Title:
COIN REJECTOR MECHANISMS
United States Patent 3559790


Abstract:
The disclosure is directed to improvements in a coin rejector of the type disclosed in U.S. Letters Pat. No. 3,289,802 and more specifically to a coin rejector mechanism which can be accurately and quickly set or adjusted to operate in a positive manner with respect to any size coin and/or coin denomination so that only coins of predetermined materials, thickness and diameter will be accepted thereby, and all other coins rejected; and which rejector is also provided with means for prohibiting an unscrupulous individual from retrieving a coin which has been accepted by the rejector mechanism.



Inventors:
Greenwald, Harry (Whitestone, NY)
Frankenberg, Paul (Brooklyn, NY)
Application Number:
04/722301
Publication Date:
02/02/1971
Filing Date:
04/18/1968
Assignee:
GREENWALD INDUSTRIES INC.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
194/334, 194/335, 194/345
International Classes:
G07F1/04; (IPC1-7): G07F3/02
Field of Search:
194/99,102
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3126081N/AMarch 1964Dolman
2823783Coin testing deviceFebruary 1958Patzer et al.
2770343Coin testerNovember 1956Andrews et al.
1701875Coin-controlled mechanismFebruary 1929DuGrenier



Primary Examiner:
Coleman, Samuel F.
Claims:
We claim

1. In combination with a coin rejector mechanism having means defining a coin chute with a fixed wall portion and an inclined movable wall portion pivotally connected to said fixed wall portion, said movable wall portion having its free end biased toward said fixed wall portion; said movable wall having an edge portion to define with said fixed wall a discharge opening for receiving acceptable coins, a bottom ledge carried in said movable wall portion, said ledge being formed so that coins rolling on said ledge tend to normally lean toward said inclined movable wall portion, and guide means cooperatively associated with said ledge for guiding a coin so that a properly sized coin is uprighted as said coin rolls along said bottom ledge to line up with said discharge opening the improvement of:

2. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein said adjustable diameter gauging means includes:

3. The invention as defined in claim 2 and including a vernier diameter adjustment means mounted on said plate for making very fine diameter sizing adjustments.

4. The invention as defined in claim 3 wherein said plate member is provided with an elongated vertically disposed slotted opening:

5. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein said adjustable thickness gauging means comprise a pair of dial members, each having a threaded stem extending through said fixed wall toward said inclined movable wall portion.

6. The invention as defined in claim 5 wherein each of said dial means is provided with prescribed marking thereon which relate to the fixed thickness gauge reading.

7. The invention as defined in claim 6 wherein one of said pair of dial members includes a first dial member being cooperatively associated with said movable wall portion to vary the spacing thereof relative to said fixed wall whereby a coin having a thickness less than that of an acceptable coin is wedged in said spacing.

8. The invention ad defined in claim 6 wherein the other of said pair of dial members is adjusted to prohibit a coin having a greater thickness than that of an acceptable coin from passing through said coin chute.

9. The invention as defined in claim 1 and including a deflector screw threaded through the fixed plate of the rejector.

10. The invention as defined in claim 1 and including a cutter means for prohibiting the retrieving of any coins passing through said rejector.

11. The invention as defined in claim 10 wherein said cutter comprises a notched blade connected to the end of said bottom ledge carried on said movable wall.

12. A coin rejector adapted for use with a coin meter of a vending machine or the like for accepting only properly sized coins comprising:

Description:
PROBLEM

Coin rejector mechanisms of the type disclosed by U.S. Pat. No. 3,289,802 are provided with various adjusting devices to effect the setting thereof for receiving only a receiving only a prescribed coin of a given thickness and given diameter. However such adjustments were only possible by an extensive trial and error method which was tedious and time consuming to make, and at best one was never certain that the adjustments were properly performed.

In many instances experience has also indicated that many unscrupulous individuals constantly seek ways of defrauding the coin meter and the rejector mechanism was developed to prohibit and/or discourage such efforts. Coin rejector mechanisms of the type to which this invention relates have been provided with various means for detecting undersized coins, oversized coins, slugs made of magnetically attracted materials, washers and the like. Because unscrupulous individuals have come to learn of these built-in devices to discourage the use of other than properly sized coins, means have been devised to retrieve otherwise acceptable coins after the deposit thereof. Generally this has been achieved by securing a string or other thin filament to a properly sized coin so that upon depositing the coin in the coin meter, it would satisfactorily pass through the coin rejector position to trip the appropriate switches to energize a particular machine cycle, and at which time the unscrupulous person would then retrieve the coin by pulling it out of the meter by the string or filament attached thereto.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide an improved coin rejector mechanism with means whereby the setting thereof may be instantly made and thereby eliminate the heretofore tedious and time consuming trial and error method heretofore required.

Another object is to provide a coin rejector mechanism with means for prohibiting the retrieving of an otherwise acceptable coin by an unscrupulous individual.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The foregoing objects and other features and advantages are attained by a coin rejector mechanism adapted for use with a coin meter of a vending machine or the like that is constructed and arranged so as to be readily adjusted to receive only proper, predeterminately sized, coins which are capable of being passed therethrough, and to reject all other sized coins so that the cycle of the associated vending machine is initiated only upon the passage of an acceptable coin through the coin rejector. The coin rejector mechanism comprises essentially a fixed mounting plate having a hinged plate pivotally connected thereto. The hinged plate is pivoted so that its free end inclines downwardly and inwardly toward the fixed plate to define therewith a coin chute having an inclined relatively movable side wall portion. A spring means is provided for normally biasing the hinge plate toward the fixed mounting plate so as to be normally inclined toward the fixed plate. Beneath the converging coin chute thus defined there is provided a means for defining an acceptable coin passageway and a juxtapositioned unacceptable coin passageway. The coin chute is provided with means for defining a coin discharge opening through which only the acceptable coins are permitted to pass therethrough for deposit in the acceptable coin passageway which is disposed in alignment therewith, and which leads to the coin receptible for receiving the acceptable coins. The hinge plate is also provided with a cutout portion formed in the inclined plane thereof to define an opening through which coins having a diameter less than that of an acceptable coin are rejected.

Cooperatively associated with the hinged plate and the cutout portion therein is a thickness sizing means formed with an inturned flange, which defines a ledge disposed between the hinged plate and the fixed mounting plate to form the bottom of the coin chute. The ledge is preferably slanted downwardly toward the acceptable coin passageway with the edge thereof beveled toward the fixed plate. The beveled edge defining the bottom of the coin chute forms the surface on which the acceptable coins deposited in the coin chute will roll to the coin passageway.

An adjustable dial means having marked indicia thereon is provided for varying the spacing of the beveled edge of the sizing means from the fixed wall of the coin chute to define a space for hanging up those coins having an unacceptable thickness, that is, a thickness which is less than the width of the space defined between the fixed wall and the ledge of the sizing means. In this manner coins having a thickness less than that of an acceptable coin become wedged between the hinged plate and the fixed plate.

A second adjustable dial gauged means having marked indicia thereon is also provided to prohibit the passage of coins having a thickness greater than that of an acceptable coin through the coin chute.

Cooperatively associated with the sizing plate and connected to the hinged plate adjacent to the opening formed in the plane thereof is an adjacent to the opening formed in the plane thereof is an adjustable diameter sizing means. The arrangement is such that the adjustable diameter sizing means and thickness sizing means cooperate to gauge therebetween the diameter of an acceptable or prescribed coin. The diameter sizing means is further provided with means of hanging up those coins having a diameter greater than that for which the coin rejector mechanism has been adjusted to receive. The diameter sizing means is further provided with a vernier adjustment for accommodating for any slight variations in the diameters of acceptable coins. The arrangement is such that coins having diameter less than that of an acceptable coin will, when rolling down the beveled ledge due to the inclination of the hinged plate, be rejected through the cutout formed in the plane of the hinged plate, and thereafter be directed to the passageway for receiving unacceptable coins which connects with the coin return chute of an associated vending machine. If desired, a magnetic means may be disposed adjacent a wall portion of the coin chute for attracting thereto slugs formed of a ferrous material. Also, if desired a washer detecting dog may be cooperatively associated with the coin chute for hanging up thereon washer type slugs which are frequently inserted in coin vending machines.

To retrieve otherwise acceptable coins after they have actuated the appropriate switch means for energizing the machine cycle controlled by the coin meter, certain unscrupulous individuals attach a string or filament to the deposited coin. Therefore, a means is provided for severing or cutting any string or filament which certain individuals may secure to an acceptable coin.

Gauge means are further built-in and formed as an integral part of the coin rejector mechanism for determining both the diameter and thickness of a prescribed coin. These fixed gauge means are keyed to the indicia marked on the adjustable dial means for controlling the spacing between the wall and the bottom ledge of the coin chute, the indicia and dial means for controlling or measuring the thickness of a prescribed coin passing through the coin chute and diameter sizing means whereby the respective adjusting means can be readily set to accommodate a prescribed coin with a maximum of ease and a minimum of effort.

Cooperatively associated with a movable or hinged plate is a rejector lever which when actuated causes the hinged plate to be moved away from the fixed plate to release any hung up coin. A wiper lever is operatively associated with the rejector lever so as to swing past a magnetic means to dislodge any slug attracted thereto upon the actuation of the rejector lever. In doing so any slug or coin so dislodged are automatically directed to the unacceptable coin passageway which connects with the coin return chutes of an associated vending machine.

A feature of this invention resides in the provision of adjustable dial means for predetermining the setting or spacing between the inclined hinged plate and the fixed mounting plate of the coin meter and for determining the coin thickness of a prescribed coin adapted to be acceptable by the rejector mechanism.

Another feature of this invention resides in the provision of integrally forming as a part of the coin meter a gauge means for determining the diameter and thickness of a particular coin and which fixed gauge readings are utilized to properly effect the desired setting of the respective adjustable dial means to predetermine the settings of the coin rejector.

Another feature of the invention resides in the provision of a string cutting means disposed in the path of an otherwise acceptable coin deposited within the coin meter so as to sever the string in the event an individual attempts to retrieve such coin

Other features and advantages will become more readily apparent when considered in view of the drawings and description in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates the front elevation view of a coin rejector mechanism embodying the present invention.

FIG 2 is a left end view of FIG. 1. FIG. 3 is a right end view of FIG. 1. FIG. 4 is a rear elevation view of FIG. 1. FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 on FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating the position of a coin passing through the coin rejecting mechanism.

FIG. 7 is a view similar to that of FIG. 6 showing the stoppage of a coin with too great of a thickness.

FIG. 8 is a view like FIG. 7 showing the stoppage of a coin having a thickness less than that of an acceptable coin.

FIG. 9 is a detail view of the diameter sizing means.

FIG. 10 is a detail prospective view of the vernier adjustment means for use on the diameter sizing means.

FIG. 11 is a plan view of the diameter sizing means of FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 is a detailed showing of the string cutting means.

In the drawings there is shown the coin rejecting mechanism 20 of the present invention. The coin rejecting mechanism comprises a fixed or mounting plate 21 having laterally bent flange portions 21A extending along the opposed side edges thereof. Connected between the opposed flanges 21A is a hinged plate 22. The hinged plate 22 is pivotally connected between the opposed flange portions 21A by means of hinge pins 23,24. As shown, the hinged plate 22 is connected adjacent the upper end of the fixed plate 21 so that in its normal position, the hinged plate 22 is inclined or angled downwardly and toward the fixed plate 21 to define therebetween a coin chute 25 which is substantially V shaped in cross section, as best seen in FIG. 5. The coin chute 25 is open at the upper end 25A, the open end thereof being disposed in alignment with the coin insert passageway of a coin meter (not shown). A spring means 26 coiled about hinge pin 24 is utilized to exert a bias or force on the hinged plate 22 to normally maintain the free lower end thereof biased in the direction of the fixed plate 21.

Between the opposed flanges 21A of the fixed plate 21 and located immediately below the lower edge of the hinged plate 22, there is provided a coin guide plate 27 to define a pair of juxtaposed side-by-side coin passageways 28,29 as best shown in FIG. 5. The coin guide plate 27 is provided with a V-shaped bottom edge portion in which the opposed edges thereof are provided with oppositely bent flanges 27A, 27B which define an inclined bottom wall for the respective coin passageways 28,29. Thus the passageway 28 defined between the coin guide plate 27 and fixed plate 21 defines a passageway or chute for receiving the acceptable or properly sized coins which are permitted to pass through the coin rejector. The passageway 29 defined by the coin guide plate 27 and a guide cover 30 secured between the flanges 21A of the fixed plate 21 define the coin passageway or chute in which the unacceptable or improperly sized coins are directed. Passageway 29 for receiving the unacceptable coins is adapted to connect with the coin return chute (not shown) utilized in conjunction with the coin rejecting mechanism herein described.

The plane of the hinged plate 22 is provided with a cutout portion 31 as shown in FIG. 1. Also, the lower portion of the hinged plate 22 is provided with the laterally bent flange 32 which is inclined in the direction of the coin passageways 28, 29 as shown in FIG. 1. A thickness sizing means 33 is connected to the inclined flange 32 of the hinge plate 22 as best seen in FIGS. 5 and 6. The sizing means 33 comprises a plate which is secured to the inclined flange 32 of the hinged plate 22 and which is provided with laterally bent portion 33A to define a ledge 34 interposed between the hinged plate 22 and the fixed plate 21 of the coin rejector mechanism. The arrangement is such that the ledge 34 defined by the bent portion 33A of the sizing means 33 forms an inclined bottom wall for the coin chute 25. Preferably the upper edge of the ledge 34 is angled or inclined toward the fixed plate (see FIG. 5). Because of the normal inclination of the hinged plate 22 and the angle of the ledge 34, a coin received in the coin chute 25 will tend to assume an inclined or leaning position toward the plane of the hinged plate 22 as it rolls down the ledge 34 defining the bottom of the coin chute 25. As will be hereinafter described this inclination of the coin is utilized to cause the rejection of coins having undersized diameters.

As noted in FIGS. 1 and 5 the hinged plate 22 is provided with a beveled edge 35 portion inclined toward the fixed plate 21 to define with the inner surface of the fixed plate 21 a coin discharge opening 36 arranged to communicate with the coin passageway 28 for receiving the acceptable coins as they successfully pass through the coin rejecting mechanism 20 as will be hereinafter described. The coin discharge channel 36 for acceptable coins is disposed immediately above the top opening of the acceptable coin passageway 28 and the inlet opening thereto is defined by beveled edge 35 and the fixed wall 21.

Cooperatively associated with the thickness sizing means 33 is a diameter sizing means 37. The function of the diameter sizing means 37 is to permit only coins of proper diameter to pass through the coin rejecting mechanism 20. As best seen in FIGS. 1, 5 and 6 the diameter sizing means 37 comprises an angled member which has one leg portion 37A thereof adjustably connected to the hinged plate with the other leg portion 37B thereof extending through the cutout of the hinged plate 22. The arrangement is such that the bent leg portion 37B of the diameter sizer means and the ledge of thickness sizer are disposed in parallel, and each define the upper and lower marginal portions of the cutout portion 31 in the hinged plate 22. As best seen in FIG. 1 the leg portion 37A of the diameter sizing means 37 is adjustably secured to the hinged plate 22 by means of suitable screws 38 or the like, while its other leg portion 37B is angularly bent toward the fixed plate 21. The arrangement is such that coins of proper diameter rolling down the inclined ledge 34, which defines the bottom of the coin chute 25, will have the upper tangent point thereof rolling along the edge 39 of inturned leg portion 37B of the diameter sizer, as seen in FIG. 6.

Referring to FIG. 1 a fixed diameter gauge means is provided for determining the diameter of a particular coin. As shown a ledge 30A is defined by a laterally bent portion of the guide cover plate 30. Spaced above the ledge 30A are a plurality of spaced markings 30B which are suitably identified by numbers or the like to provide a reference to each size coin adapted to be received by the rejector. As indicated an acceptable or proper sized coin C1, may be gauged for its diameter by placing the edge of the coin on the ledge 30A and noting the marking 30B which is disposed tangent to the opposed edge portion of the coin C1. For example, a 25 cent piece when placed on the ledge 30A will coincide with marking number 5 of the series of markings 30B.

A corresponding series of markings 31A, 31B are disposed on either side of the cutout 31 formed in the hinge plate. Referring to FIG. 1 it will be noted that the diameter sizing means comprises a plate member 37 having elongated end portions 137, 137 each provided with elongated slots 137A by which plate 37 is adjustably fixed to the hinge plate 22 by fasteners 38 adapted to be received in slots 137A. The arrangement is such that the lower edge portions 137B of the plate 37 are adapted to be set to the appropriate marking 31A in a manner to be hereinafter described so that only coins of prescribed diameter will be accepted by the rejector mechanism 20.

In the illustrated form of the invention a vernier diameter adjustment means 138 is provided. Referring to FIGS. 1, 9 and 10 it will be noted that member 37 is provided with an elongated slot 137C which is adapted to receive a bent leg portion 138A of the vernier means 138. The vernier has its other leg portion 138B pivotally mounted to plate 37 by a pivot pin 139. A means for locking the vernier 138 in adjusted position comprises a lock fastener 140. To provide for limited adjustment of the vernier relative to the diameter sizer 37, leg portion 138B of member 138 is provided with a slotted hole 138C for receiving the lock screw 140. When the lock screw 140 is loosened, the vernier 138 can be pivoted a limited amount relative to the sizer plate 37 to raise or lower the bent portion 138A within its slotted opening 137C. If desired a neutral reference 141 may be provided to effect very fine adjustments for gauging the diameter of an acceptable coin.

A fixed thickness gauge means is also provided. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 a portion 30C of the guide plate 30 is angularly bent relative to the plane of plate 30 about foldline F1. Referring to FIG. 1 the bent portion 30C is provided with a notch 30D having a width which is sized to the thickness of a prescribed coin. Accordingly the width of a prescribed coin can be determined by placing it relative to the notch 30D. The arrangement is such that the proper sized coin diameter will be gauged by the edge 34 of the ledge of the diameter sizer means and by the vernier 138. Accordingly, all coins with proper sized diameters will roll between the vernier 138 and the edge 34 of the thickness sizer plate 33. In the event that a coin C2 with too large a diameter is inserted to the coin chute 25, the oversized coin will be prohibited from rolling down the inclined bottom wall 34 of the coin chute by the projecting leg 138A of the diameter vernier sizer means as shown in FIG. 8. When this occurs oversized coin C2 will become hung up in the coin chute between the ledge 34 defining the bottom wall of the chute and the projecting leg 138A.

To render the coin rejecting mechanism 20 adjustable for operation with differently sized coins, the diameter sizing means 37 is provided with elongated slots 137A to permit for limited adjustment of the sizer 37 with respect to the hinged plate and the bottom wall of the coin chute. In this manner, the diameter sizing means 37 may be adjusted to accommodate any predetermined coin diameter falling within the adjusting range of the diameter sizer plate and as determined by the fixed diameter gauge 30B.

It is to be noted that the inturned flange or leg portion 37B of the diameter sizing member is tapered so that the width thereof is progressively increased as it approaches the coin opening 36. When a coin C1 of proper size is inserted in the coin chute 25 and it begins to roll down the inclined bottom wall 34 thereof, it is guided therealong by having one edge of the coin C1 rolling against plate 21, and the increasing width of the inturned flange 37B of the diameter sizer plate 37 will cause the inclined coin C1 rolling down the ledge 34 to straighten or to assume an upright position so that it may pass through the coin discharge opening 36 that leads it to the passageway 28 for receiving the acceptable coins.

In the event a coin C3 inserted in the coin chute 25 described is formed with a diameter which is less than that of an acceptable coin, the undersized coin C3 will be prohibited from reaching the discharge coin opening 36 because the undersized coin C3 will pass beneath the inturned flange 37B of the diameter sizer means and thus will fail to become straightened as it rolls along the ledge. Due to the inclination of the undersized coin as it rolls down the ledge 34 the coin will fall through the cutout portion 31 in the hinged plate, and is therefore, guided by means of a suitable rail 42 connected to the flange 32 of the hinged plate 22 to the passageway 29 in which unacceptable coins are received. Thus, it will be noted that the coaction of the thickness sizer 33 and the diameter sizer 37 located below and above the cutout portion 31 of the hinge plate 22 respectively function to gauge the diameter of a coin so that only coins of proper diameters are permitted to pass through the coin chute 25 and discharge into the passageway 28 for receiving acceptable coins. Coins C2 with oversized diameter are hung up in the coin chute 25 by the projecting leg 138A, and means are provided whereby the same may clear as will be hereinafter described.

Means are also provided for gauging the coins inserted into the coin chute for proper thickness. The arrangement is such that coins C4 having a thickness greater than that of an acceptable coin are hung up in the coin chute 25; thereby requiring the hung up coin to be subsequently cleared as will be hereinafter described. Coins C5 having a thickness which is less than that of an acceptable coin C1 are caused to be wedged between the hinged plate 22 and the fixed plate 21 thereby prohibiting the same from passing through the coin rejecting mechanism. Coins C5 are also required to be subsequently cleared as hereinafter described.

The means for gauging for coin thickness comprise a pair of adjustable dial means 143 and 144. As best noted in FIG. 6, dial means 143 includes a relatively large dial 143A which is connected to a threaded shank 143B which threads through a suitable tapped hole formed in the fixed plate. A coiled spring 143C is interposed between the dial 143A and the fixed wall 21. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 4, it will be noted that the dial 143A is provided with a plurality of spaced markings or indicia 143D thereon which are keyed or coded to the width of the gauge notch 30D of the fixed thickness gauge 30C. The arrangement of the dial means 143 is such that by effecting rotation thereof in one direction or the other the head of the thread shank is moved inwardly or outwardly of the coin chute 25, accordingly. Thus the space defined between the head of the shank 143B and the inclined wall determines the coin thickness permitted to pass through the coin chute 25.

The other dial means 144 is provided to adjust the spacing of the hinged plate 22 relative to the fixed wall 21 to define a means whereby coins C2 having a thickness less than that of an acceptable coin are prohibited from passing through the coin chute 25. As shown dial means 144 is provided with a relatively smaller dial head 144A and connected threaded shank 144B which has the end thereof threaded through a tapped hole in the fixed plate 21. The arrangement is such that the end of shank 144B engages the hinged plate, and the spacing between the hinged plate and the fixed wall 21 is determined by the setting of the dial means 144. To facilitate the setting of the dial means 144, the dial head 144A is provided with suitable markings 144D, and a coil spring 144C is disposed about shank 144B. Thus if a coin having a thickness greater than the spacing defined between the end of the screw 143B and the hinged plate is inserted in the coin chute, it will be unable to pass therethrough, and the coin will hang up on the screw 143B due to the peripheral or circumferential edge of the coin being stopped by the leading edge of element 39 or element 138A. See FIG. 7. Thus, coins with too great a thickness will be prohibited from passing through the coin chute 25 of the coin rejecting mechanism.

Accordingly, by turning the screw 144B in one direction or the other the hinge plate 22 may be pivoted toward or away from the fixed plate. As a result the adjusting screw 144B controls the spacing 45 between the ledge 34 defining the bottom of the chute 25 and the inside surface of the fixed plate 21 as best seen in FIG. 5. The spacing 45 defined between the ledge 34 and the wall of the fixed plate 21 is utilized to gauge the thickness of undersized coin C5. Coin C5 with undersized thickness, i.e. too thin a coin, is thus caused to be wedged in the spacing 45 between the ledge and the fixed plate. This is attributed to the fact that whenever a coin having a thickness less than that of an acceptable coin is deposited in the coin chute 25, the inclination of the edge 34 of the bottom wall or ledge toward the fixed plate 21 causes the lower end of the too thin coin to become wedged in the space 45. Accordingly, if thickness of the coin is less than the width of the space 45 defined by the adjusting screw 144, the coin will either become wedged between the ledge 34 and the fixed plate 21 or fall through the space 45. Consequently, if it hangs up in the coin chute 25, it will leave to be cleared as will be hereinafter described.

To prohibit the passage of coins or slugs formed of a ferrous material through the coin rejecting mechanism, a magnetic means is disposed adjacent the coin chute 25 for attracting thereto any such ferrous slug or coin. As shown, a permanent magnet 46 is supported in suitable bracket 47 adjacent to opening 48 provided in the fixed plate 21. Accordingly, any coin rolling down the coin chute 25 and made of ferrous material will be attracted to the permanent magnet 46 so positioned, and thus be prohibited from passage thereof through the coin rejecting mechanism. In such event, the ferrous slug is required to be cleared from the magnet 46 as will be hereinafter described.

A means is provided for clearing the coin rejecting mechanism 20 in the event undersized or improperly sized coins are hung up in the coin chute for any of the reasons herein mentioned. The clearing means comprises a reject lever 51 which is pivotally mounted to the fixed plate 21 about a pivot pin 52; and the lever 51 is normally maintained in its inoperative position by means of a spring 53. Accordingly, the spring 53 is coiled about the pivot pin 52 so that one end of the spring is biased beneath the finger portion 51A of the rejecting lever 51 and the other end of the spring 53 is fixed on the magnet bracket 47. The arrangement is such that the normal tension of the spring 53 biases the lever 51 to its inoperative position.

Cooperatively associated with the reject lever 51 is a wiper lever 54. As shown, the wiper lever 54 is pivoted to the inside of the fixed plate 21 about a pivot pin 55. The wiper lever 54 is provided with a slotted opening 54A for receiving a pin 56 carried by reject lever 51, the pin 56 being extended through a slotted opening 57 form in the fixed plate member 21. Accordingly, the arrangement is such that whenever the reject lever 51 is depressed, the depression thereof will cause the displacement of the wiper lever 54 about its pivot 55 to wipe any slug or coin attracted to the magnet 46 free thereof. Also, the hinged plate 22 is provided with an inclined cam surface or tab 59 which is adapted to be cammed by the actuating pin 56 of the rejector lever 51. In operation whenever the reject lever 51 is depressed, the actuating pin 56 engaging the inclined tab 59 of the hinge plate 22 will cam the hinge plate 22 outwardly and away from the fixed plate 21. Accordingly, any undersized or oversized coin which is hung up in the coin chute 25 is thus freed, so that the same may be directed into the passageway 29 for receiving the unacceptable coins. As shown, the portion 60 of the fixed wall plate 21 is angularly bent inwardly thereof so as to define a deflector plate or flap which will deflect any coin hung up in the coin chute to passageway 29 for receiving the unacceptable coins. The coins received in the unacceptable passageway 29 are thus ultimately directed to a coin return slot which is cooperatively associated therewith.

From the foregoing it is to be noted that a mechanical coin rejecting mechanism 20 is set forth which will mechanically gauge coins for proper thicknesses and proper diameter so that only coins of predetermined thickness and predetermined diameter are permitted to pass through the coin rejecting mechanism. Any coin of improper thickness or of improper diameter is thus prohibited from passing through the coin rejecting means.

If desired, an electromagnet means (not shown) may be cooperatively associated with the coin rejecting mechanism so that upon insertion of the predetermined number of coins required to initiate a machine cycle, the electromagnet is energized to interpose a cover plate which covers the acceptable passageway. In this event, insertion of additional coins will be immediately bypassed to the coin return passageway 29 and be directed to the return mechanism of the vending machine or the like. In this manner, assurance is had that no more than the required amount of coins can be accepted.

From the foregoing, it will be noted that the coin rejecting mechanism 20 is relatively simple in construction and it is provided with means for mechanically gauging coins for proper thicknesses and for proper diameters. Accordingly, unless a coin has the prescribed material, thickness and proper size diameter, it will not be permitted to pass through the coin rejecting mechanism. Further, the coin rejecting mechanism described is provided with a gauging means which may be adjusted to accommodate various coins of prescribed thicknesses and/or diameters in a relatively simple and economic manner.

Certain unscrupulous individuals frequently attempt to find ways to defeat the coin rejector mechanism. One way which has been found was to tie a filament or string to a properly sized coin prior to depositing the same. With the coin so secured, the unscrupulous person would then seek to retrieve the coin after the cycle of the machine has been actuated by pulling the coin back from the coin meter by its attached string. To prohibit such acts, a string cutter 150 is provided. As best seen in FIG. 12 the string cutter 150 comprises a notch cutting blade which is suitably secured to the end of the bottom portion or sizing plate 33 so that a string attached to any otherwise acceptable coin is received in the notched portion 151 of the cutter 150. As best seen in FIG. 12 one edge of the cutter is angled so that upon any reverse pull or force applied to the string in retrieving the secure coin will cause the string to be severed; thereby causing the coin so secured to drop into the acceptable coin passageway. Also included is a deflector screw 160.

In the construction described the dial means 143 and 144, and the adjustment of the diameter sizer means 37 is such that the same can be readily set to a particular coin thickness and diameter by the following instructions:

In order to effect the standard adjustment of the coin rejector mechanism 20 described, the large dial means or dial wheel 143A is rotated clockwise as viewed in FIG. 1 until it stops. The small dial wheel 144A is likewise rotated clockwise as far as it can turn as viewed in FIG. 1. The deflector screw 160 is also rotated clockwise until it stops. In the event that the deflector screw 160 is obstructed by the diameter size plate 37, the latter may be raised out of the way as viewed in FIG. 1.

To determine the coin diameter of a particular coin C1 for which the rejector mechanism is to be adjusted, the coin C1 is set on the ledge 30A to rest against gauge marking 30B whereby the line nearest to the top of the coin is noted. Accordingly, the two screws 38 securing the diameter sizing means 37 to the hinged plate 22 are loosened so that the diameter sizer plate 37 may be moved up or down until its respective left and right hand bottom edges 137B are on or near the appropriate marking of indicia 31A, 31B corresponding to the marking 30B indicated by the fixed diameter gauging means 30C. For example, a quarter or 25 cent piece of U.S. currency measures approximately to line -5 of gauge 30B when it is placed on the ledge 30A. For such a coin, the diameter sizer 37 is adjusted relative to the hinged plate 22 by moving the same until the lower right and left bottom edges 137B thereof coincide with a setting -5 of indicia 31A and 31B. The screws 38 for securing the diameter sizer 37 are then tightened to secure the diameter sizer 37 in the adjusted position thereof. The prescribed coin C1 is then gauged for thickness by resorting to the fixed thickness gauge 30C provided on the coin rejector 20.

If the prescribed coin C1 fits or is received in the gauge slot 30D of the fixed thickness gauge 30C, the small dial wheel 144A is rotated in a counterclockwise direction 4 increments, as indicated. If the coin C1 does not fit into the slot 30D of the fixed coin thickness gauge 30C, then the small dial wheel is rotated counterclockwise 8 increments. It will be noted that the relative rotation of the small dial wheel 144A will vary a spacing 45 between the hinged plate 22 and the fixed wall 21 of the rejector 20, accordingly. The prescribed coin C1 is then dropped into the coin chute 25 of the rejector and the coin C1 should pass through.

If the coin C1 does not pass through, then the indication is that the diameter sizer 37 has been set too low, in which case the diameter sizer 37 is raised slightly. After this adjustment the prescribed coin C1 is again dropped into the rejector and the coin should pass through.

However, in the event the coin C1 falls through the opening 31 of the hinged panel 22, the indication is that the diameter sizer 37 has been set too high. Accordingly, the diameter sizer 37 may then be lowered slightly, and the prescribed coin C1 dropped into the rejector. The coin should then pass through without difficulty.

To set the rejector for coin thickness the small dial wheel 144A is rotated counterclockwise until it stops. The prescribed coin C1 is then dropped into the rejector.

If the coin does not pass through the coin chute 25, the small dial wheel 144A is rotated counterclockwise until the coin is permitted to pass through the rejector plus another 2 to 4 increments as indicated by the markings on the small dial wheel 144A. If the prescribed coin passes through the rejector mechanism when the prescribed coin C1 is deposited, the small dial wheel is rotated counterclockwise 4 increments.

The large dial wheel 143A is then rotated counterclockwise sufficiently to prevent a coin C1 from passing through the rejector. Then the large dial wheel 143A is rotated clockwise sufficiently to permit the coin to pass through the rejector.

The deflector screw 160 adjustment is made only when the diameter sizer is positioned on lines 4 to 10. This is effected by turning the deflector screw 160 counterclockwise until it stops a coin from passing through the rejector. Then the deflector adjustment screw 160 is turned clockwise sufficiently to permit the coin to pass through the rejector. When these adjustments have been made the prescribed coin should properly pass through the coin rejector 20. This may be tested by passing the prescribed coin C1 through the rejector several times thereby assuring that all the adjustments have been satisfactorily made.

To effect very fine adjustments of the coin rejector mechanism 20 it is suggested that the procedure for the standard adjustments be first carried out as herein described.

To reject coins that are slightly undersize in diameter or oversize in diameter the following procedure may be followed: Loosen the screws 38 securing the diameter sizer 37 and raise the diameter sizer 37 slightly. The tighten the screws 38. Drop the proper coin into the rejector and note if the coin passes through. If the coin does not pass through the rejector lower the diameter sizer until the coin does pass through. Then loosen the screws 139 and 140 that hold the fine adjustment arm 138 and over the pointer thereof slightly below zero marking 141 and then tighten the screws 139 and 140.

Drop the proper coin into the rejector and note to see if the coin passes through. If the coin does pass through the rejector raise the pointer until the coin does not pass through. Several oversize and undersize coins are dropped into the rejector to check to see that they are rejected.

For wide range adjustments, i.e. for coins with different diameters, it is suggested the procedure for the standard adjustments be followed using a coin with smaller diameter before making any wide range adjustments. After making standard adjustments proceed with the following steps using the larger coin. Loosen the screws 139, 140 that hold the fine adjustment arm 138 and move the pointer above the zero line 141 and then tighten the screw 139, 140. Drop the larger coins into the rejector and note if the coins pass through. If the coin does not pass through, screws 139, 140 are loosened and the pointer raised to a slightly higher position higher position until the prescribed coin is permitted to pass through the rejector mechanism.

With the mechanism described and the procedure to be utilized in setting the same, it is to be noted that the rejector mechanism may be readily set to receive a prescribed coin without the necessity of going through a tedious and time consuming trial and error method for the setting of the rejector mechanism to a prescribed coin.

While the instant invention has been described with respect to a particular embodiment thereof it will be readily appreciated and understood that variations and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention.