Title:
Musical instrument
United States Patent 2474462


Abstract:
The main objects of this invention are: First, to provide a musical instrument which may be readily embodied in toys such as a toy piano and at the same time one which has desirable tone qualities and which may be made to quite accurately follow the musical scale and at the same time one which...



Inventors:
Brewer, John A.
Application Number:
US68996546A
Publication Date:
06/28/1949
Filing Date:
08/12/1946
Assignee:
Rozelda, Brewer A.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
84/423R, 984/156
International Classes:
B24B31/00; B24B31/02; G10D13/08
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2279144Toy piano1942-04-07
2260310Piano action1941-10-28
2159491Musical instrument1939-05-23
1444722N/A1923-02-06



Description:

The main objects of this invention are: First, to provide a musical instrument which may be readily embodied in toys such as a toy piano and at the same time one which has desirable tone qualities and which may be made to quite accurately follow the musical scale and at the same time one which is economical in its parts and easily assembled and capable of withstanding quite severe usage to which such toys are commonly subjected. Second, to provide an instrument in which the key. and hammer parts are easily mounted or assembled within the housing.

Third, to provide a structure in which a relatively light touch on the keys produces a substantial impact of the hammer or sound elements.

Objects relating to details and economies of the invention will appear from the description to follow. The invention is defined and pointed out in the claims.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated- in the accompanying drawing, in which: Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a toy piano embodying the invention, a portion of the top being broken away.

Fig. 2 is a view mainly in longitudinal section on a line corresponding to line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view corresponding to that of Fig. 2 with one of the hammers shown in full lines in partially actuated position and in its striking position by dotted lines.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view partially in horizontal section on line 4-4 of Fig. 2. 35: Fig. 5 is a perspective view of one of the key haimier units removed from the housing.

Fig. 6 is a view mainly in section on line 6-6 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view illustrating the engagement of the key and hammer.

Fig. 8 is a side elevational view of a modified form of key, the modification being in the positioning of the key pivot slot: In: the accompanying drawing, I have illustrated the invention as embodied in a toy piano.

This consists of a casing or housing comprising a bottom 'I and top 2, the bottom extending substantially beyond the top. The'end or side wall panels 3 have suitably conformed upper edges 4 and are secured between the bottom and top to provide a rigid connection for the top to the bottom.' The rear end edges of these panels 3 are providedwith gr6oves ;5 receiving the end edges of 55S the rear wall member S which is formed of bendable material, desirably a good grade of cardboard or fibreboard. The top and bottom edges of this conformed wall member 6 are engaged in' opposed grooves 7 and 8 provided'therefor in the top and bottom. Thus, the member 6 constitutes a supporting wall and also is securely retained in its conformed position, the instrument somewhat representing a grand piano in outline. This wall member 8 also constitutes a sounding board; The sound elements 9 are in the form of steel rods of graduated length and they are mounted in suitably spaced relation on the bar 10 which is glued to the under side of the top adjacent the front edge thereof.

The faceboard 1 is disposed between the panel 3 and secured thereto and also secured to the under side of the top. The front wall 12 is disposed between the front ends of the end members 3 and secured thereto and to the bottom. I have not attempted to illustrate the securing means as adhesive or glue with brads or other securing means may be used as desired. The legs 13 are secured to the bottom.

The keys 14 are formed with downwardly projecting arms 15 at their front ends, these arms being provided with longitudinal slots 16 and transverse slots I8, the transverse slots being of the key hole type-that'is, they have enlargements 18. The rear ends of the keys are provided with longitudinal slots 19-also of the key hole type; the slots 19 being adapted to be springably engaged with the key pivot rod 20.

In the modification shown in Fig. 8, the slots 21 corresponding to the slots 19 face downwardly, this being an advantage in the manufacture of the keys when they are manufactured of plastic material. The slots 17, 19 and 21 result in springable finger-like portions so that the keys may be engaged with a pivot rod or the pivots 22 of the hammers 23 may be engaged with a springing -or snap action, the pivots being effectively gripped so that there is no rattle or looseness. The hanmmers 23 are rod-like in shape and are provided with angled pivot arms 24 which are disposed in the slots 16 in the keys with the pivots 20 engaging the slots 17. The hammers have upturned ends 25 provided with spherical impact members 26 desirably of wood. Of course, it will be appreciated that other shapes of impact members and materials may be employed.

The heels 27 formed by the junction of the arms 24 :with the straight portion of the hammers' formk'fulcrums which fulcruii upon' the `combi)ed" cushioning and fulcruming strips 28 which may be in the form of thin felt secured to the bottom below the front ends of the keys so that they serve as buffers for the keys when they are depressed. The buffer strips are arranged to receive the return impact of the hammers.

When a key is depressed, the hammer fulcrums on its fulcruming heel and its inner end is swung upwardly-first swinging on the fulcrum and during the final part of the stroke swinging freely on its pivot so that a comparatively light touch results in a substantial striking momentum.

The sections 30 of the keys are commonly colored black to represent sharps although these sections are not intended or designed for manipulation. However, if two keys are depressed simultaneously with one finger a combination tone results.

The parts of the instrument are economical to produce and are easily and quickly assembled. I have not attempted to illustrate other types of instruments in which the invention might be embodied as it is believed the disclosure made will enable those skilled in the art to embody or adapt the invention as may be desired.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is: 1. A musical instrument comprising a housing including a bottom, sound elements disposed within the housing, a key pivot rod disposed transversely within the housing, keys having rearwardly facing key slots at their rear ends springably engaged with said pivot rod and downwardly projecting arms at their front ends provided with longitudinal slots and transverse key hole slots opening at the lower ends thereof, hammers having angularly disposed arms at their front ends disposed in said longitudinal slots of said keys and provided with pivots springably engaging the key slots thereof, the angled portions of said angularly disposed arms constituting sliding fulcrums for said hammers, and a combined fulcrum and buffer strip secured to the bottom below the front ends of the keys and hammer arms to receive the impact thereof and to swingably support the hammers adjacent their fulcrums.

2. A musical instrument comprising a housing including a bottom, sound elements disposed within the housing, a key pivot rod disposed transversely within the housing, keys having rearwardly facing key slots at their rear ends springably engaged with said pivot rod and downwardly projecting arms at their front ends provided with longitudinal slots and transverse key hole slots opening at the lower ends thereof, hammers having angularly disposed arms at their front ends disposed in said longitudinal slots of said keys and provided with pivots springably engaging the key slots thereof, the angled portions of said angularly disposed arms constituting sliding fulcrums for said hammers, and a hammer buffer strip secured to the bottom under the fulcrums of the hammers.

3. A musical instrument comprising a housing including a bottom, sound elements disposed within the housing, a key pivot rod disposed transversely within the housing, keys having rearwardly facing key slots at their rear ends springably engaged with said pivot rod and downwardly projecting arms at their front ends provided with longitudinal slots and transverse key hole slots opening at the lower ends thereof, and hammers having angularly disposed arms at their front ends disposed in said longitudinal slots of said keys and provided with pivots springably engaging the key slots thereof, the angled portions of said angularly disposed arms constituting sliding fulcrums for said hammers.

4. In a musical instrument, the combination of a support, sound elements mounted thereon, a key pivot rod, keys having key hole slots at their rear ends springably receiving said pivot rod and having downwardly projecting arms at their front ends provided with key hole slots, hammers having angularly disposed arms at their front ends provided with pivots springably engaging the slots in the front ends of said keys, said hammer arms constituting sliding fulcrums for said hammers, and a combined hammer fulcrum and key buffer strip disposed below the front ends of the keys to receive the impact thereof and to swingably support the hammers adjacent their pivots.

5. In a musical instrument, the combination of a support, sound elements mounted thereon, a key pivot rod, keys having key hole slots at their rear ends springably receiving said pivot rod and having downwardly projecting arms at their front ends provided with key hole slots, and hammers having angularly disposed arms at their front ends provided with pivots springably engaging the slots in the front ends of said keys, said hammer arms constituting sliding fulcrums for said hammers.

6. In a musical instrument, the combination of a support, sound elements mounted thereon, a key pivot rod, keys having key hole slots at their rear ends springably receiving said pivot rod and having downwardly projecting arms at their front ends provided with key hole slots, and hammers having pivots at their front ends springably engaging the slots in the front ends of said keys.

7. In a musical instrument, the combination of a support, sound elements mounted thereon, pivotally mounted keys having downwardly projecting arms at their front ends, hammers having angularly disposed arms at their front ends pivotally connected to the front ends of said keys, said hammer arms constituting sliding fulcrums for said hammers, and a non-metallic fulcrum for said hammers.

8. In a musical instrument, the combination of a support, sound elements carried thereby, keys pivotally mounted on said support and having downwardly opening key hole slots at their front ends, hammers having pivots springably engaged in said slots, a fulcrum element for said hammers disposed rearwardly of their points of connection to the keys, said hammers being free to slide on and swing upwardly from said fulcrum for free striking movement with the sound elements, and a return buffer for said hammers.

9. In a musical instrument, the combination of a support, sound elements carried thereby, keys pivotally mounted on said support, hammers pivotally engaged with the said keys, and a fulcrum element for said hammers disposed rearwardly of their points of connection to the keys, said hammers being free to slide on and swing upwardly from said fulcrum for free striking movement with the sound elements.

10. In a musical instrument, the combination of a support, sound elements mounted thereon, a key pivot rod, keys having key hole slots in their rear ends springably receiving said pivot rod and key hole slots in their front ends, and hammers having pivots springably engaged in said slots in the front ends of said keys, said hammers being freely swingable on their said pivotal connections to said keys and being provided with a sliding fulcrum at the rear of said pivotal connections to the keys whereby they are free to swing on their pivots into striking engagement with the sound elements when actuated by said keys.

11. In a musical instrument, the combination of a support, sound elements mounted thereon, a 1 key pivot rod, keys having snap on engagement with said pivot rod, and hammers having pivots having snap on engagement with said keys, said hammers being freely swingable on their said pivotal connections to said keys and being provided with a sliding fulcrum at the rear of the pivotal connections to the keys whereby they are free to swing on their pivots into striking engagement with the sound elements when actuated by said keys.

12. A toy piano comprising a housing having top and bottom walls, said bottom wall extending beyond the top wall toward the front thereof, a face plate depending from said top wall and terminating short of said bottom wall, a front board projecting upwardly from said bottom wall forwardly from said face plate to approximately the level of the bottom of said face plate, a key pivot rod extending along the lower edge of said face plate and spaced slightly therebelow, key elements having slots in their rear edges springably engaging said rod, down turned ends on the front of said key elements defining other slots, and hammer elements having pivots on the front thereof springably engaged in said other slots, said hammer elements having a fulcrum portion engageable with said bottom wall at points below and to the rear of said pivots in the raised position of said key elements.

13. A toy piano comprising a housing having top and bottom walls, said bottom wall extending beyond the top wall toward the front thereof, a face plate depending from said top wall and terminating short of said bottom wall, a front board projecting upwardly from said bottom wall forwardly from said face plate, a key pivot rod extending along the lower edge of said face plate, key elements having slots in their rear edges springably engaging said rod, down turned ends on the front of said keys defining other slots, and hammer elements having pivots on the front 0 thereof springably engaged in said other slots, said hammers having fulcrum portions engageable with said bottom wall at points below and to the rear of said pivots in the raised position of said key elements.

14. A toy piano comprising a housing having top and bottom walls, said bottom wall extending beyond the top wall toward the front thereof, a face plate depending from said top wall and terminating short of said bottom wall, a front board projecting upwardly from said bottom wall forwardly from said face plate, a key pivot rod extending along the lower edge of said face plate, key elements having slots in their rear edge springably engaging said rod, the fronts of said keys defining other slots, and hammer elements having pivots on the front thereof springably engaged in said other slots, said hammers having fulcrum portions engageable with said bottom wall at points below and to the rear of said pivots 0s in the raised position of said key elements.

JOHN A. BREWER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 1,444,722 2,159,491 2,260,310 2,279,144 Name Date Bartholomae -----_ Feb. 6, 1923 Rose ------------- May 23, 1939 Gould -- ------ Oct. 28, 1941 Lohr ---------- Apr. 7, 1942