Title:
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FORMING A FILAMENT PACKAGE
United States Patent 3589409


Abstract:
A filament package comprising a closed flexible sack containing cut filament packaged essentially parallel to each other and essentially normal to the length of the sack. In packaging the cut filament within the flexible sack, the filament is fed into an opened end of the sack with the filaments essentially in parallel relationship to each other and essentially normal to the length of the sack while maintaining a movable temporarily closed end in the sack between the permanent ends thereof. The movement of the intermediate temporarily closed end is coordinated with the filament feed so that cut filament controllably moves into and within the sack and into contact with cut filament already properly aligned therein without incident. The package of the invention provides many advantages over conventional brush or brush-type fiber packages in cost, handling and use by, for example, brush or artificial Christmas tree makers.



Inventors:
Shaw, Gilbert (Middlebury, VT)
Anderson Jr., Charles H. (Shoreham, VT)
Application Number:
04/714597
Publication Date:
06/29/1971
Filing Date:
03/20/1968
Assignee:
GILBERT SHAW
CHARLES H. ANDERSON JR.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
53/459, 53/475, 53/494, 53/503, 53/535, 53/536, 53/570, 141/192, 141/317
International Classes:
B65B1/06; B65B19/34; (IPC1-7): B65B1/06
Field of Search:
206/56AC,46M,31A 312
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3262244Particle stopper apparatus for form and fill machine1966-07-26Cutler et al.
3152690Dispensing containers1964-10-13Storey
2767536Collector system for pirns1956-10-23Forkel
1791344Magazine carton for vending machines1931-02-03Bendheim
0967545N/A1910-08-16



Primary Examiner:
Condon, Theron E.
Assistant Examiner:
Spruill, Robert L.
Claims:
What we claim is

1. The process for forming a package of cut filament contained in a flexible sack comprising: opening one end of the sack, feeding cut filaments into the sack through the opened end thereof essentially parallel to one another and normal to the length of the sack, externally maintaining a temporary end in the sack between the permanent ends thereof, moving said external temporary end away from the opened sack end and toward the other sack end as cut filament is fed into the sack, and maintaining the parallel relationship of the cut filaments within the sack during movement of the temporary end toward the other sack end.

2. Apparatus for packaging filaments in a flexible sack so that the filaments are maintained in parallel relationship comprising: a hopper adapted to receive horizontally aligned filaments cut to a predetermined length, means for affixing an opened end of the flexible sack to said hopper, movable means for temporarily closing the sack between the permanent ends thereof, and means for controllably moving said movable temporary closing means as cut filaments are fed from said hopper into the sack to maintain the level of filaments in said hopper.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2 wherein said movable temporary closing means includes a table having a slit therein through which the sack is passed, said slit closing the sack intermediate the ends thereof with said table temporarily forming a movable sack bottom.

4. Apparatus according to claim 3 further including means located in said hopper to detect the filament level therein, said detecting means being connected to said control means to move said table until the level of the filaments in said hopper falls below a predetermined level.

5. Apparatus according to claim 2 further including indicating means responsive to said movable temporary closing means for indicating when the sack is full.

6. Apparatus according to claim 2 further including a bayonet insertable through said hopper to maintain the filament level therein while a filled flexible sack is exchanged for an empty flexible sack.

7. Apparatus for packaging filaments in a flexible sack so that the filaments are maintained in parallel relationship comprising: a hopper adapted to receive horizontally aligned filaments cut to a predetermined length, means for affixing an opened end of the flexible sack to said hopper, a table positioned directly beneath said hopper having a slit therein through which the sack is passed for temporarily closing the sack and forming a moveable sack bottom intermediate its ends, means for moving said table away from said hopper as cut filaments are fed therefrom into the sack to maintain the level of filaments in said hopper, and means for moving said table toward said hopper after the filled sack is removed therefrom to ready the apparatus for another filament-feeding cycle.

8. Apparatus according to claim 7 wherein said table is slidably mounted on a shaft; and wherein said last-said means has a release connected to said table and said motivating means for disengaging said table from said motivating means so that said table can be slidably moved toward said hopper to ready said apparatus for another filament-feeding cycle.

9. The process for filling a flexible sack with cut filament comprising: temporarily affixing one end of the sack open, feeding cut filaments into said open end in essentially parallel relationship to one another and normal to the length of the sack, while externally inducing a temporary descending sack bottom between the permanent sack bottom and the open end by constraining the sack in a slit in a table which is movable at a controlled rate in a descending manner.

10. The process for filling a flexible sack with essentially parallel cut filaments according to claim 9 comprising: stopping the downward controlled motion of said external descending table and accompanying temporary sack bottom when the cut and essentially parallel filaments reach a predetermined level above the open end of the sack.

11. The process for filling a flexible sack with cut filaments comprising: temporarily affixing one end of the sack open, vertically feeding cut filaments into the sack through the open end thereof essentially parallel to one another and normal to the length of the sack from a hopper positioned thereabove, externally inducing a temporary descending sack bottom between the permanent sack bottom and the open end by constraining the sack in a slit in a table which is movable at a controlled rate in a descending manner, moving said slit- bearing table away from the opened sack end toward the permanent sack bottom as cut filaments are fed vertically into the sack to maintain the parallel relationship of cut filaments therewithin, and stopping the descending movement of said slit bearing table when the filament level falls below a predetermined level in the hopper.

12. The process for filling a flexible sack with essentially parallel cut filaments according to claim 11 comprising: inserting a bayonet-type knife between the hopper and the open end of the sack to support surplus cut and essentially parallel fibers in the hopper after the sack is filled.

13. The process for filling a flexible sack with essentially parallel cut filaments according to claim 12 comprising: moving the slit-bearing table in an ascending manner to a position immediately beneath the hopper after removal of a filled sack.

Description:
This invention relates to a package for filaments and to its manufacture and use, and particularly to a package containing cut brush or brush-type synthetic fibers or filaments which provides many advantages over conventional brush or brush-type fiber packages in cost, handling and use by, for example, brush or artificial Christmas tree makers.

Prior to this invention, cut filament fibers for usage in articles, such as brushes and brush-type synthetic tree branches, have been packaged in bundles by constraining them intermittently along their length with strings or elastic bands; by constraining them along their length with shrunken cellulose or vinyl type tubing as an enclosing medium; or by constraining them along their length with paper or plastic film spirally wound around the fiber bundles.

With the prior packaging techniques the maximum bundle diameter has been limited to about 3 inches or less in order to permit a user of the bundle, such as an operator of a brushmaking machine, to pick up the bundle in one hand and slit it open with the other hand. Consequently, brush makers have been obligated to open a multitude of small bundles to keep the filament feed boxes of their brushmaking machines filled. The cost of so doing has been great.

In forming the cut filaments which have been packaged by the prior packaging techniques, moreover, the output of cut filaments per man-hour has been limited by the number of long filament hanks having 3 inch diameters or less which an operator of an extrusion machine could paperwrap or place in shrunk film per hour. Further, cutting costs have been dictated by the number of small bundle cuts a cutter could cut in 1 hour from the aforementioned long hanks. Still further, shipping department labor costs have been dictated by the number of small cuts a shipper could stack in a carton per hour. In addition, packaging materials of the spirally wound type and the shrunken type have appreciable tare weight with attendant high costs for materials and shipping.

Objects and advantages of the invention will be set forth in part hereinafter and in part will be obvious herefrom or may be learned by practice with the invention, the same being realized and attained by means of the steps, methods, combinations, and improvements pointed out in the appended claims.

The invention consists in the novel steps, methods and combinations herein shown and described.

Among the objects of this invention is the provision of a package for filaments which lowers packaging, handling and shipping costs and which facilitates the packaging, handling and shipping of filaments. The invention also reduces the costs of filament-packaging material per package. The invention further provides a package which contains a relatively large quantity of filaments wherein such packaged filaments can be readily utilized. Another object of this invention is to reduce the cost of the filament-packaging material. Yet another object of this invention is to reduce the tare weight of the packaging material, thereby reducing shipping costs.

A further object of this invention is to provide brush manufacturers and other manufacturers with larger packages of cut filaments to reduce the effort required to feed filament into their brush-making or other operations. Another object is to provide brush manufacturers and other manufacturers with packages of cut filaments which can be readily utilized in brushes or other products.

Another object is to provide a new and improved method of and apparatus for packaging large quantities of cut filaments than heretofore envisioned or thought feasible.

In accordance with the present invention the package comprises a closed flexible sack containing cut filament packaged essentially parallel to each other and essentially normal to the longest dimension or length of the sack. The sack is sufficiently loose with respect to the cut filaments to permit filling and emptying thereof by gravity alone. To provide large quantities of cut filaments per package the package is, moreover, many times the length of the filaments.

Surprisingly and unexpectedly the filaments within the sack remain essentially parallel to each other during transit, such as by truck or rail, despite the constant jostling that they are exposed to. Apparently the individual filaments in the relatively loose sacks are constantly returned to parallel disposition by forces imparted by contact with adjacent filaments. This effect is apparent during filling of the sacks. Some filaments for one reason or other are not quite parallel to their companion filaments. These nonparallel filaments are easily brought to parallel disposition by lightly tapping the filled sack surface with the edge of one's hand such that the hand edge is parallel to the axes of the packaged filaments.

The flexible sacks can be made from any flexible film or sheet. Such film or sheet can be formed from polyethylene, polypropylene, vinyl chloride or other thermoplastics. The sacks can also be made of paper or laminates of several materials. Preferably the sacks, however, are transparent to facilitate inspection and identification of contained filaments.

Sacks of a rectangular gusset construction heat-sealed at one end have been found to be particularly useful. When filled such sacks can be closed at the other end by a variety of means including heat-sealing, taping or stapling.

In packaging the filaments within the flexible sack, the cut filament is fed into a fixed open end of the sack with the filaments essentially in parallel relationship to each other and essentially normal to the length of the sack while maintaining a movable temporarily closed bottom in the sack between the permanent ends thereof. The movement of the intermediate temporarily closed bottom is coordinated with the filament feed so that filaments controllably move into and within the sack and into contact with the filaments already properly aligned therewithin without incident. As more filaments are fed into the sack the intermediate temporarily closed bottom is moved toward the lower permanently closed end of the sack. The sack is removed from its opened top point of fixture and that end is closed by heat sealing or other means. When the sack is filled and closed the package is ready for shipping to and use by, for example, brush makers. In accordance with the foregoing the method of the invention for filling the sacks comprises:

a. Adding cut filament to a hopper in vertical disposition that opens at the bottom into a flexible sack temporarily affixed to the lower lips of the hopper. The cut filament can be added in parallel relationship to the hopper manually; by rotary cutting of filament as it emerges from a filament producing unit so that the filament enters the hopper in general parallel relationship; by guillotine cutting of filament bundles as they are passed in generally parallel relationship under the guillotine in such manner that they enter the hopper while retaining their generally parallel relationship.

b. Retaining the flexible sack in a slit of a table which is movable in descending and ascending manner. The slit closes the bag at each of its positions thereby giving the sack a movable bottom in addition to its lower permanently closed end and the table provides a suitable support surface for the filaments as they are fed into the sack.

c. Causing the slit and the movable temporary sack bottom induced by the slit to descend when the filament in the hopper rises above a predetermined level which permits the filaments to controllably enter and move downward into the attached sack in parallel relationship.

d. Causing the slit and the attendant temporary sack bottom to stop their downward movement when the filament level in the hopper falls below a predetermined level.

e. Causing the slit-containing table to actuate an indicator when the table has fallen a predetermined distance.

f. Moving a bayonet through the hopper at right angles to the filaments to support cut filament in the hopper while the filament filled sack is removed from the hopper after the indicator is actuated and an empty sack is affixed to the bottom of the hopper.

g. Closing the upper end of the filled sack by means of adhesive tape, heat-sealing, stapling, etc.

h. Releasing the slit-containing table from its motivating rack in order that said table can be raised to the bottom of the hopper in order that the cycle can be repeated and the filled sack be made ready for shipment.

The package of the invention can be readily used by, for example, a brushmaker, by positioning the package in a stock or feed box of a brushmaking machine which has vertical guides, a base for supporting the cut filament, and an open top. The bottom end of the upright package is then sufficiently opened so that the cut filaments retain their parallel relationship to each other as the sack is moved upwardly about such filaments. With the sack removed the cut filament rests within the vertical guides in a parallel relationship ready to be formed into tufts for brushes.

The accompanying drawings referred to herein and constituting a part hereof illustrate one embodiment of the apparatus and together with the description serve to explain the principles of the invention.

In The Drawings:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of one such embodiment of the apparatus for carrying out the method of the invention illustrating a hopper feed to which a flexible sack can be temporarily affixed, a table containing a slit which forms a temporary bottom in such sack, and a motor-operated mechanism for moving the table in a descending and ascending manner;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view illustrating a portion of the hopper feed and table shown in FIG. 1 with an unfilled flexible sack affixed to the hopper and positioned within the slit of the table;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view like FIG. 2 except that the sack has been partially filled with cut filaments and the table has been lowered in allowing controlled filling of the sack;

FIG. 4 is an isometric view of the package of the invention; and

FIGS. 5a, 5b and 5c are isometric views diagrammatically illustrating the positioning of the package of the invention for insertion in a stock or feed box of a brushmaking machine (FIG. 5a), the positioned package in the stock box (FIG. 5b), and the removal of the flexible sack from the filaments in the stock box without disturbing the parallel relationship between filaments (FIG. 5c).

Referring to FIGS. 1--3, there is shown the hopper 10 of the novel apparatus of the invention formed of three welded plates 12, 14 and 16, and a shortened welded angled plate 18 shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. Cut filament normally enters the hopper 10 over the shortened angle plate 18 but the hopper 10 will function equally well if plate 18 is not angled and is the same length as plates 12, 14 and 16.

Affixed to plate 16 is a mechanical linkage for holding the tops of flexible sacks that are placed over the bottom of the hopper 10. This linkage consists of a lever 20 attached to a cam 22 which can be rotated 180° around a pivot point 24 in an opening 26 of plate 28. A double-nut arrangement 30 is used to hold the cam 22 in place with adequate sliding clearance. Counterclockwise movement of the lever 20 and the attached cam 22 causes plate 28 to descend while guided in slide bearings 32 and 34. In so descending, pins 36 and 38 are forced towards each other causing the levers 40 and 42 to pivot around pivot rods, such as rod 44, which connects pressure bar 46 to two shaped parts 50 and 52 on plate 14 as shown in FIG. 1, and pressure bar 48 to two similarly shaped parts 54 and 56 on plate 12 as shown in FIG. 2. Thus, pressure bars 46 and 48 are made to swing away from plates 14 and 12, respectively, permitting insertion of a sack edge under the pressure points and permitting removal of sacks when filled. Rubber tips 58, 60 and 62 force fitted in pressure bar 46 and rubber tips 64, 66 and 68 force fitted in pressure bar 48 hold the sack tops securely when lever 20 is swung to the position shown in FIG. 1. Plates 16 and 18 extend below plates 12 and 14 shown as extensions 70 and 72 to aid in holding positioned sacks held by pressure bars 46 and 48.

For controlled filament feeding, a microswitch 74 controls the movement of a drive mechanism 76 for the slit-containing sack support table 78 mounted on a polished circular shaft 80 by means of a bearing housing 82 having linear bearings on each internal end of such housing 82.

The microswitch 74 is mounted on plate 14 with an extended contact arm 84 protruding into the hopper 10 through an opening in plate 14. As illustrated in FIG. 1, the opening has been broken away to more fully show the microswitch arm 84.

The mechanism 76 includes a 10-r.p.m. geared motor 86 connected to a conventional electrical source and to the microswitch 74 which is in the open position when the arm 84 is extended as shown in FIG. 1. When the filament weight builds above arms 84 the switch 74 is closed and the motor 86 connected to the electrical source is started. In turn, the motor 86 drives a pinion 88 on a rack 90 in such manner that the sack support table 78 descends on shaft 80 until there is no longer a weight of filaments on the microswitch arm 76. At such time, the switch 74 opens breaking the electrical connection between the electrical source and motor 86, and motor 86 stops. A brake 91 fitted circumferentially on a disc at the undriven end of pinion 88 and attached to motor mount plate 92 by segment 94 is adjusted by bolt 96 extending through lip 98 into threaded fixed position in lip 100. Spring 102 on bolt 96 provides a force opposing the pinion pressure when pinion 88 is turning. The motor 86, pinion 88, interconnected linear bearing housing 82 and sack support table 78 are prevented from descending uncontrollably on the polished circular shaft 80 and the rack 90 as a result of their own substantial weight by means of the tare adjustment, spring-assisted brake 91 mounted on the pinion 88 at its furthest point from the pinion-driving motor 86 as shown in FIG. 1. With this arrangement moving and stopping the sack support table 78 on the polished vertical shaft 80 is accomplished smoothly.

In operation a sack 106 is threaded through the slit 108 in the sack support table 78 thereby forming a temporary sack bottom 110 at the top of the slit 108 for each position assumed by the table 78 as it is lowered on shaft 80 (See FIGS. 2 and 3).

Extending from sack table 78 are two extensions 112 and 114. Both extensions 112 and 114 are of suitable length so as to contact the projections of the switches 116 and 118 mounted on a support base 119. Switch 116 is electrically connected to the pinion motor 86 and the electrical source therefor. When the sack table 78 has been lowered to the desired point for filling the sack with cut filament contact between extension 112 and switch 116 turns off the pinion motor 86 to halt further lowering of the sack table 78. At the same time extension 114 contacts switch 118 to close the circuit to light 120 on extension 121 to visually indicate that the flexible sack has been filled with cut filaments.

To start a new sack-filling cycle disengagement of pinion 88 from rack 90 is necessary to return the sack support table 78 up to a position as shown in FIG. 2. This is accomplished by a lever-operated small pinion 122 working on rack 124 which has a circular bar 126 that passes through a hole in plate 128 and presses motor 86, motor-mounting plate 92, pinion 88, and brake 91 away from rack 90 upon counterclockwise rotation of lever 130. Reengagement of pinion 88 and rack 90 is accomplished by returning lever 130 to the position shown, its return being aided by spring 132 about the bar 126 and placed between rack 124 and plate 128. The return of the rack 124 is limited by contact of pin 134 against frame 136. The moving assembly rides on parts 138 and 140 which are connected with a circular rod extended through slot 142 and on parts 144 and 146 which are similarly connected with a circular rod extending through slot 142.

When a filled sack is being removed, a bayonet 148 is thrust by use of lever 150 through opposing slots 152 and 154 in plates 14 and 12 to support filament accumulation in the hopper 10. Housing 156 provides bearing surface for the bayonet 148 and extending bar 158 provides a stop when the bayonet 148 is withdrawn as shown in FIG. 1.

In FIG. 2, cut filament 160 is shown in the hopper 10 supported by bayonet 148 which extends through slot 154.

In FIG. 3, the bayonet 148 has been removed from the slots 154 and the cut filament has fallen by gravity to rest on the sack support table 78.

As shown in FIG. 1, both the shaft 80 and rack 90 are mounted between the plate 156 and the base 119, and are supported by such base 119.

In the practice of the method of the invention utilizing the illustrative embodiment of the apparatus, the flexible sack 106 is made from a transparent thermoplastic, rectangular in shape and of substantial length relative to the width thereof. In addition the sack 106 has gusseted sides 162 which move outwardly as the cut filament is added thereto. Furthermore, the upper end 164 of sack 106 is open and the bottom end 166 is closed by transverse heat seal 168.

To fill the sack 106, utilizing the illustrated apparatus, the lever 20 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction to move the pressure bars 46 and 48 away from plates 14 and 12. At the outset, moreover, the table 78 is positioned immediately under the hopper 10. With parts so positioned, the opened upper end 164 of sack 106 is placed about the bottom of the hopper 10 and the lever is rotated in a clockwise direction to cause the rubber tips of the pressure bars 46 and 48 to bear against the sack 106 thereby affixing it to the hopper 10. At the same time the sack 106 is threaded through the slit 108 in table 78 so that the sack 106 has a bottom 110 at the upper surface of the sack support table 78. The balance of the unfilled sack 106 dangles under the table 78 with the gusseted sides 162 collapsed as shown in FIG. 2.

During this phase of the operation the bayonet 148 extends through slots 152 and 154 to support the accumulation of filament 160 and prevent inadvertent discharge thereof from the hopper 10.

With everything in position as described, the motor 86 is turned on and cut filament is fed into the hopper 10 in parallel relationship. As previously set forth, such filament can be added manually, by rotary cutting as it emerges from a filament-producing unit or by guillotine cutting of it in bundles. In each instance the cut filament is added to the hopper 10 in general parallel relationship.

Concurrent with the adding of filament the bayonet 148 is withdrawn from the hopper 10.

When the filament weight builds above microswitch arm 84 the microswitch 74 is closed and the motor 86 begins to rotate pinion 88 so that the table 78 descends permitting filament to controllably fall by gravity from hopper 10 in general parallel relationship into the sack 106. Until the filling operation is completed the table 78 will descend as long as the cut filament maintains the microswitch 74 closed. Should there be insufficient filament weight on the microswitch arm 84 in the hopper 10, the motor 86 is stopped and the braking arrangement smoothly halts the movement of the table 78.

In FIG. 3 the sack 106 has been partially filled. The controlled and coordinated filling of the sack 106 and downward descent of the table 78 continues until the table 78 reaches the heat-sealed, bottom sack end 166. At such time the table extensions 112 and 114 contact switches 116 and 118 to halt motor 86 and to turn on light 120.

At this point the sack 106 is filled with cut filament 160 essentially parallel to each other and normal to the length of such sack 106. At this point also, the bayonet is inserted through the hopper 10.

Thereafter the filled sack 106 is removed and the cut filament level in the sack 106 is lowered by tapping to provide sufficient length of sack 106 above the filament level to permit folding at the upper end 164 and taping by tape 170 as shown in FIG. 4.

To start a fresh cycle the pinion 88 is disengaged from rack 90 by means of the lever-operated small pinion 122 and rack 124 arrangement previously described. The disengaged pinion 88, table 78 and associated parts are then raised until the table 78 is immediately below the hopper 10 at which point the pinion 88 is again moved into engagement with the rack 90.

The flexible sacks for the package of the invention can be fabricated using any flexible film or sheet. Such films or sheets may be made using polyethylene, polypropylene, vinyl chloride or other thermoplastics of a thickness in the order of 2 to 5 mils. The sacks can also be made from paper. Laminates of several materials can be used if desired. Preferably, however, the sacks are transparent to facilitate inspection and identification of contained cut filaments.

Uniformly, rectangularly shaped, flexible sacks of a gusset construction initially heat-sealed at one end have been found to be particularly useful. When filled such sacks can be closed at the other end by a number of means including heat-sealing, taping or stapling.

A typical package of the invention can contain 0.018-inch-diameter cut filaments 3.5 inches in length. The overall length of the filled sack is optional and can be 24 inches and the third dimension of the sack can be 4.25 inches. This latter dimension is also optional. Filaments having a maximum cross-sectional dimension of 0.002 to 0.300 inch can conveniently be contained in the package of the invention. The cut filament lengths can be from 1 to 14 inches.

With the package of the invention, moreover, it is remarkable that the filaments remain essentially parallel to each other during transit by truck or rail because of the constant jostling that they are exposed. Apparently the individual filaments in the loose sacks are constantly returned to parallel disposition by forces imparted by contact with adjacent fibers. This effect is apparent during filling of the sacks. Some filaments for one reason or other are not quite parallel to their companion fibers. These nonparallel fibers are easily brought to parallel disposition by lightly tapping the filled sack surface with the edge of one's hand such that the hand edge is parallel to the axes of the packaged filaments.

As previously discussed prior to the present invention the output of cut filaments per man-hour has been limited in the past by the number of long hanks having 3 inch diameter or less which an operator of an extrusion machine could paperwrap or place in shrunk film per hour. Further, cutting costs were dictated by the number of small bundle cuts a cutter could cut in 1 hour from the aforementioned long hanks. Still further, shipping department labor costs were dictated by the number of small cuts a shipper could stack in a carton per hour. The high labor costs incurred by brushmakers who use and open the small bundles has also already been cited.

By the practice of the present invention packaging, handling and shipping costs are materially reduced. For example, utilizing the package and method and apparatus of the invention it is just as easy to cut filaments and package cuts of such filaments having 16 square inch cross-sectional area as it is to cut 2.5-inch-diameter bundles having a 4.9 square inch cross-sectional area. Thus, less than one-third as many cuts have to be made by the practice of the present invention.

The relative weight of the hanks produced at the machine would also be in the same ratio so that the output of an extrusion unit is increased considerably without the need for handling a greater number of long hanks by the practice of the present invention.

Further, each package of the invention may contain cut filament having weight equivalent to that contained in 20 cuts of paper wrapping or shrunk film packaged bundles. Thus each shipping carton of 60 pounds contains six of the new packages versus 120 of the old cut bundles. The labor saved in filling shipping cartons with the packages of the invention is obvious.

In addition the cost of material used in paper-wrapping or shrunk film enclosure of cut filament is in the order of 2 cents per pound. This amount may represent 6 percent of the selling price of certain cut filaments. In the instance of the package of the invention the packaging cost is 0.3 cents per pound.

The weight of shrunken film on bundles of filament 3 inch diameter or less represents a shipping tare weight of 1.33 percent in terms of the cut filament weight. In the instance of paper-wrapped bundles the wrapping represents a tare weight of 2.25 percent. The package of the invention represents a tare weight in the order of 0.64 percent. Thus, the savings in shipping costs is appreciable using the new package.

Bundles packaged using shrunken film or paper-wrapping may split or spill their contents during transit to end users. The novel package of the invention contains the filament on all sides so that spillage is not a problem. Further, the looseness of the sacks used in the package of the invention prevents stress concentrations and greatly minimizes package splitting.

The package of the invention also substantially increases the ease with which packaged cut filament can be sued for many specifications.

Prior to the present invention, for example, a brushmaker had to slit open a number of filament bundles having a diameter of 3 inches or less to fill the stock boxes of brush machines. This was a time-consuming chore and spillage of filaments was often substantial.

With the package of the present invention, the filling of the stock box is accomplished in one operation. This is illustrated in FIGS. 5a, 5b, and 5c hereof.

In FIG. 5a the package 172 of the invention is positioned over a stock box 174 having vertical guides 176 and a base 178. The package 172 is in reverse disposition from that shown in the filling operation to facilitate removal of the sack 106 as in FIG. 5c.

In FIG. 5b the inverted package 172 has been positioned in the stock box 174 with sack taped end 164 resting upon base 178. By simply removing tape 170 the sack 106 is readied for removal from filaments 160.

As shown in FIG. 5c the flexible sack 106 has been removed from the filaments without disturbing the parallel relationship by upwardly sliding the sack 105 away from the filaments 160. The unwrapped and undisturbed parallel filaments are then ready to be formed into tufts for brushes by known picking methods in which size-controlled bundles are removed from the bottom of the stock or feed box.