Title:
Cap
United States Patent 2462258


Abstract:
This invention relates to headwear and more particularly to caps. It is an object of my invention to provide a cap which will protect part of the face of the wearer. Another object is to provide a cap with means adapted to protect the face and capable of being positioned within the cap without...



Inventors:
Dannenberg, Milton A.
Application Number:
US65590846A
Publication Date:
02/22/1949
Filing Date:
03/21/1946
Assignee:
Dannenberg, Milton A.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/10
International Classes:
A42B1/06
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
1331701Cap1920-02-24
1289766N/A1918-12-31
1097530N/A1914-05-19
1050310N/A1913-01-14
0873856N/A1907-12-17
0768276N/A1904-08-23
0542636N/A1895-07-16



Description:

This invention relates to headwear and more particularly to caps.

It is an object of my invention to provide a cap which will protect part of the face of the wearer.

Another object is to provide a cap with means adapted to protect the face and capable of being positioned within the cap without substantially interfering with the fit of the cap.

An additional object is to provide a cap with means adapted to protect a part of the head below the crown and capable of being positioned within the cap without substantially interfering with the fit of the cap.

A further object is to provide a cap which will afford a transparent eye shield.

It is another object to provide a cap with means adapted to protect front, rear and side portions of the head below the crown.

It is a further object to provide a cap with means adapted to protect front, rear and side portions of the head below the crown and capable of being positioned within the cap without substantially interfering with the fit of the cap.

It is also an object to provide a cap with a cap portion adapted to fit snugly and protect the back of the neck and overlap the top of the back of the jacket or other outer garment of the wearer.

It is also an object to provide a cap with a cape portion adapted to fit snugly and protect the back of the neck and overlap the top of the back of the jacket or other outer garment of the wearer, and to provide for the protection of the ears.

It is an additional object to provide a cap with means for protecting front and other portions of the head below the crown, the structure being such that one of the protecting means operates to hold all of the protecting means close to the head.

Another object is to provide a cap having separate means for protecting different parts of the head below the crown, the cap being so constructed that such means may be folded within the cap without interfering substantially with the fit of the cap, one of the protecting means being capable of being folded up snugly against the outside of the crown.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will appear as the description proceeds.

The invention will be better understood upon reference to the following description and accompanying drawings, in which: Fig. 1 Is a perspective view of one form of cap embodying my invention, with all head protecting means in operative position.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a cap made in accordance with my invention, with the eye shield in operative position and the cape folded over the crown.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the cap with all of the protecting means disposed within the crown of the cap.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the cap with the eye shield inside the crown and the cape folded over the crown.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the cap with all of the protecting means depending from the crown, in position ready to be placed on the head of the wearer.

Fig. 6 is a bottom plan view of the cap showing all protecting means folded within the crown in a position to receive the head of the wearer without interfering with the fit of the cap.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view taken as indicated by the line 7-1 in Fig. 6, the thickness of certain parts being exaggerated for the sake of clarity, and with the parts disposed in the positions they occupy when the cap is worn as shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 8 is a sectional view of the snap fastening means.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, there is shown generally at 10 a cap having a crown 12 and a visor 14 which may be of any conventional or other suitable construction. The crown may comprise a cover 16 of cotton, poplin, leather, water-proof coated, plastic, wool or other suitable material, and may be made without a lining or may have a lining 18 of flannel or other suitable material. Taping 19 in the interior of the lining may be stitched to the lining 18 and crown cover 16 and serves to join the sections 20 of the crown cover, when sections are employed, although it will be appreciated that the crown cover may be made in one piece if desired.

The visor 14 may comprise a cover 22 of the same material as the crown cover 16 or of any other suitable material, having within the same a stiffener 24 of buckram, cardboard or other suitable material. In accordance with my invention, I provide an eye shield, shown generally at 30, stitched as at 31 to the visor 14 and crown 12, with the ends 32 of the eye shield preferably extending beyond the ends 34 of the visor 14. The shield 30 may be made of a piece of transparent material, or may comprise a frame 38 of sheet material which is preferably readily pliable and may be made of any of the materials referred to above from which the crown cover may be constructed, or any other suitable material, with an opening 40 at which is stitched or otherwise secured a bezel 42 and a transparent colorless or colored pane or window 44 placed so as to afford adequate range of vision, the window being made of any suitable material, preferably acetate or other plastic, and flexible. The shield 30 may extend downward to any desired extent, when the shield is in eye-protecting position, for example substantially to the lower part of the nose, as shown.

For the protection of the ears, back of the head and neck I provide a cape generally indicated at 50 and stitched as at 51 or otherwise secured to the crown preferably substantially throughout the length of but preferably somewhat within the bottom edge 52 of the crown as far as the ends 34 of the visor 14, thus preferably substantially overlapping the end portions 32 of the eye shield 30. The cape 50 is preferably in two sections 54 and 56. The section 54 is preferably substantially U-shaped, the bight portion 58 thereof being adapted to extend substantially to the bottom of the normally exposed portion of the back of the head and back of the neck, and forward at both sides to cover the ears, as shown at 60. The arms or straps 62 and 64 of the U are formed with mating snaps 66 and 70, so arranged that when they are snapped together and disposed under the chin, no metal or other material of which the snaps are made is exposed to the chin, as shown at 72. The U-shaped portion 54 is preferably of two ply construction as shown at 74 and 75. The flap 56 is peferably in the form of a flap stitched as at 76 or otherwise connected to the margin of the bight portion 58 of the U-shaped section 54 opposite the margin of the bight secured to the crown, the remainder of the flap being free, and the ends 80 of the flap overlapping somewhat the straps 62 and 64. The flap 56 is of such height as to extend below the top 82 of the collar 84 or other upper margin of the jacket 86 or other outer garment worn by the wearer of the cap, and may overlie the collar, as shown, or underlie it. The flap 56 thereby prevents the elements or wind from gaining access to the back of the head or neck and, by reason of its overlapping the straps 62 and 64, affords protection against the elements and wind at the places where the straps part from the bight 53 to extend under the chin.

The height of the flap 56 is somewhat less than that of the bight 58, and the flap is adapted to be folded at its stitch line 76 up against the outer 5 face 74 of the bight 58 as shown in Figs. 2 and 4 to 7. The flap 56 is thus folded against the bight 58 when the entire cape is to be disposed in inoperative position, either outside of the crown as shown in Figs. 2 and 4, in which event the 6 cape is folded up about the bottom 52 of the crown, or within the crown as shown in Figs. 3, 6, and 7.

When clasped together under the chin, the straps 62 and 64, by reason of their overlapping 6i the end portions 32 of the eye shield 30, hold the eye shield in proper proximity to the face.

Fig. 1 shows the cap with all of its protective means in use. If it is desired to use only the eye shield 30, the arrangement is as shown in 7 Fig. 2. This arrangement may be achieved by folding the flap 56 from the position shown in Fig. 1 or Fig. 5 to the dash-dot line position shown in Fig. 5, thence folding the entire cape 50 upward and outward about the bottom 52 of the 7 crown 12, so that the flap will then be positioned between the cape section 54 and the exterior of the crown cover 16 as shown in Figs. 2 and 4, and then snapping together the snap fasteners 66, 70 to secure the straps 62 and 64 together at the tap of the crown. Here, again, no metal of the snaps will be exposed, as shown at 72, thereby contributing to the appearance of the cap and shielding the metal from the adverse effects of rain, etc.

If it is desired to wear the cap like a conventional one, as shown in Fig. 3, the eye shield 30 is first folded about its stitch line 31 to occupy substantially the position shown in Figs. 6 and 7, in close proximity to the lining 18 of the crown, where it does not substantially interfere with the fit of the cap on the wearer's head. Then the flap 56 is folded to the dash-dot line position shown in Fig. 5, whereupon the entire cape 50 is folded about its stitching 51 with the crown 12 into the interior of the crown and the straps 62 and 64 are overlapped therein so that the cape in its entirety lies substantially flatwise adjacent the interior surface of the crown.

It is realized that the actual size of the cap when the eye shield alone or both the shield and the cape are disposed within the crown as just described will be smaller than when the shield and cape are not inside the crown, but inasmuch as caps of this character do not require the precision of fit required of dress caps or hats, the fit, if satisfactory with the shield and cape disposed within the crown, will be satisfactory when they are not within the crown. As is noted above, the showing of the thickness of material is exaggerated in order that details may be more clearly presented.

A preferably substantially endless piece of stiffening material, such as buckram 98, and a sweat band 100 of mixed cotton and rayon or other suitable material are disposed on opposite sides of the inturned margins of the crown (and the margins of the eye shield, visor, cap and taping where located), and are secured in place and 15 together as by the stitching 51.

The straps 62 and 64, when within the crown, may be arranged with the end of either between the other end and the crown, but preferably they are disposed with the backs 106 of the plug ele0O ments 66 of the snap fasteners exposed. These backs are flat and substantially even with the material adjacent them so that a substantially smooth surface is presented to the top of the head. The overlap of the cape 50 with respect 5 to the end portions 32 of the eye shield 30 has an additional advantage, namely, that when the various protecting parts are disposed within the crown, the positioning of the eye shield substantially against the interior surface of the crown 0 is facilitated.

It will be evident from the foregoing that I have provided a cap of unusually simple construction, adapted to be worn with various pro5 tecting portions in operative positions offering desired protection against the elements while presenting in each case a neat and attractive appearance., Various modifications coming within the spirit , of my invention may suggest themselves to those skilled in the art, and hence I do not wish to be limited to the specific form shown or uses mentioned, except to the extent indicated in the appended claims, which are to be interpreted as 5 broadly as the state of the art will permit.

I claim: 1. A cap comprising a crown, a visor, an eye shield, means connecting said visor and shield to the base of said crown, said shield extending at both ends beyond the ends of said visor, a U-shaped piece comprising a bight portion connected to said base beyond said visor and terminating at the ends of said visor and exteriorly overlapping and extending end portions of said shield, said bight being dimensioned to protect the ears and back of the neck of the wearer, the arms of said U-shaped piece constituting straps having means for fastening the same under the chin of the wearer, said piece being of limp material and being foldable selectively within or over said crown into flatwise engagement therewith, said fastening means being interconnectable at the top of the crown with said straps in snug engagement with the crown, and a coat collar covering flap of generally trapezoidal form with its short base connected to the lower margin of said bight and the remainder of said flap free and its ends exteriorly overlapping said straps.

2. A cap comprising a crown, a visor and an eyeshield connected to the base of said crown, a U-shaped piece comprising a bight portion connected to said base and dimensioned to cover the ears and back of the neck of the wearer, the arms of said U-shaped piece constituting straps exteriorly overlapping the end portions of said shield and having means for fastening the same under the chin, and a coat collar covering flap of generally quadrilateral form with a base thereof connected to the lower margin of said bight and the remainder of said flap free and its ends exteriorly overlapping said straps.

3. A cap comprising a crown and a cape connected to said crown and having a portion for protecting the ears and the back of the neck, straps extending from the portions for protecting the ears, means for fastening said straps together under the chin, and a flap for protecting the wearer's coat collar, said flap being of generally quadrilateral form with a base thereof stitched to and adapted to depend from the lower part of the neck-protecting portion, the ends of said flap exteriorly overlapping said straps.

MILTON A. DANNENBERG.

REFERENCES CITED 20 The following references are of record in the file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 542,636 768,276 873,856 1,050,310 1,097,530 1,289,766 1,331,701 Name Date Goldstein -------- July 16, 1895 Fox -------------- Aug. 23, 1904 Gordon ----------- Dec. 17, 1907 Steinberg et al. --- Jan. 14, 1913 Cabelinsky --------- May 19, 1914 Hook ------------- Dec. 31, 1918 Fendelman --------- Feb. 24, 1920