Title:
Arrow nock
United States Patent 2484589


Abstract:
This invention relates to new and improved arrow nocks. Objects of the invention include the provision of a new and improved nock constructed and arranged to provide a comfortable finger grip which will not squeeze the.fingers as in the conventional nock, so that sore fingers are obviated...



Inventors:
Richards, Kenneth D.
Application Number:
US57723745A
Publication Date:
10/11/1949
Filing Date:
02/10/1945
Assignee:
Richards, Kenneth D.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
D21/387
International Classes:
F42B6/06
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2245187Arrow nock1941-06-10
1542159Archer's arrow nock and finger grip1925-06-16
1328967Arrow1920-01-27



Foreign References:
GB188600172A
Description:

This invention relates to new and improved arrow nocks.

Objects of the invention include the provision of a new and improved nock constructed and arranged to provide a comfortable finger grip which will not squeeze the.fingers as in the conventional nock, so that sore fingers are obviated in archery and a smoother release and greater accuracy result; the provision of an improved nock providing a more secure finger grip thereon and which allows quicker nocking on the bow string while at the same time providing against accidental slipping of the arrow, said nock feeling and actually being more securely held than those of the prior art and therefore again Increasing accuracy; and the provision of a new arrow nock having a tip indicating the position of the cock feather, said tip being so arranged as to be quickly and easily recognized both visually and tactilely, so that the cock feather is more easily and quickly found than in prior art arrows.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear hereinafter.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawing in which Fig. 1 is an enlarged view in side elevation of an arrow nock according to my invention; Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the nock of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 illustrates the nock in place on the arrow; and Fig. 4 illustrates the nock in use; Pig. 5 is a side elevation of a modified form of the invention; Fig. 6 is a top view of the nock .of Fig. 5.

As seen in Figures 1 and 2, the new and improved arrow nock comprises a cylindrical body portion I0 having a depression 12 for receiving the feather end of one arrow shaft 14. The opposite end of the nock provides the novel.construction of the nock herein disclosed.

The sides of the nock in the area of the fingers of the archer are made substantially flat and generally parallel see 16 and J8. However, it is preferred that the opposite flat sides shouid -be curved to diverge forwardly to merge into the outline of the cylindrical body portion, see :20, both for appearance and to form a flat trough or channel for the fingers. Hence the flat sides described are actually identations formed at opposite sides of the cylindrical body portion, and it is to be understood that the sides need not be flat, but preferably they should have a portion wherein they -are substantially parallel as at the thinnest section of the nock. In the nock illustrated, the sides are in curved diverging planes.

As shown in Fig. 4, the archer's fingers straddle the nock adjacent the closest approach of the sides 16 and 18 and these sides give the fingers comfortable surfaces of relatively large extent instead of rounded surfaces as in the conventional nock. Hence the fingers are not squeezed against an unnaturally shaped surface as the bow is bent but merely grip the flat sides 16 and 18 to a greater degree, and it will be clear that the present nock will not cause sore fingers regardless of the pressure exerted. Equally clearly the fingers will be allowed to provide .a smoother release and this results in greater accuracy, as the smoothness of the release is the secret of good shooting.

The sides 16 and .18 also diverge at points 24, 26 to provide gripping surfaces for the fingers.

This construction results in flared ends forming a wider element in the nature of a finger stop, this element preventing slipping of the arrow and resulting in keeping the arrow on the string snugly at all times. Hence perfect control of the arrow is achieved and accidental release or other malfunction is rendered extremely unlikely. Obviously the flared ends enhance the smoothness of release due to better control and a greater feeling of security and grip. Also, the arrow is capable of quicker and more accurate nocking, as the archer need not make an effort to grip the nock in the right manner, this being substantially automatic.

The lower .surface of the nock is relieved at 28, thus avoiding interference with the bow, and in this region of the nock the opposite surface is curved upwardly as at 30, the string notch being located centrally of the arrow and between the tip 30 and surface 28. The curved tip is located in line with the cock feather 32, and may be formed by a depression 34. The curved tip provides an easily seen and felt indicator for locating the cock feather, and in combination with the flat sides IS and 13 achieves a construction providing for instant correct holding of the nock without thought or care.

It will be apparent from the above description and disclosure that this invention presents a great improvement over conventional nocks which tend to roll in the fingers and which are made so that the fingers.tend to slide from the narrow rear ends thereof. Also, the usual squeezing of the fingers against the convex sides of the known nocks is avoided, .and the flat slim end and body of the present invention permits the smoothest release possible, a smooth release being the sine qua non of good archery. The flaced ends provide for perfect control at all times and there is never any .need to search for 2,484,589 3 the cock feather due to the flat sides and curved tip.

A different form of arrow nock is illustrated in Figures 5 and 6 wherein the body 10 is substantially the same, and the finger grip side surfaces are similar to those described. However, the end of the nock is here shown as symmertical, the surfaces 36 and 38 being formed on similar curves, instead of having the upper or cock feather indicating surface extending upwards. A tail rudderlike element 40 acts as the indicator in Figures and 6 and is capable of being seen or felt just the same as the part 30 and for the same reasons, In addition, the flared end at 38, Fig. 6, is more pronounced, and in Fig. 5 it is disclosed how the name and registration number of the owner are provided for, as well as the number of the arrow, for easy and quick identification.

Having thus described my invention and the advantages thereof, I do not wish to be limited to the details herein disclosed, otherwise than as set forth in the claims, but what I claim is: 1. An arrow nock having lateral depressions for accommodating the fingers, said depressions forming therebetween a substantially reduced 25 finger grip portion, and a projection between the depressions alined with the cock feather, said projection being in a position to be engaged manually when the arrow is ready to be projected.

2. An arrow nock having a bow string notch at 30 one end thereof, and a finger gripping portion adjacent the notched end, the finger gripping portion being in the form of a depressed part extending lengthwise of the nock, and merging into the body of the nock at one end, and into the 35 notched rear end at the other, a portion at least of said depressed part being flattened transversely of the notch.

S3. An arrow nock having a bow string notch at one end thereof, and a finger gripping portion adjacent the notched end, the finger gripping portion being in the form of a depressed part extending lengthwise of the nock, and merging into the body of the nock at one end, and into the notched rear end at the other, a portion at least of said depressed part being flattened transversely of the notch, said nock being enlarged at the notched end to provide a finger stop at the termination of the finger griing a gng portion.

4. An arrow nock having a generally cylindrical shape with a reduced end, lateral depressions appearing in the nock adjacent the reduced end thereof, said depressions presenting a reduced finger hold, a projection at the rear end of the nock to indicate the cock feather, said depressions 55 forming finger abutments at the small end of the nock when the bow string is retracted to project the arrow.

5. An arrow nock having its trailing end reduced, a notch in the reduced end, a radial projec- 60 tion extending outwardly from said reduced end, a finger hold forwardly of the reduced end, said projection lying in position to be engaged by the thumb when the fingers are in place on the finger hold and in position to indicate the position of 65 the cock feather.

6. An arrow nock having a pair of oppositely disposed concave depressions adjacent the trailing end thereof forming a finger hold, said depressions extending lengthwise of the nock and 70 merging into the trailing end to form a finger stop, and being flattened transversely to prevent accidental rotation of the nock, and a bow string notch at the trailing end and extending into the depressions forming the finger hold, so that the 75 bow string will tend to press the fingers inwardly against the finger hold as the bow is bent.

7. In an arrow having a cock feather and a, nock, a reduced portion on the nock and a generally radial projection on the reduced portion,, said projection being alined with the cock feather and in position to be engaged by the thumb when the arrow is about to be projected.

8. An arrow having a cock feather and a nock, said nock having oppositely disposed depressed finger grip portions extending lengthwise of the nock and merging at their ends with the nock, portions at least of said depressions being flattened transversely to prevent accidental rotation of the arrow, said flattened portions lying on opposite sides of the plane of the cock feather and being substantially parallel therewith.

9. An arrow as recited-in claim 8, including a projection to the rear of said reduced portion, said projection being alined with the cock feather and' in position to be engaged by the thumb when the arrow is about to be projected.

10. An arrow as recited in claim 8 including a. widened part to the rear of the reduced flat portion, the latter being a finger hold and the widened part acting as a finger stop.

11. An arrow as recited in claim 8 including a flaring rear end on the nock, a projection on the flaring end in line with the cock feather and engaged by the thumb when the arrow is about to be loosed, and a transverse notch below the projection.

12. An arrow nock comprising an elongated solid body, having an arrow receiving portion at one end and a bow string notch at the other, said body being reduced at opposite sides for a substantial portion of its length from the notch toward the hollow end, forming a relatively thin finger grip portion transverse to the notch and in advance thereof, said reduced portions being symmetrically located on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of the nock, and being flattened transversely for at least a portion thereof, whereby corresponding lines in the respective flattened portions on opposite sides of the central axis and normal thereto are straight and parallel to each other, said flattened portion preventing accidental rotation of the nock.

50 13. The nock of claim 12 including a projection 0 in alinement with the cock feather of the arrow, said projection being in position to be engaged by the thumb of the archer as the arrow is about to be loosed.

l KENNETH D. RICHARDS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,328,967 Reaben -------- - Jan. 27, 1920 1,542,159 Maxwell ------_-- June 16, 1925 2,245,187 Donash -------- June 10, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 172 Great Britain ----------- 1886 OTHER REFERENCES "Archery," by Longman and Walrond, published in London by Longmans, Green, and Co., page 77, Fig. 64, 1894.