at the forward end of the boat.

The upwardly turned forward portions 34, 36 of the lower side members 30, 32 constitute vertical ties between the two frame parts 12, 14 at the forward or bow end of the boat. Vertically extending tension members, shown in the form of wires 40, 42, are interconnected between the vertically spaced end portions of the paired members 26, 30 and 28, 32 at the stern end of the boat. During assembly the inflated tube 10 is sandwiched between frame parts 12, 14 and then the vertical ties 40, 42 are applied and tightened so that the tube 10 is tightly held or clamped between the frame parts 12, 14.

The sail assembly is supported by a pair of crossties 46, 48, shown in the form of wood beams, e.g. 2 inch by 3 inch material. The lower longitudinal members 30, 32 extend through parallel openings or passageways formed in member 48. Member 46 is spaced vertically above member 48 and also includes drilled passageways for receiving the forward end portions of frame members 26, 28. Screws, pins, or merely a tight frictional fit, may be used for fixing the beams 46, 48 in position relative to the frame members 26, 28 and 30, 32.

By way of typical and therefore nonlimitive example, a single upper crosstie 50 may be provided at the stern of the boat to support a rudder 52. The crosstie 50 is essentially identical to crosstie 46 and is secured to the members 26, 28 in the same manner. Rubber or plastic tips 54 may be provided at each free end of each piece of tubing 26, 28, 30, 32.

The sail assembly 16 is shown to comprise a mast 56, a main sail 58, a jib sail 60, and a support and control arm 62 for sail 58. The jib sail 60 includes a tie 64 by which it is secured in place by being tied to frame part 20. The mast 56 comprises a lower portion 66 which extends through aligned vertical openings formed in the crossties 46, 48. Here again, bolts, screws, cross pins, or merely a tight frictional fit, are employed for holding the lower post portions 66 fixed to relative to the crossties 46, 48. The lower portions 66 of the mast 56 depends below the crosstie 48 and supports at its lower end a stabilizer panel or centerboard 68, shown in the form of a trapezoidal panel 68. Panel 68 is located substantially in the longitudinal center plane of the boat.

The upper portion of mast part 66 projects upwardly above crosstie 46 and includes joint means 67 at its upper end for receiving the lower end portion of the mast section 68 to which the sails 58, 60 are secured. The joint 67 between mast portions 66, 68 may be of a type which permits no rotation between parts 66 and 68. Arm 62 is not connected to the mast, and the sail fabric forms a hinge between it and the mast part 68. Preferably, the upper portion 68 of the mast 56 is of sectional construction so that it can be dismantled into pieces which are individually no longer than the longest component of the frame.

The rudder 56 is shown to comprise a post 70 having a vertical portion which depends below crosstie 50 and a horizontal handle portion 72 which curves inwardly of the tube 10 from above crosstie 50. A rudder panel 74 is carried at the lower end of post 70, in position to lay in the water below the tube 10. The post 70 extends through a vertical opening in crossties 50, and is rotatable in such vertical opening.

As best shown by FIG. 2, the relative spacing of the upwardly turning forward portions 34, 36 of frame members 30, 32, and the lower portion 66 of the mast 56, is such that the forward arcuate portion of the tube 10 is firmly secured between these members. The mast part 66 contacts, or is contiguous to, a radially inner surface portion of tube 10, and the frame parts 34, 36 contact or are contiguous to radially outer surface portions of tube 10 which are annularly spaced outwardly from and on opposite sides of radial line on which post 66 lies. At the stern of the boat the rudder post 70 contacts or is contiguous to a radially outer surface portion of the tube 10. Thus, the tube 10 is vertically trapped between the upper and lower frame parts 12, 14, and is horizontally trapped between the vertical tubing members 34, 36, 66 and 70.

FIGS. 4 and 5 relate to a modified form of sail boat which is adapted for use on ice, i.e. it is an iceboat.

In this embodiment a second lower crosstie 76 is provided at the stern of the boat. First and second skate supports 78 and 80 are bolted to the crossties 48, 76 in a crossing fashion. In other words, support 78 extends diagonally across the boat from one end of the lower rear crosstie 76 to the opposite end of the lower front crosstie 48. Skate support 80 extends from the opposite end of lower rear crosstie 76 back across to the second end of the front lower crosstie 48. A single vertical bolt 82 may be used for securing the supports 78, 80 to the crossties 48, 78 at the four points where such supports 78, 80 underlie the end portions of the crossties 48, 76. Also, a vertical bolt 84 may be used to secure the supports 78, 80 together where they cross below the inflated body 10 of the boat.

As best shown by FIG. 5, each support 78, 80 may be a length of pipe having an elbow fitting 86 at its forward end from which depends a short nipple 88 which is secured to a skate blade 90.

In this form of the invention the rudder 77 is replaced by a rotatable rear skate 92. The remaining portions of the boat remain unchanged from what is shown in FIGS. 1-3 in connection with a water boat. The rear skate 92 is located at the end of a vertical control shaft which extends through aligned vertical openings provided in the rear crossties 50, 76, and such support post includes a control handle 54 at its upper end.

In both forms of the invention a plywood board or the like can be slid sideways into a position between the upper surfaces of lower frame members 30, 32 and the lower surface of the tube 10, to serve as a bottom. If necessary, the rear portion of the centerboard or stabilizer 68 could be extended upwardly and connected to such board to provide rear support for the centerboard 68. This could be simply done by cutting an opening or notch in the floorboard and having the upwardly extending rear portion of the centerboard 68 include a tongue which fits into such opening or notch.