Title:
Amusement device
United States Patent 2495967


Abstract:
This invention relates to improvements in amusement devices and this application is a continuation in part of application Serial Number 101,427 filed June 25, 1949. One object of the invention is the provision of an amusement device which includes a handle, and an element secured thereto which...



Inventors:
Hamilton, Roger A.
Application Number:
US11798049A
Publication Date:
01/31/1950
Filing Date:
09/27/1949
Assignee:
Hamilton, Roger A.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F9/00
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
1718792Toy1929-06-25
1543052N/A1925-06-23
0389806N/A1888-09-18
0350344N/A1886-10-05



Foreign References:
FR754191A1933-10-31
Description:

This invention relates to improvements in amusement devices and this application is a continuation in part of application Serial Number 101,427 filed June 25, 1949.

One object of the invention is the provision of an amusement device which includes a handle, and an element secured thereto which will, by moving the handle endwise and suddenly stopping such movement, be extended into the air in the form of an inverted cone, the apex of which is said handle; the inverted cone, due to a certain set inherently built into said element, tending to return or retract to its initial position on the handle.

The element secured on the handle is comprised of a web of material which is in the form of a helix and which is tempered or "set" so that it always tends to return to its initial closed helical form. The inner end of the web forming the helix is secured to the handle, and the handle has secured thereon a washer or disc which is larger in diameter than the closed helix and forms a continuous ledge upon which the helix normally "bottoms." One of the objects. of the invention is the 28 provision of a device of the character described, which may be repetitively extended and retracted. The extension of the element is in accordance with the endwise impulse exerted. For example, if a comparatively light impulse is employed, the helical web extends outwardly from the end of the handle a distance less than it would extend under the urge of heavier impulses Within certain limits it has been found that as the plane in which the element is extended approaches the horizontal, the slower it retracts.

This is believed to be due to the fact that the friction between the contacting convolutions of friction betfween the contacting convolutions of the web increases and tends to overcome the springiness or set of the helical element.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a novelty toy with which both old and young may derive much amusement, and with which their skill increases with increased use of the toy.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art upon a study of this specification and the accompanying drawings, Referring to the drawings which illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention: Figure 1 is an end view of my novelty toy; Figure 2 is a sectional elevation taken along the lines 2-2 of Figure 1; Figure 3 is a perspective view, partially broken away, of the toy shown in Figures 1 and 2; and Figure 4 is a erspective vie, showing the helical web element of the toy in an extended state from which said element retracts to its normal position on the handle.

Referring first to Figures 1 to 3, the active element 0 of the toy is comprised of an elongate d web I which is formed into a lurality of convolutions 12 in a close helical array and processed to impart toa c set, which causes it to reassue t i tto itial close which causl fo es it cially when distorted or distended axially from said form.

Although various metallic or non-metallic materials may be employed, I prefer to make my active element of a comparatively thin plastic material having comparatively high tensile strength, great resiliency and flexibility and the friction between the contacting surfaces of the convolutions must be comparatively small so as to allow the element 10 to be extended axially to a reasonable length under the urge of a given impulse. I have obtained excellent results with active elements formed of webs of plasticized vinyl plastic material in the neighborhood of 0.005" thick, and have "set" the material to retain its close helical form by heat treating the same.

The element 10 is mounted on a handle 15 by securing the inner convolution i3 thereof to the upper portion 18 of said handle by means of an adhesive, or in any other suitable manner.

When so mounted, the lower end of the element 10 rests on a disc 16 which is secured to the handle at a point intermediate the ends thereof, leaving a free handle portion 17 below it which may be grasped by the user's hand. The outer end 14 of the element 10 is free, as shown. end 14 of the element 10 is free, as shown.

The web I I may be decorated in various ways, for example, by making a strip A, adjacent to Wo one end one color; a strip B, adjacent to the other end another or the same; and the portion C, therebetween a color contrasted with the other colors for novel and leasing effects. r e 45 Operation With the fingers of the user's hand embracingly grasping the portion II of the handle 15 and with the thumb engaging the rim of the disc 16, the hand is suddenly moved forward, there50 by moving the toy endwise or axially (In the direction of the arrow in Figure 4)0then sudenly stopping the hand (without releasing the handle) -thereby subjecting the element i0 only to the impulse. This causes the element to be 55 extended in the form of an inverted cone, the 9,496 3 outer end 14 being part of the base of the cone and the apex remaining on the handle, due to the fact that the inner end 13 of the element is secured to the handle. When the element is extended, the convolutions approach the form of a conical spiral which has an appearance somewhat like that shown in Figure 4.

As soon as the impulse is spent, the conical spiral ceases to increase in length and immediately the inherent urge, in the material of which I the element 10 is formed, causes it to return to its initial position. Usually the inverted cone is launched in a direction between the horizontal and the vertical, therefore the urge is abetted by the force of gravity.

The user, by repetitive use of the device may develop the ability to effect unusual effects and perform many amusing tricks with the toy. For example, one such trick is as follows: As soon as the element has been extended in the form of the inverted cone (as described above) and before it starts back to its normal position, it may be kept in the extended condition by moving the hand circularly so that such circular motion is imparted to the toy. This circular motion combined with the friction between the convolutions, in effect is slightly greater than said inherent urge. Then when this motion is decreased or stopped, the inherent urge effects the return of the element to its initial close helical state.

Although I have herein shown and described one embodiment of the invention, many variations in the arrangements shown may be made within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is: 1. In a toy of the character described, an active element comprised of a web of resilient material formed into a plurality of convolutions each of which is in light frictional contact with its neighbors, said material being set or tempered to cause it to exist in the form of a helix when in normal repose and to cause it to tend to return to its helical form when forces exerted axially thereon to distort it become less than the inherent urge Ifroduced in said material by the temper thereof, a handle having a portion thereof extending into and secured to the innermost of said convolutions, and an abutment member carried on said handle forming a support for one edge of said helical i,967 4 band when the latter is in said normal repose with its axis approaching a vertical plane.

2. In an amusement device of the character described, an active element comprised of a comparatively thin web of resilient plastic material formed into a plurality of convolutions each of which is in light frictional contact with its neighbors, said material being set or tempered to cause it to exist in the form of a helix when in normal .0 repose and to cause it to tend to return to its helical form when any portion thereof is distorted axially, and a handle having an axis mounted on the axis of said helix, and having an extension upon which the inner convolution of said helix is mounted.

3. In an amusement device of the character described, an active element comprised of a comparatively thin web of resilient plastic material formed into a plurality of convolutions each of which is in light frictional contact with its neighbors, said material being set or tempered to cause it to exist in the form of a helix when in normal repose and to cause it to tend to return to its helical form when any portion thereof is distorted axially, a handle having its axis coinciding with the axis of said helix, and having an abutment member mounted thereon for supporting one edge of said helical band when said device is held in an upright position, said handle further ;u having a portion above said abutment member serving as a mounting for the inner convolution of said helix.

ROGER A. HAMILTON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 350,344 389,806 1,543,052 1,718,792 Name Date Caldwell ------------- Oct. 5, 1886 Hale -------------- Sept. 18,1888 Brown ------------- June 23, 1925 Main ------------- June 25, 1929 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Dateu 754,191 France ------------ Aug. 21,1933