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Title:
BALE STACKER
United States Patent 3565272
Abstract:
A trailer stacker for a tractor-drawn baler wherein a platform is mounted on wheels to receive bales from the baler for manual stack building on the platform; a ram operated by the hydraulic system of the tractor for elevating the platform and depositing the built stack on the ground; feet carried by the rear part of the platform for contact with the ground in the stack-depositing operation to take the weight of the stack and platform, and prevent stack tipping or ground movement; said stack adapted to be deposited on runners carried by the platform for withdrawal from under the deposited stack, when the stacker is drawn ahead in the stack depositing position; a pivoted hitch between the baler and the stacker for accommodating the movements of the two machines over uneven ground; and means for locking the hitch against said accommodating movements and locking the steering of the stacker, for elevation of the front wheels thereof clear of the ground when the baler is removed and said hitch is directly connected to the drawbar of the tractor, for relift of deposited stacks and their removal to another location.


Inventors:
Gerhard, Schettler Mclean E. (Saskatchewan, CA)
Emery Schettler, Mclean (Saskatchewan, CA)
Peter, Anderson Southey B. (Saskatchewan, CA)
Application Number:
04/801580
Publication Date:
02/23/1971
Filing Date:
02/24/1969
Assignee:
GERHARD E. SCHETTLER
EMERY SCHETTLER
PETER B. ANDERSON
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
280/445
International Classes:
A01D85/00; A01D87/12; A01D90/08; (IPC1-7): B60P1/16
Field of Search:
214/501,505,6B,147 280
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3450281METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR STACKING HAY AND THE LIKE1969-06-17Groberg
3412882Tiltable loading and unloading truck bed construction1968-11-26Stockwell
3357580Bale stack loaders and unloaders1967-12-12Schettler et al.
3180510Trailer-garage for golf buggies1965-04-27Moller
2726115Unloading apparatus1955-12-06Babcock et al.
2676814Tobacco leaf transorting vehicle1954-04-27Cox
1512521Trailer truck1924-10-21Cadman
Foreign References:
SU138109A11960-11-30
Primary Examiner:
Albert, Makay J.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Walter, Boggiss C.
Claims:
1. A bale stacker, comprising: a wheel-supported platform having a series of spaced vertical runners across the rear end thereof for reception of a stack of the bales thereon and against said runners; the rear end of said platform pivotally mounted; an hydraulic ram carried by the stacker for power upending the platform on its pivotal mount and lowering said runners for ground deposit of the stack of bales on the runners; a pair of end-curved feet mounted on the platform, one on each side thereof, with each foot pivotally connected to the rear end of the stacker, for rolling contact of said feet and platform on the ground to a braked flat position therewith, including lift of the stacker during said platform upending, for support of the deposited stack without upset; and said runners slidable from under said ground-deposited stack in withdrawal of the stacker therefrom.

2. A bale stacker, comprising: a wheel-supported platform for stack reception thereon; said platform having the rear end thereof pivotally mounted and supporting a series of spaced vertical runners thereacross for stack reception against said runners; an hydraulic ram carried by the stacker for power upending the platform on its pivotal mount and for ground deposit of a received stack on said runners; a hitch linkage pivotally connecting said stacker with a draft machine to accommodate movements of the two machines over uneven ground; and means for locking said linkage against said movements so the stacker can be lifted on its back wheels by said linkage, with the front wheels thereof clear of the ground.

3. A bale stacker, comprising: a front and rear wheeled frame having a platform supported and rear pivoted thereon; the rear end of said platform having a spaced series of vertical runners thereacross for the building of a stack of bales on the framework against said runners; an hydraulic ram carried by said frame for power upending the platform on its pivotal mount and ground deposit of the built-up stack of bales on said runners; a tongue for steering the front support wheels of said frame around a kingpin; and link means for releasably connecting said tongue with the frame, to lock the front wheels against said steering and permit lift of the front end of the stacker on the back support wheels thereof by said tongue.

4. A four-wheel supported bale stacker, comprising: a pair of front-converging frame members rear carried by a cross axle and the front end thereof terminating in a boxing which receives a kingpin carried by a tongue, said tongue adapted for turning the front support wheels around said kingpin; a platform supported by and rear pivoted on said frame members, and carrying a rear series of spaced vertical runners thereacross; said platform adapted for the building of a stack of bales thereon against said runners; a crossbar carried by the frame members, and a saddle member supported between the cross bar and the rear axle; an hydraulic ram pivotally connecting the saddle member with, and for power upending of, the platform, to ground deposit a built stack on said runners; and link means for releasably connecting said tongue with said saddle member to lock the front support wheels against said turning.

Description:
The present invention is an improvement over former U.S. Pat. No. 3,357,580, dated Dec. 12, 1967, for Bale Stack Loaders and Unloaders, in the names of Gerhard E. Schettler and Emery Schettler, and the principal general objects thereof, like the above former patent, are: to provide a trailer stacker for drawing behind a tractor-pulled baling machine for bale delivery thereto from said baler, such that the bales can be hand arranged and interlocked in a stack on said stacker by an operator; the dump mechanism of the stacker connected to the hydraulic system of the tractor for operation thereby for power dump of said built stack on the ground without spilling, including relifting of the dumped stacks for transport and deposit to another location, when required. A further object of the invention is: to design and construct an improved frame for support and upending of the stack-supporting platform.

A further object of the invention is: to design and provide dump shoes on the rear of the stacker platform to support the stack being up-ended and prevent stacker movement, including tipping of the stack in the final movement.

A further object of the invention is: to provide an improved reinforcement on the platform for the rear stake runners.

A further object of the invention is: to provide a traction hitch linkage between the stacker and the draft machine for accommodating movements of the two machines over undulating ground.

A further object of the invention is: to provide means on the traction hitch linkage and on the stacker frame for clear elevation of the front wheels of the stacker above the ground, when draft connected to the tractor for relocation of stacks.

With the above important and other minor objects in view, which will become more apparent as the description proceeds, the invention consists essentially in the design, construction and arrangement of the various parts hereinafter more particularly described, reference being had to the accompanying drawings wherein like characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in the several FIGS. and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side view of the stacker loaded with bales;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the same stacker in the dumped position;

FIG. 3 is a partial view of the underside of the stacker platform in the dumped position;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged perspective view of the front portion of the stacker frame and the rear part of the traction hitch;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the forward part of the traction hitch;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged perspective view of the rear part of the stacker frame;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged perspective view of the reinforced end of a runner on the stacker platform;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged partial perspective of the rear part of the stacker platform and showing the runners;

FIG. 9 is a reduced side view of the stacker and connected to a tractor for stack moving.

The stacker shown in FIG. 1 is carried by front and rear wheels 10 and 11 respectively. These wheels support a frame which is best shown in FIG. 4 and 6 and will now be described.

Referring to FIG. 6, the wheels 11 are mounted on stub axles 12 and 13 which support a built-up axle 14 which comprises an upper square tubing 15 welded to lower inverted end channels 16 and 17 which in turn are welded to and support a lower crossbar 18, spaced from the tubing 15. Each end of the axle 14 carries the rear ends of a pair of frame channel irons 19 and 20 through vertical plates 14', and the channel irons converge as they pass ahead. A crossbar 21 connects the frame channels, and three spaced saddle bars 22, 23 and 24 extend centrally back from this crossbar with their rear ends supported in the spacing between the tubing 15 and the crossbar 18. Just in front of the rear axle 14, the saddle bars are each provided with a bearing 25 for a purpose later explained. The central part of the crossbar 21 also supports a lower triangular-shaped plate 26, the rear end of which is welded to the saddle bar 23 while the front end projects in a bracket 27.

Referring to FIG. 4, the front ends of the frame channels 19 and 20 terminate in a large boxing 28 which forms a vertical bearing for a kingpin 29, the upper end of which is secured to a rectangular-shaped horizontal plate 30. The lower end of the kingpin is supported from a built-up tongue 31 carried by side axles 32 and 33 which rotatably receive the front wheels 10. The kingpin is also reinforced by angular bars 34 from both the tongue and the side axles. A downwardly sloping bar 35 connects the front of the plate 30 with the tongue 31, so that when the tongue and kingpin turn to steer the wheels 10, the sloping bar 35 and the plate 30 will turn therewith.

The rear part of the tongue 31 carries a pair of lugs 36, one on each side, and each lug pivotally carries a link 37. An upper lug 38 on the rear end of the tongue is pivotally connected to a further pair of links 39. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, the above links are unattached and the tongue 31 is free to turn the wheels 10 in a wide sweep. However, when required, the free ends of the above links can be lifted and bolted, as at 40, (FIGS. 2 and 9) to the bracket 27 to hold the tongue straight lengthwise and against turning. It will also be noted in FIG. 4 that a front crossbar 41 connects the frame channels 19 and 20 and in turn supports buffer blocks 42, one on each channel.

By again referring to FIG. 6 it will be seen that a pair of lugs 43 are welded to the rear ends of the frame channels 19 and 20 and pivotally carry arms 44, one on each lug, which are welded to and each support one of the rear corners of a platform 45 (see FIGS. 1 and 2). This platform comprises a double framework 46 and 47, bolted together in flush relation as indicated at 48 (FIG. 3) and then covered with a wire mesh surface 49 for the support of bales 50 thereon (FIGS. 1 and 2). This platform is reinforced by spaced under trusses 51, one on each side. Three spaced pivot points 52 are centrally provided at the joint of the double frameworks. In the present instance, the central one of these pivot points only is connected, through a ram 53, with the central bearing 25 of the saddle member 23, so the platform can be hydraulically lifted on the bosses 43 for the stack-dumping operation, as shown in FIG. 2, or returned onto the buffer blocks 42, as shown in FIG. 1.

If desired, two rams could be connected (not shown) between the outer pivot points 52 and the bearings 25 of the outer saddle members 22 and 24, or three rams could be used if the central one 53 were retained in combination with the outer two. The front of the platform carries a forward sloping rail 54, (FIG. 1).

It will be noted in FIG. 8 that a series of vertical runners 55 are carried by the rear end of the platform 45, and against which the bales 50 may be stacked (see FIG. 1). The upper ends of the runners are pointed while their lower ends pass through straps 56, bolted to the rear edge of the platform. The runners then continue down to a position therebelow and between a pair of guide angles 57 (FIG. 7) carried by short angles 58 on the bottom of the platform. The extreme ends of the runners are then bolted at 59 (FIG. 3) to the angles 58. Accordingly, the runners swing with the platform.

It will be particularly noted in FIG. 3, and also in FIG. 6, that the rear end of the platform and the frame channels 19 and 20 carry a pair of ski-shaped feet members 60, each through a double-forked linkage 61. The narrow forks of these linkages span the reinforcing plates 62 of the feet members. The wider forks of the linkages span and are pivot connected to the arms 44, the lugs 43, and a pair of further arms 63 which are positioned in space-parallel relation with those 44, and are similarly secured to the platform. Further rear pairs of spaced arms 64 pivotally connect the feet parts 62 with each side of the platform 45 through the linkages 61.

The forward end of the tongue 31 is provided with a pair of projecting lugs 65 which pivotally support the rear end of a traction hitch 66 (see FIG. 4), the hitch having a front clevis 7 (FIG. 5) for attachment to a draft machine, such as a baler or a tractor.

A vertical angle 68 extends upwardly from the rear of the hitch 66 and supports an angularly positioned square tubing 69 which extends from the hitch and projects slightly over the angle 68 to be secured to a U-shaped plate 70. The tubing 69 also carries a short piece of tubing 71. The front portion of the hitch (see FIG. 5) supports a short vertical standard 72 which terminates in an upper broken ring 73. This ring receives the hosings (not shown) from the hydraulic system of the tractor 79, which then pass through the tubing 71 (FIG. 4) and into the boxing 28 at 73' where they pass back through the frame for connection to the ram 53. A Y-shaped clevis 74 is pivotally straddled over the sloping bar 35 and can be adjusted thereon by changing the pivot to the various holes shown at 75. The leg of this Y is received in the central slot of the U-shaped plate 70 and a cross pin 76 prevents its withdrawal and normally holds the hitch 66 elevated on the tongue 31. When this hitch is connected to the baler drawbar (not shown) for delivery of bales to the stacker, the U-shaped plate 70 slides back and forth on the leg of the Y-shaped clevis 74 as the hitch pivots to accommodate variations in the land between the two machines. A cross pin (not shown) can be passed through a hole 77 (FIG. 1) in the leg of the clevis 74 to prevent this movement, and a pair of square bars 78 are welded to the top rear portion of the plate 70 for contact with this pin to prevent the clevis from rising. Accordingly, when this pin is in place and the links 37 and 39 are bolted to the bracket 27 and the hitch connection 67 is secured direct to the drawbar of the tractor 79, as shown in FIG. 9, the higher position of this latter drawbar will cause the front wheels 10 to be elevated above the ground and the stacker will be carried on the two rear wheels 11.

When operating in the field, the tractor 79 is first connected to the baler (not shown) which in turn is connected to the hitch of the stacker. Accordingly, as the baler is drawn over the ground and the bales are formed, they are delivered onto the platform 45 of the stacker where an operator builds them into a horizontal stack, against the runners 55. When the peak of the stack is being formed at the front of the platform the operator is protected from falling off by the forward sloping rail 54. In this building operation it will be seen that the platform 45 is tipped slightly rearward to place some of the bale weight against the runners 55, while the links 37 and 39 are disconnected from the bracket 27 and the pin is removed from the hole 77, so the front wheels 10 are free to steer and the traction hitch 66 is free to pivot up and down. When the stack is built the machines are stopped, and the operator on the tractor 79 moves the hydraulic control to dump the stack by the ram 53, as shown in FIG. 2. As the platform rises to the vertical position, the rear feet 60 come into contact with the ground to take the weight of the stack being dumped, and the rear wheels 11 are slightly lifted to prevent stacker or stack side movement while the runners come down onto the ground. When the stack is firmly deposited, the tractor, with baler, is driven ahead, thus drawing the stacker therebehind on the front wheels 10 and the rear feet 60, and as the vertical platform 45 leaves this deposited stack the runners 55 are drawn from thereunder. The operator then reverses the hydraulic controls to lower the platform back onto the buffer blocks 42 and the feet 60 come back up into place clear of the ground, as shown in FIG. 1. The baling operation is then continued until the next stack is built on the platform ready for deposit.

When the baling is completed and all the stacks have been set up in place, the baler is disconnected from between the tractor and the stacker. The links 37 and 39 of the stacker frame are lifted and bolted to the bracket 27, a pin is placed in the hole 77 of the clevis 74, and the clevis 67 of the traction hitch is directly connected to the drawbar (not shown) of the tractor 79, and as this drawbar is much higher than the one on the baler, the front wheels of the stacker are lifted well off the ground, as shown in FIG. 9. By this arrangement, the stacker acts in the manner of a two-wheeled trailer and the operator on the tractor can quickly maneuver the stacker into the various positions required when stacks are to be relifted, transported and redeposited.

In the relifting operation, the stacker is backed up into alignment with the stack to be relifted, the hydraulic system of the tractor is operated to upend the platform 45 to the dump position, with the runners 55 on the ground. The tractor then backs the stacker against the stack, the runners 55 sliding thereunder until the platform 45 comes into contact. The ram 53 is then operated to return the platform onto the buffer blocks 42 and the stack is lifted back onto the stacker to the position shown in FIG. 1. The operator then drives the tractor, with the loaded stacker, to a suitable spot selected which is off the field, and the stack is redumped, as previously explained. The stacker is then returned to the field and the other stacks are orderly lifted, taken to the same selected spot, dumped, and pressed into contact with the original dumped stacks by backing the stacker thereagainst with the tractor. When all the stacks have been so removed and compactly stacked together, the field will be cleared entirely for plowing, or other use.