Title:
Adjustable mast leg support
United States Patent 2429009


Abstract:
This invention relates to oil well masts having a pair of pivoted legs, and more particularly to means for attaching the lower ends of the pivoted legs to the base that supports the mast. Many portable oil well masts have a pair of legs, usually the rear pair, divided into rigidly connected...



Inventors:
Woolslayer, Homer J.
Campbell, Erwin A.
Cecil, Jenkins
Application Number:
US57943645A
Publication Date:
10/14/1947
Filing Date:
02/23/1945
Assignee:
MOORE CORP LEE C
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/116
International Classes:
E21B15/00
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2293958Narrow bottom tiltable mast1942-08-25
2106084Joist suspension1938-01-18



Description:

This invention relates to oil well masts having a pair of pivoted legs, and more particularly to means for attaching the lower ends of the pivoted legs to the base that supports the mast.

Many portable oil well masts have a pair of legs, usually the rear pair, divided into rigidly connected or stationary upper legs, and adjustable lower legs pivotally connected at their upper ends to the lower ends of the stationary legs.

The pivoted legs often form one set of legs of a 1 gin pole that aids in raising the mast, and generally are inclined away from the foot of the mast in the direction of the draw-works. In order for these legs to give clearance for drawworks of various sizes, it is desirable to be able 1 to attach their lower ends to the base at points farther from the foot of the mast in some cases than in others. Heretofore, swinging the pivoted legs to a different position for such a purpose 'has required shoe plates of different heights by which the legs are connected to the base, because the lower end of each leg is adjustable in an arc having its pivoted upper end as its center, and therefore the height of the lower end of the ,leg above the top of the base varies with the distance of the leg from the foot of the mast.

It is among the objects of this invention to provide a support for the lower end of a pivoted leg of a mast which permits the position of the leg to be varied, which does not require replacement by another support when the position of the leg is changed, which is readily adjustable for the d'fferent positions of the leg, and which is relatively simple in construction and easily installed.

These and other objects are attained by locating a base member below each pivoted leg and by connecting the leg thereto by means of a certain kind of shoe. This base member preferably is permanently mounted in the usual base on which the mast stands. The upper end of the shoe, which is connected to the pivoted leg, is adaptec to be selectively disposed in any one of a plu, rality of different positions occupied by the lower end of the leg when moved closer to or farther from the foot of the mast, and this is accomplished by making the shoe attachable to the base member in different positions. Thus, the shoe may be adjustably attached to the side of the base member by means of removable fastening members extending through openings in the base member and shoe. By providing a plurality of these openings in certain predetermined positions in the base member, the shoe can be attached to it different distances from the foot of the mast and at different elevations. In each different position the shoe may be braced by brackets likewise adjustably connected to it and to the base member. The openings through the Sbase member are so positioned that the farther the shoe is located from the foot of the mast the higher it projects above the base member. Each different position of the upper end of the shoe is in an arc having its center at the pivoted upper 0 end of the leg.

The preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Figs. 1, 2 and 3 are fragmentary diagrammatic side views of a mast having pivoted rear . legs connected to its supporting base at different distances from the foot of the mast; Fig. 4 is an enlarged side view of the support for a pivoted leg with the shoe occupying the position shown in Fig. 1; Figs. 5 and 6 are views similar to Fig. 4 with the shoe changed to the positions shown in Figs. 2 and 3, respectively; Fig. 7 is an end view of the shoe taken on the line ViI-VII of Fig. 6; and Fig. 8 is a plan view of the leg support.

Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawings, the foot of a mast I is connected through hinges 2 to a horizontal base 3 resting on the ground. The base preferably is fabricated in the usual way from longitudinally and transversely extending I-beams and the like. The mast is supported in upright position by means of a gin pole formed from two pairs of legs; one pair pivotally connected to the other at their upper ends at 4.

The gin pole is used to support the cable by which the mast is swung up into upright position around hinges 2 in a well-known manner. The lower ends of the front legs 5 of the gin pole are secured to the base, and its rear legs 6 form continuations of the rigidly connected rear legs 1 of the upright mast to which legs 6 are, in effect, pivotally connected by reason of their pivoted connection to the front legs of the gin pole to which the upright mast is connected. Therefore, pivoted legs 6 actually form the lower portions of the mast's rear legs. The lower ends of these pivoted legs are adjustably attached to the base 3 by means forming the subject matter of this invention.

Thus, a pair of base members, preferably in the form of a pair of laterally spaced channels 10 standing on edge, are connected at their ends, such as by welding, to a pair of the transverse I-beams 11 that form part of the fabricated base 3 for the mast. Although one channel could be used, a more rigid structure is obtained by using two as shown in Figs. 7 and 8; a pair for each pivoted leg of the mast. In the vertical slot formed between this pair of channels a shoe 12 is adjustably mounted. This shoe is formed from a pair of spaced parallel vertical plates 13 which, most suitably, are triangular in shape and rigidly connected together by a pair of bars 14 welded to their inner surfaces. One corner of the shoe projects above the base and is provided with aligned openings 16 in its two plates.

As shown in Figs. 4 and 7, the lower end of a pivoted leg 6 of the mast projects between these two plates and is provided with a transverse opening that registers with the shoe openings. A suitable fastening member 17 extends through all three openings for connecting the leg to the shoe.

The lower corners of the shoe likewise are provided with transverse openings that can register with a pair of similar openings 18 in channels 10, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5. Removable fastening members 19 extend through these registering openings to detachably connect the shoe to the base members. By having several openings 18 through each channel and equally spacing them 2 apart, the shoe can be mounted in any one of several different positions. Openings 18 are disposed in an arc having the pivoted upper end of leg 6 as its center. This means that the different positions into which the upper end of the shoe is 3 adjustable will define an arc likewise having the pivoted upper end of the leg as its center. In other words, the two arcs are concentric. Therefore, as the leg is swung outwardly and its lower end rises, the shoe which supports it will project 3, above the base a correspending amount and support the leg without requiring the mast to be tilted in order to permit the leg and shoe to be connected.

Usually three different positions for the pivoted 4( leg give a sufficient range of adjustment. Three such positions can be obtained with only three base member openings 18 by making the base and one side of the triangular shoe of different length than its remaining side. Such a shoe can be reversed to locate its upper end in either of two different positions, and yet it can be connected to the same pair of base member openings 18 in both instances. The third position of the shoe is obtained when it is connected to the other pair 5 of base member openings. It also is preferred to make the base of the shoe shorter than either of its sides so that the base member will not have to be made unduly high in order to accommodate openings 18.

In Figs. 1 and 4 the shoe is shown with its upper end disposed in its lowest position in which it is closest to the foot of the mast. In Figs. 2 and 5 fastening members 19, by which the shoe is connected to channels 10, are in the same pair of openings 18 as in Fig. 4, but the shoe has been turned around so that it now projects farther above the base with its upper end also located farther from the foot of the mast. The third 65 position of the shoe, shown in Figs. 3 and 6, is produced by removing the fastening members 19 and shifting the shoe's position between channels 10 to cause its lower openings to register with the upper pair of openings 18. The fastening members are then placed in these registering openings. As shown in Fig. 4, a curved line connecting the three different positions occupied by the centers of openings 16 describes an arc having its center at the pivot point 4 at the upper end of leg 6. A similar line through the center of openings 18 would be found to be parallel to the curved line just referred to.

The shoe may be slightly narrower than the space between the base member channels to facilitate its adjustment between them, but it can be braced by means of a pair of brackets 21 attached to the top of the channels and to the opposite sides of the shoe. For this purpose the upper flanges of the channels are each provided with a series of three longitudinally spaced sets of holes 22 to permit the brackets to be connected thereto in different positions by bolts 23. The shoe is provided with three holes 24 through it, one for each different position of the shoe. That is, for each different position of the shoe there is a hole through it that registers with holes through the top of the brackets so that a bolt 25 can extend through the shoe and the two 0 brackets.

By means of a support such as disclosed herein, the position of a pivoted leg of a mast can easily be varied by merely changing the position of the shoe 12 relative to its supporting base members 5 and shifting the position of the brackets 21 accordingly. These things involve merely the removal of a few fastening members and the reinsertion of them in openings in a different position. Although three openings 18 have been 0 shown in each channel 10, it will be obvious that a larger number may be provided in cases where there is room for them.

This application is a continuation-in-part of our joint application Serial No. 523,684, filed 5February 24, 1944, for Adjustable mast leg support.

According to the provisions of the patent statutes, we have explained the principle and conSstruction of our invention and have illustrated and described what we now consider to represent its best embodiment. However, we desire to have it understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced Sotherwise than as specifically illustrated and described.

We claim: 1. A support for varying the position of the lower end of a pivoted leg of a mast, comprising a base member adapted to be located below such a leg, a reversible triangular shoe having one corner pointing upwardly above the base member and provided with a horizontal opening therethrough for connecting it to the lower end of the leg, the base and one side of the shoe being of different length than its remaining side, said base member being provided with at least three uniformly spaced horizontal openings disposed in an arc having the pivoted upper end of the leg as its center, the lower corners of the shoe being provided with horizontal openings adapted to register with different pairs of said base member openings to locate the upper shoe opening in different positions along an arc concentric with said first-mentioned arc, and removable fastening members extending through the lower shoe openings and the base member openings registering therewith to detachably connect the shoe to the base member.

2. A support for varying the position of the lower end of a pivoted leg of a mast, comprising a base member adapted to be located below such a leg, a reversible triangular shoe having one corner pointing upwardly above the base member and provided with a horizontal opening therethrough for connecting it to the lower end of the leg, the sides of the shoe being of unequal length and longer than its base, said base member being provided with three uniformly spaced horizontal openings disposed in an arc having the pivoted upper end of the leg as its center, the lower corners of the shoe being provided with horizontal openings adapted to register with different pairs of said base member openings to locate the upper shoe opening in different positions along an arc concentric with said first-mentioned arc, removable fastening members extending through the lower shoe openings and the base member openings registering therewith to detachably connect the shoe to the base member, and a bracket detachably connected to the top of said base member and to the shoe for bracing the shoe.

HOMER J. WOOLSLAYER.

ERWIN A. CAMPBELL.

CECIL JENKINS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Woolslayer et al. __- Aug. 25, 1942 Coddington -------- Jan. 18, 1938