Title:
Tone bar for guitars and the like
United States Patent 2490517


Abstract:
The present invention relates to a tone bar for guitars, and the like, particularly of the type employed for producing tones characteristic of the so-called Hawaiian guitar. An object of the invention is to provide a tone bar in which suitable material of proper density may be employed for...



Inventors:
Garcia, Henry J.
Application Number:
US76461547A
Publication Date:
12/06/1949
Filing Date:
07/30/1947
Assignee:
Garcia, Henry J.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
984/110
International Classes:
G10D3/00
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2184733Steel for musical instruments1939-12-26
2073331Tone bar1937-03-09
1834252Guitar tone bar1931-12-01
1492274Bar for stringed instruments1924-04-29



Description:

The present invention relates to a tone bar for guitars, and the like, particularly of the type employed for producing tones characteristic of the so-called Hawaiian guitar. An object of the invention is to provide a tone bar in which suitable material of proper density may be employed for obtaining true tones, and, which at the same time, has the proper weight and balance to permit the production of true tones with greater ease, comfort, dexterity and accuracy than has been possible with tone bars heretofore in use.

A further object is to provide a tone bar which will not become slippery from perspiration, and to this end it is proposed to employ brass or other suitable material which becomes sticky from perspiration rather than slippery, and thus aids in holding of the bar and preventing it from slipping out of the hand while playing. Another object is to provide a tone bar of generally cylindrical form having radii on its ends which permit all-around use of the bar, and easy maneuverability across the strings of the instrument.

A further object is to provide a tone bar having a plurality of ranges of tone, and to this end it is proposed to combine different materials, as for instance brass and steel, in the single tone bar and in such relation that by simply turning the tone bar in the hand the desired range of tone may be produced. In the case of using brass and steel, the brass produces a relatively mellow tone, while the steel produces a sharper tone.

With the above and other objects in view, embodiments of the invention are shown in the accompanying drawings, and these embodiments will be hereafter more fully described with reference thereto, and the invention will be finally pointed out in the claims.

In the drawingsFig. 1 is a side elevation of a tone bar, according to one embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 2 is an end view thereof.

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section view.

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of a modified form of the invention.

Fig. 5 is an end view thereof.

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section view.

Fig. 7 is a side elevation of another modified form of the invention.

Fig. 8 is an end view thereof.

Fig. 9 is a longitudinal section view.

Fig. 10 is a side elevation of still another modifled form of the invention.

Fig. 11 is an end view thereof.

Fig. 12 is a longitudinal section view.

Similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several figures of the drawings.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs 1 to 3 thereof, the tone bar illustrated therein comprises a cylindrical bar 10 having radii 11-11 at its ends, and having an axial cylindrical hole 12 extending therethrough. The tone bar may be constructed of any suitable material, but is preferably formed of brass which has the characteristic that perspiration from the hands causes it to become sticky rather than slippery, and it can therefore be securely held and manipulated upon the strings of the instrument.

The hole 12 is of such size as to give to the bar the desired balance and weight, permitting it to be manipulated with ease, comfort, dexterity and accuracy, and at the same time without sacrifice of necessary density of its metal structure to produce the desired tonal effect. The cylindrical shape of the bar enables its use in any position of turning and the radii at its ends permit easy maneuverability across the strings.

In Figs. 4 to 6 there is illustrated a modified form of the invention in which the desired balance and weight of the bar is obtained by providing an axial cylindrical hole 13 extending from one end into spaced relation with the other end, its open end being closed by a plug 4, preferably formed of the same material as the bar. This 3o plug is of corresponding thickness to the thickness of the closed end of the bar at the opposite end of the hole 13, so that a substantial balancing of the ends of the bar is obtained.

In Figs. 7 to 9 there is shown a modification of g3 the invention, in which the bar comprises a body part 15, formed of a desired metal or other suitable material, as for instance brass, and a segmental part 16, formed of another desired material, as for instance steel, the outer surface of the two parts being of cylindrical form, and the body part 15 preferably having a hole therein to give the bar the desired balance and weight.

This hole may be of the type shown in Figs. 1 to 3, or of the type shown in Figs. 4 to 6, the latter ,5 type being illustrated. The two parts of the bar are joined by welding, brazing, or other suitable means and the plane along which they are joined is preferably outside of the hole 13. The bar of this modification is such that it can be easily o5 turned to bring either part into engagement with the strings, and at the same time the gripping surface at each side will be of the material of the body part 15, as for instance brass. Thus in the case of the segmental part 16 being con66 structed of steel or similar material which becomes slippery from perspiration, the bar will have the advantage provided by employing brass or similar material as the body part, and which becomes sticky from perspiration.

In Figs. 10 to 12 there is illustrated a further modified form of the invention, in which the bar is of cylindrical shape having radii at its ends, in corresponding manner to the other forms of the invention, and consists of a body part 17, formed of plastic or other suitable light weight material, and a segmental part 18, of brass, steel, or other suitable material secured to it by cementing or the like. Because of the lightness of the plastic material, the proper weight and balance may be obtained without providing a hole therein.

I have illustrated and described preferred and satisfactory embodiments of the invention, but it will be understood that changes may be made therein, within the spirit and scope thereof, as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is: 1. A tone bar for stringed instruments, comprising a body portion of a given tone producing material, and a segmental portion of another tone producing material joined to said body portion, said joined portions having diametrically opposed external string engaging surface.

2. A tone bar for stringed instruments, comprising a body portion of brass, and a segmental portion of steel joined to said body portion, said joined portions diametrically opposed external string engaging surface.

3. A tone bar for stringed instruments, comprising a body portion of plastic material and a segmental portion of metal joined to said body portion, said joined portions having a cylindrical external string engaging surface.

4. A tone bar for stringed instruments, comprising a body portion of a given tone producing material, and a segmental portion of another tone producing material joined to said body portion, said joined portions having diametrically opposed external string engaging surface, there being an axial hole in said body portion of said bar.

5. A tone bar for stringed instruments, comprising a body portion of a given tone producing material, and a segmental portion of another tone producing material joined to said body portion, said joined portions having diametrically opposed external string engaging surface, there being an axial hole in said body portion of said bar, said hole terminating at one end in spaced relation to one end of said bar and having a closure plug secured in its other end.

HENRY J. GARCIA.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: Number 1,492,274 1,834,252 2,073,331 2,184,733 UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Sullivan ___----- _ Apr. 29, 1924 Morgan -------___ Dec. 1, 1931 Allen ------------ Mar. 9, 1937 Burgien -- _____- . Dec. 26, 1939