Title:
Sandal
United States Patent 2478664


Abstract:
SOur invention relates -to footwear, andt more particularly, although not necessarily, to sandals especially adapted for beach wear, and wherein the sole is made -up of articulated sections to Iend flexibility thereto. It is a purpose of our invention to provide a sandal having -a sole which...



Inventors:
Morrow, Fred E.
Wise, Clarence H.
Application Number:
US71886246A
Publication Date:
08/09/1949
Filing Date:
12/27/1946
Assignee:
Morrow, Fred E.
Wise, Clarence H.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
36/33
International Classes:
A43B3/12
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2377141Footwear1945-05-29
1964705Sandal1934-06-26
1964406Sandal1934-06-26



Foreign References:
GB189013576A
DE297864C
DE316784C
Description:

SOur invention relates -to footwear, andt more particularly, although not necessarily, to sandals especially adapted for beach wear, and wherein the sole is made -up of articulated sections to Iend flexibility thereto.

It is a purpose of our invention to provide a sandal having -a sole which is characterized by the construction of and the means for connecting the articulated sections, which give and -maaintain a top side -contour conforming to the -natural contour of the bottom of the foot when standing and -the varying contours assumed in walking, thus providing a sandal which forms an adequate support for the foot, and yet possesses the flexibility and comfort of a leather shoe.

It is also a purpose of our invention to pro-vide a sole for sandals in which the connecting means for the sole -sections comprises coiled springs secured under tension to so yieldingly connect the articulated sections that the sole as a whole -possesses a resilient flexibility that permits it to flex -with and under the normial bending movements of the foot in -walking, but restores it to an adequate foot supporting position when standing. As a consequence, the sole constantly conforms to one's foot .contour so as not to afford any impediment to one's walking in the -normal manner.

We will describe only one form of sandal embodying our in-,vention, and wJUl then point out the novel features thereof in ,claims.

In the accompanying drawings: Fig. 1 is a view showing in -top plan one form .of sandai embodying our invention.

Fig. 2 is a view showing the sandal in side elevation.

Fig. .3 is a longitudinal sectional view taken ,on the line 3-3 of Eig.-1.

Fig. 4 is.an enlarged fragmentary side elevation view -of the sandal sole.

With specific reference to the drawings, our invention in it present embodiment comprises a sandal having a sole, generally indicated at S, with any suitable means for attaching the sole to the foot of the wearer, such means, in the present instance, comprising an instep strap T and a toe strap TI, each of which is secured to the longitudinal edges of the sole by suitable fastening members F.

The sole S is made up of a multiplicity of articulated ribs or sections constructed of wood, plastic, or other suitable material having the required wearing properties, and a heel preferably formed of rubber which is secured to the sole by nails 15 or other suitable fastening members. The heel is adapted to be used only where the sections forming the heel of the sole-are of the same thickness as the remaning sections -of the sole.

To facilitate description of the mode-of operation of the sandal when in use, I shall separately designate the sole sections constituting the heel, the shank, and the toe supporting portions 'for j1 a foot. The heel supporting portion -may 'be made of one or more sections i16, while the shank portion is made up of sections 1 to 2- :-inclusive. The toe supporting portion is made up of sections 22 to 26 inclusive.

ia All of the sections of the sole are joined one to 'the other by means providing articulation between the sections, and this means, in the present instance, comprises two or more coiled contractile springs 21. Each spring is in the 'form 2o of a coiled wire, preferably a piano wire to provide the necessary strength, durability, and resiliency, and the two springs extend through :parallel bores 28 formed in the sections. It wil be particularly noted that these bores 28 are-nearer S5 the top of the sole :sections than the bottom so that the springs are correspondingly situated, and for a purpose to be described hereinafter.

Each spring 21 is of such length as to: ex-tend transversely through all of the sole seetions, with its ends terminating substantially flush with the outer edges of the outermost toe and heel sections. Such ends are secured in the aforesaid sections by corrugated brads 29, or oother :suitable fastening_ members, which are driven into the under sides of the sole-sections to bite into the 'spring ends and thus secure the latter against longitudinal: movement within, the .sole. In practice, it is essential that thesprings 23 be associated with. the .sole sections as to be constantly under tension so as to urge the raetions toward each other, and Eto this end the springs originally are longer than the sole so that by first securing one end of the springs in the toe section 26, for example, by the use of the brads 29, the other ends will project from the heel of the sole so that they can be pulled and the springs placed under tension. While the springs are under tension the brads 29 are applied to the heel section thus maintaining the springs under tension, and, following which, the projecting ends of the springs are cut off flush with the surface of the heel section.

In order that the sole S may have the general curvature of the bottom of the foot so as to support the foot when the wearer is standing, and also to allow the requisite flexing of the sole so that it is free to conform to the bending movements of the foot in walking, the shank sections 18 to 20 have their confronting edges slightly beveled in opposite directions transversely to normally leave narrow gaps between the sections at the under sides thereof. The confronting edges of the sections 20 and 21 are beveled in the same manner as the other sections, but to a greater degree as indicated at 31, in order that the contour of the sole at this point properly merges into the toe supporting portion of the sole. The sole sections forming the toe supporting portion of the sole, as well as the forward edge of the section 21, are all formed with coextensive longitudinal grooves of angular form to provide coextensive recesses 32. These recesses allow turning movement of the sections 22 to 26 in various degrees to permit the toe supporting portion of the sole, to conform to the bending movements of the toes of the wearer in walking.

In practice, the springs 27 being under tension as associated with the sole sections, urge such sections toward each other, and because they extend through the sections adjacent the upper sides thereof, they exert pulling forces transversely of the sections which, by virtue of the beveled edges 30 and 31 and the recessed edges 32 cause the sole to normally assume the general curvature of the bottom of the foot of the wearer.

Thus, normally the sole provides adequate support for the foot of the wearer when in a standing posture.

When the wearer is walking the resilient connections between the sections 17 to 26 provided by the springs 27, allow such flexing of the sole that it yields to and follows the bending movements of the foot, as not to interfere with or offer any discomfort to the wearer when walking.

In this sole flexing movement the recessed edges 32 allow upward turning movement individually of the sections 22 to 26, and to a degree than would otherwise be possible.

Because of the constant tension exerted by the springs on the sole sections, the sole is urged to the normal curvature shown in Fig. 2, and thus when the sole is not subjected to any bending movements as in walking, it automatically returns to its normal curvature to afford adequate support for the foot when standing. As a result a sandal constructed in accordance with our invention enables the wearer to walk or stand in comfort, and the sections can at no time pinch the flash of the wearer because of the constant tendency of the sections to assume their normal positions under the action of the springs, and thus close the joints between the sections in the upper sides thereof in advance of lowering movements of the foot.

Although we have herein shown and described only one form of sandal embodying our invention, it is to be understood that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of our invention and the spirit and scope of the appended claims: We claim: 1. A sandal having a sole, including: a multiplicity of transverse sections arranged in side to side relation, those sections forming the shank portion of the sole being beveled at their confronting sides at substantially the same angle but in opposed directions transversely thereof, those sections forming the toe and ball portions of the sole each having one side flat and the other side with a recess extending longitudinally thereof to form an edge at a point above the major axis of the sole providing a fulcrum about which the next section is adapted to pivot; and a plurality of coiled springs extending loosely through all of the sections at points above the major axis of the sole, and secured at their ends to the end sections of the sole so as to be under tension, whereby adjacent toe and ball sections are urged toward each other along lines above the major axis of the sole, and, hence, upwardly about said fulcrums to give normally an upward curvature to the ball and toe portions of the sole.

2. A sandal having a sole, including: a multiplicity of transverse sections arranged in side to side relation, with those sections forming the toe and ball portions of the sole having confronting sides one of which is formed with an edge at a point above the major axis of the sole to provide a fulcrum about which the adjacent section is adapted to pivot upwardly; and a plurality of coiled springs extending loosely through all of the sections at points above the major axis of the sole and secured at their ends to the end sections of the sole so as to be under tension, whereby adjacent toe and ball sections are urged toward each other along lines above tthe major axis of the sole, and, hence, upwardly about said fulcrums to give an upwardly curved contour to the ball and toe portions of the sole.

FRED E. MORROW.

CLARENCE H. WISE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the 50 file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 1,964,406 1,964,705 2,377,141 Number 13,576 297,864 316,784 Name Date Pellkofer ---------- June 26, 1934 Pellkofer -------- June 26, 1934 Geissman ---------- May 29, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain --- June 28, 1890 Germany --------May 30, 1917 Germany ----------- Dec. 3, 1919