Title:
Electric target game
United States Patent 2404653
Abstract:
This invention relates to an electric target game in which a target is moved thru space for being fired upon by a beam of light, and concerns itself primarily with a target which is electrically or otherwise controlled so that at a predetermined time or after a predetermined distance of travel...


Inventors:
Plebanek, Leonard Z.
Application Number:
US53461944A
Publication Date:
07/23/1946
Filing Date:
05/08/1944
Assignee:
Charles, Strebel J.
Anthony, Bird
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
434/16, 463/52
International Classes:
A63F9/02; F41G3/26
View Patent Images:
Description:

This invention relates to an electric target game in which a target is moved thru space for being fired upon by a beam of light, and concerns itself primarily with a target which is electrically or otherwise controlled so that at a predetermined time or after a predetermined distance of travel or movement such target will cause an attack upon the gunner if he has not been hit himself at such time or distance.

The preferred target consists of a rabbit which is caused to travel a predetermined distance during which the gunner will have an-opportunity to hit the rabbit with a beam of light, an action which will illuminate the face of the rabbit, if hit with such beam of light, and indicate to the gunner that a hit has been scored, the rabbit having a target spot for such purpose.

In the event that the rabbit is not hit before travelling a predetermined distance, he will turn and face the gunner and raise his own rifle that he is carrying which will be illuminated at its end indicating that a shot has been fired at the gunner. This shot will be scored and an electric shock will strike the gunner.

The invention comprises the novel structure and combination of parts hereinafter described and more particularly pointed out and defined in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings which illustrate the preferred form of this invention together with a modified form and in which similar reference numerals refer to similar features in the different views: Fig. 1 an elevational view in perspective of an apparatus involving this invention with parts omitted.

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken upon the line 2-2 of Fig. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows and with parts omitted.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view thru the target attached to the conveyor chain and showing parts in elevation.

Fig. 4 is a side elevational view of the target showing the same in traveling position.

Fig. 5 is a front elevational view of the target.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary top plan view of Fig. 3 with parts in elevation.

Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic view illustrating the wiring diagram of the above apparatus.

Fig. 8 is an elevational view of the gunner's rifle.

Fig. 9 is an elevational view in perspective of a modified form of a feature of the invention.

Fig. 10 is a perspective view of the gunner's rifle used in the modified form of apparatus.

Fig. 11 is a wiring diagram of the modified form of apparatus.

In referring now to the drawings, especially to Pigs. 1 to 8, there is shown a target housing 15 having a target chamber 15a at the top in which horizontal sprockets 16 (Fig. 2) are suitably mounted in spaced relation around which a conveyor chain 17 is trained.

Suitable parallel guides 18 extend parallel, to the chain for guiding and assisting in supporting the target 19 which in the present instance is shown as a rabbit. Spaced forwardly from the target housing, there is a coin box 20 having a coin slot 21. An electrical cable 22 connects the coin box with the target housing for supplying the necessary current that is required therein.

A second electrical cable 23 extends from the coin box to the gunner's or player's rifle 24 for furnishing the current for the beam of light as is well known in the art. The cable 23 also includes suitable shock wires 25 and 26 which are respectively connected to hand pieces 27 and 28 on the gunner's rifle 24, which pieces are suitably insulated from the body of the rifle. These hand pieces 27 and 28 thus are adapted to be energized for imparting a mild electric shock to the gunner under certain conditions as will later more fully appear.

The insertion of a coin in the coin box will also close a motor switch for operating a motor 29 for driving the conveyor chain. It might be mentioned that the motor switch may be a well known time switch so that the normal operation of the conveyor chain will be substantially one revolution for each operation. Thus. the target will always be brought to a normal starting position after each operation from a coin.

The rabbit target is shown as a hollow affair which is attached to a base bearing 30 (Fig. 3) by means of fasteners 31. This base portion has a'reduced cylindrical portion 32 rotatably mounted in a supporting plate 33 which is attached to the conveyor chain by a pivot pin 34 and suitable connecting pieces 35 in any suitable manner. The plate 33 carries a plurality of guide rollers 35 located respectively at the end margins for travelling upon rabbit tracks 37 formed in the top margins of the guide rails 18 which may be supported in any suitable manner.

The rabbit may have one or two hind legs 38 pivoted to the body portion as indicated at 39 (Fig. 4) which are adapted to strike a series of pins 40 extending from one or more of the guide rails 18 to make it appear as though the rabbit were running. The rabbit has two front arms or legs 41 pivoted to the shoulders thereof as indicated at 42. A miniature rifle 43 is pivoted to the ends of the arms as indicated at 44. The forward end of the rifle carries a small lamp 45 connected by wire 46 (Fig. 3) emerging from the wiring inside of the rabbit. The rear front arm of the rabbit carries a pendant rod 47 having a roller 48 at its lower end adapted to engage a cam 49 on the plate 33 when the rabbit is turning thru an angle of about ninety degrees for elevating the front arms and the rifle as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 4 at which time the light bulb in the end of the miniature rifle will be illuminated as will later more fully appear for making it appear that the rabbit has fired upon the gunner. At the same time, the gunner will be given a shock as will later be explained.

The rabbit carries a pin 50 (Fig. 6) which is adapted to strike a latch 5I controlled by a solenoid 52. If the hooked portion of the latch is in the path of the pin 50, the rabbit will be turned ninety degrees and face the gunner before the pin slips past the latch. When the pin has slipped past the latch, a coil spring 53 anchored to the plate 33 at 54 and having a strap 55 partially surrounding the rabbit and attached to a pin 50 will return the rabbit to his normal position.

When the rabbit is turning, the arms 41 and rifle 43 will be elevated as previously explained and the main electric switch 58 will be closed for energizing the circuit for illuminating the lamp in the miniature rifle carried by the rabbit and at the same time the relay 57 will be energized for closing switch 58 (Pig. 7) and transformer circuit 59.

When the transformer 59 is charged, a mild shock will be transmitted to the gunner thru wires 25 and 26 which are respectively connected with the transformer circuit and the switch 58.

The closing of switch 56 also energizes a magnet 60 which operates a counter 61 for recording the points scored by the rabbit. The switch 5'1 is adapted to be closed by a cam 56a on the rabbit when the rabbit is turning.

Within the rabbit, there is a photo-electric cell 62 which is adapted to be struck by a beam of light from the gunner's rifle when said gunner is expert enough to make an accurate shot. This beam of -light, if -accurately directed, will pass thru an aperture 63 in the rabbit. If the gunner makes a hit thru such aperture before the rabbit travels a predetermined distance, a circuit 64 (Fig. 7) from the photo-electric cell 62 to the solenoid 52 will be established whereby the latch will be attracted from the path of the pin 51 on the rabbit with the result that the rabbit will not be turned but will continue to travel approximately one revolution when the motor will stop. An amplifier 64a in the circuit of the photo-electric cell may be used to increase the potential delivered to the solenoid.

The idea of firing a beam of light at a photoelectric cell in a target thru a coin operated electric circuit is old and well known and for this reason, the wiring diagram for such has not been fully illustrated. The novelty of this invention is predicated more particularly upon the action of the target and the mild shock to the gunner and the wiring diagram for illustrating these actions is shown in Fig. 7 as will later be set forth.

In use, the gunner will insert a coin in the machine and close the motor switch for operating the motor 29 for rotating the conveyor chain and moving the target. He will then take the rifle and attempt to direct a beam of light thru the aperture 63 in the rabbit for striking the photo-electric cell for scoring points as is well known in the art. I-owever if the gunner fails to make a hit before the rabbit reaches the turning point at the latch 51, the said rabbit will turn ninety degrees as already explained, an operation which will close the switch 56 for energizing the lamp 45 on the miniature rifle indicating that the rabbit has fired at the gunner.

The closing of switch 56 will simultaneously close switch 56B which is connected thereto thru which the circuit to lamp 45 is completed. At the same time solenoid 57 will be energized for closing switch 58 for imparting a mild shock to the gunner thru wires 25 and 26. At the same time, the target counter I will be operated for recording the score made by the rabbit. It will be noted that the coil 68 for operating the solenoid is in circuit with the lamp 45. In due course, the spring 53 will return the rabbit to normal position.

In Figs 9 to 11, there is shown a modified form of a feature of the invention which includes a target housing 66 having a. target image receiving face 67 adjacent the top thereof upon which is adapted to be projected an image 68 by a projector 69. Supports 70 extend from the housing for supporting the projector 69 together with a gun 71 having spaced handles 7l a. The gun is mounted to be turned in azimuth for sighting on the target. The projector 69 is adapted to be oscillated by a small motor 69a as shown in Fig. 11 for moving the target image across the field. Such mechanism is old and well known and involves no part of this invention except as it may co-operate therewith.

The invention herein concerns itself more particularly with the feature of imparting a shock to the gunner and registering a score for the target, if the gunner fails to make an imaginary hit before the target reaches a predetermined point.

To this end, the handles 7 la of the gun have electric conductors 72 associated therewith, each of which is suitably grounded as shown in Fig. 11 and which are connected in parallel relation with an electric conductor 73 which extends to a stationary switch blade 74. This switch blade 74 is normally in open position while the projector 69 oscillates from the right hand limit to the center or during the time of the travel thru the "off" position. During this movement, the gunner or player must make an imaginary hit upon the target or else he will receive a mild shock. For when the image moves from the center to the left or thru the "on" position, the switch blade 74 will be in circuit with the handles of the rifle.

This is brought about by a cam bracket 75 insulated from the projector by insulation 75A and attached to the projector. This cam bracket is designed to operate against a roller 76 which is part of the main switch. The roller 78 is connected to a stud 77 to the ends of which are secured switch members 78 and 79, the former of which is adapted to engage the blade 74 while the latter is connected with a source of current 80.

The switch member 79 is adapted to engage a stationary switch blade 81 which is connected to a conductor 82 which in turn extends to a switch member 83 which is adapted to be engaged by a movable switch member or blade 84 connected by an insulated pin 85 with a second movable switch member 86 which is adapted to be moved to open position by a solenoid coil 87 or the like. The coil 87 is connected to a source of energy. The switch blade 86 is preferably connected to a transformer 88 for having its potential increased.

The switch blade 86 normally engages a contact on a conductor 89 which leads to the switch member 78 that furnishes the shock current.

The movable switch blade 84 is connected to a conductor 90 leading to solenoid 91 or the like which operates a target counter 92 and which is connected with the source of energy by a conductor 93. The resistance coil 87 is connected by wires 94 and 95 (shown broken) with a switch member 96 and a battery 97 respectively.

The gun 71 is shown in the wiring as movably pivoted at 98 and as carrying a contact 99 adapted for engaging a contact 100 carried by the projector 69. A conductor 101 connects the contact 100 with a relay 102 which may be termed the "hit relay." The contact 99 is connected by a conductor 103 with a stationary switch blade 104 on the handle of the gun. The switch blade 104 is adapted to be contacted by a movable switch blade 105 which is connected to a conductor 106 leading to a source of energy. A trigger 107 pivoted on the gun handle is adapted to be operated by the gunner or player for closing the switch 104-105.

The hit relay 102 is also connected to the source of energy. This relay when energized is adapted for attracting a switch member 96 into contact with wire 94 for closing the circuit thru the resistance coil 87.

The motor 69a may be connected by a crank 109 to the projector 69. This motor is shown connected by the electrical conductors I10 and III to a suitable source of energy 112. The conductor III may be provided with a suitable switch I13 which may be coin operated or otherwise. It is merely illustrative of a means for starting the motor.

In practice with reference to the modified form, the gunner will cause the motor switch 113 to be closed for starting the motor for oscillating the projector 69. During the movement of the projector 69, a target image 68 will be projected upon the receiving surface 67. While this image travels thru the "off" position, the gunner will sight the gun upon the moving target and pull the trigger 107 for closing the switch 104-105. Now if the gunner has made an accurate sight when he pulls the trigger 107, the contact 99 on the gun will contact the contact 100 on the projector 69 for closing the circuit which causes operation of the relay 102. The operation of the relay 102 will close the circuit to the relay 87 which will open switches 84 and 86 for opening the shock circuit and preventing the gunner from receiving a shock. Mechanism for recording the score of the gunner has not been shown as it is old and well known and involves no part of this invention except as it may co-operate therewith.

In the event that the gunner fails to make such an imaginary hit which will close the circuit thru contacts 99 and 100 while the image is travelling thru the "off" position, the switches 78-74 and 79-81 will be closed thru the movement of the cam bracket 15 while the image is moving thru the "on" position. The closing ol the switch 78-74 will establish the shock circuit thru the handles of the gun for shocking the gunner. The closing of the switch 79-81 will close the circuit to the magnet 91 for operating the target counter 92 for registering the score thus made by the target.

Thus in both forms, the apparatus act to give the gunner or player a mild shock if the gunner fails to make an imaginary hit before the target reaches a predetermined point and when this occurs a score is recorded on a counter in behalf of the target.

It is characteristic of this invention that the gunner or player must make an imaginary shot before the target reaches a certain point and hit the target or else he will receive a mild shock and the target will score.

In the form of the invention involving the mechanical rabbit, an effective imaginary shot will cause the rabbit's face to be illuminated or as it were, cause the rabbit to blush. But should the imaginary shot not be effective, the rabbit will do the extraordinary and turn and simulate a shot at the gunner or player.

The game hence affords exceedingly interesting entertainment and amusement wherein the target can attack the gunner or player and score points as well as the player.

I am aware that many changes may be made and various details of construction may be varied without departing from the principles of this invention so I do not propose limiting the patent granted thereon otherwise than necessitated by the prior art.

I claim as my invention: 1. In a game of the class described, a target, means to move said target, a weapon carried by said target, means for causing said target to turn after a predetermined movement under certain conditions and electrical means for causing illumination of the end of said weapon for simulating a shot at substantially the end of the turning movement of said target.

2. In a game of the class described, a target, means for moving said target, a weapon carried by said target, means for causing said target to turn after a predetermined movement and elevate said weapon and electrical means for illuminating the end of said weapon for simulating a discharge therefrom at substantially the end of the turning movement of said target.

3. In a game of the class described, a target, means for moving said target, a weapon carried by said target, means for moving said target at an angle to the first movement under certain conditions and simultaneously elevating said weapon, electrical means for illuminating the end of said weapon at substantially the end of said second 65 movement, a target counter and means responsive to said electrical means for operating said counter for recording a target score.

4. In a game of the class described, a target, means for moving said target in space, a weapon carried by said target, a weapon adapted to be trained upon said target for directing a beam of light at a predetermined spot thereon, means for illuminating said target when penetrated by said beam of light, means for turning said target at a predetermined point if said beam of light has not penetrated the same, and means for simulating a discharge from the first weapon at subS stantially the end of such turning movement.

5. In a game of the class described, a target, S70 means including a gun for simulating a shot at the target, an electrical circuit including shock wires attached to the gun and means for controlling said circuit for passing current thru said S shock wires when said simulated shot is not accurately directed.

6. In a game of the class described, a target, means for moving said target, means including a gun for simulating a shot at the target, an electrical circuit including shock wires connected to said gun, means for controlling said circuit for passing current thru said shock wires when said simulated shot is not accurately directed, a target counter and means for operating said counter when said shock wires are energized.

7. In a game of the class described, a target 10I comprising a mechanical rabbit, means for moving said rabbit in a predetermined path, said rabbit having a pair of forward arms, a weapon pivotally supported by said arms, a second weapon adapted to be manner by a gunner for directing 15. a beam of light at the rabbit, a device adjacent the path of the rabbit adapted for co-operation with said rabbit for causing the rabbit to turn and face the gunner at a predetermined point, means responsive to the striking of said beam of light of a target spot on said rabbit before the same reaches said predetermined point for rendering said device inoperative and illuminating the face of the rabbit, and means for elevating the rabbit's weapon and simulating a shot at the gunner upon the turning movement of the rabbit, in the event that the gunner has-failed.

8. In a game of the class described, a target comprising a mechanical rabbit, means for causing said rabbit to travel in a predetermined path, means for causing said rabbit to turn at a predetermined point under predetermined conditions, said rabbit having pivotally supported arms, a firing weapon carried by said arms, and means for causing the elevation of said weapon and simulating a firing operation upon the turning movement of said rabbit.

9. In a game of the class described, a target comprising a mechanical rabbit having arms and a target spot, a weapon carried by said arms, means for causing said rabbit to travel in a predetermined path, a weapon adapted to be manned by a gunner for directing a beam of light at said target spot and means for causing illumination of the rabbit's face in the event said target spot has been pierced and means for causing a turning movement of said rabbit and an elevation of his weapon and simulating a shot at the gunner in the event that he has failed to strike said target spot.

LEONARD Z. PLEBANEK.