Title:
Fountain pen
United States Patent 2401711


Abstract:
My invention relates to fountain pens, and more particularly to those of the capless type, and one of my objects is to provide a pen of this type which is extensible, by a simple movement, from a concealed position to an operative one. A further object of the invention is to include a door...



Inventors:
Smith, Grover C.
Application Number:
US53864544A
Publication Date:
06/04/1946
Filing Date:
06/03/1944
Assignee:
Smith, Grover C.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
401/160
International Classes:
B43K5/17
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Description:

My invention relates to fountain pens, and more particularly to those of the capless type, and one of my objects is to provide a pen of this type which is extensible, by a simple movement, from a concealed position to an operative one.

A further object of the invention is to include a door or closure in the forward end of the pen designed to seal the same against the entrance of dust or other foreign matter when the pen is not in use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a unique mechanism for operating the aforesaid door, whereby to automatically open it when the pen is to be advanced into the operative position and close it when it is to be retracted to the concealed position.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a simple filling control in the rear end of the pen and operative only when the same is in the advanced position.

Another object of the invention is to provide a simple locking device effective to maintain the pen either in the advanced or the retracted position.

An important object of the invention is to construct the novel pen along lines of simplicity and economy, in order that the same may be produced at reasonable cost and maintained without appreciable need of attention or repair.

With the above objects in view and any others which may suggest themselves from the description to follow, a better understanding of the invention may be had by reference to the accompanying drawing, in whichFig. 1 is a top plan view of the improved pen; Fig. 2 is a view of its forward end as seen from the. left-hand end of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is an enlarged section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1, showing the pen in the retracted or normal position; Fig. 4 is similar view with the rear portion of the pen added, and showing the pen in the advanced or operative position; and Figs. 5 to 8 are, respectively, sections on the lines 5-5, 6-6, 7-7 and 8-8 of Fig. 4.

Referring specifically to the drawing, 15 denotes the barrel of the fountain pen, and the same may be plain or with any external or ornamental effects to suit styles or requirements. The barrel receives a cap-like control 16 at the rear, but no cap at its front end, such end being a wall 17 integral with the barrel and directed on a bias.

The stock of the pen is indicated at 18, and the same is reduced at 19 before terminating with the nib 20 and feed 21. At the rear, the stock 18 has a reduction 22 which terminates with a rubber sac 23. The assembly of the stock, nib, sac, etc. is -fundamentally standard, but the stock is made with special formations suitable for the present invention. One of these is a biased front edge 24, which enables the stock to make a sealed joint with the front end wall 17 of the barrel when the pen is in the advanced position of Fig. 4. Another is a flat bottom 25 for the extension 19. The barrel wall II Is made with a D-shaped opening 26 which the extension 19 fits slldably as it advances, the particular formation preventing the stock from turning in the barrel. Another formation is a reduction 27 from the bottom surface of the stock, this being to clear a mechanism which will presently be described.

The movement of the stock assembly from the rear to the advanced position is procured by the longitudinal travel of a control button 28 located over the top of the barrel 5.' The button 28 has a cylindrical shank 29 which is reduced from the sides to a relatively thin neck 30 next underneath the button 28; and a spring lever 31 extends forwardly from the bottom of the shank 29 to terminate with a downward bend 32 which is embedded or otherwise made fast to the forepart of the stock 18. Thus, while Fig. 3 shows the button 28 at the rear end of its travel, Fig. 4 shows that the button has been pushed to the forward end and procured the advance of the stock assembly.

The travel of the button 28 is made possible by the formation of a narrow longitudinal slot 33 in the top of the barrel 15, the slot only being wide enough for the sliding travel of the neck 30 of the shank 29. The ends of the slot 33 are expanded with circular openings 34, and the spring tension of the lever 31 is such as to boost the shank 29 into one or the other opening 34, so that the shank at normal height does not clear the slot 33 in case the button is moved to carry the shank 29 out of the particular opening 34.

However, when the button is depressed, the shank 29 will clear the path for the advance of the neck 30 into the slot. The feature just described is therefore a lock for the button at either end of its travel, so that the stock assembly of the pen cannot be moved forth or back unless the button is depressed. A shield 35 is carried between the shank 29 and lever 31 in a position next underneath the top of the barrel. The shield 35 is elongated and intended to cover the inside of the slot 33, being of sufficient length to do this wherever the button 28 may be positioned.

The shield is supported by the corner of the lever 31 with the button shank 29 and undergoes a slight and negligible movement when the button is depressed.

As was previously mentioned, the front end of the barrel 15 is designed to be closed when the pen is in the retracted position, and the closure is in the form of a door 36 pivoted near the front end of a base strip 37 located in the bottom of the barrel 15. In order that the door 36 may be kept in the normally closed position, a rocker arm 38 pivoted at 39 to the base strip is boosted by a leaf.spring 40 to bear against the inner face of the door 36 as shown in Fig. 3, whereby to keep the door firmly closed against the inner side of the barrel wall 17. However, when the stock assembly 18 is to be advanced, a lever 41 is actuated to operate the arm 38 in a manner to release and open the door 36. Thus, the lever 41 is also pivoted at 42 to the base strip 37. The rear end of the lever is made with a downbend 43 functioning as a cam in respect to the lower front end of the stock 18, so that when the latter is 'advanced it rides over the cam and causes the lever to rock in a clockwise direction. The front end of the lever 41 is located next underneath a tail portion 44 of the arm 38, so that the rocking of the lever as just mentioned serves to rock the arm 38 in a counter-clockwise direction. Thus, the effect of this action is to first release the proplike support of the arm 38 from the door 36; and the further rocking of the said arm engages its forward end with an inward spur 45 of the door to bear on the same and accomplish the full downswing of the door as indicated in Fig. 4. It is now apparent that the bottom cut-out 27 of the stock is provided to allow sufficient room for the mechanism just described; and it goes without saying that on the retraction of the stock the spring 40 acts to restore the parts of the mechanism to their original positions, closing the door 36.

Means are provided for filling the sac 23 by imparting pressure to the same from the side.

The element for this purpose is a long wire crank 46 which is situated alongside the sac as indicated in Figs. 3 and 6, the arms 47 of the crank being bowed to suit the curvature of the sac, as indicated in the latter figure. One end of the crank base 48 is journaled in a sleeve or other 6 receptacle 49 carried by the base strip 37, while the rear portion 50 of the said base passes through an opening 51 in a disc 52 mounted in the rear end of the barrel 15 to enter the rear cap 16.

Here the base is formed with an end crank 53 as a terminal, such end crank passing through a radial slot 54. made in a disc 55 carried by the cap 16. The latter is mounted on the rear end of the barrel with a lap-joint 56, and is rotatable in respect to the barrel. Thus, when the cap 16 6 is rotated in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 8 to swing the end crank 53 from the full-line to the dotted-line position, the same motion will be taken by the main crank 46 with the effect of compressing the.sac 23. The slot 54 is of a depth 6 to allow for clearance for the crank 53 to allow the turning axis of the cap 16 in respect to the pivot 48-50 of the crarxk 46.

Means are provided for retaining the end cap 16 to the barrel at all times, as it is not necessary 7 to remove such end cap for any purpose. The means referred to consist mainly of a spring wire spider 53 whose inner portions 58 are slidably retained between the disc 52 and a smaller disc 59 to the rear thereof by means of a rivet 60. The 7 spider has a number of equidistant terminal loops 61 which pass through openings 62 in the wall of the barrel 15 to enter an annular groove 63 in the wall of the cap 16. The loops thus form retainers against the retraction of the cap.

It is necessary to station the cap against turning accidentally, as for it to do so would impose pressure on the sac 23 and cause ink to leak from the nib 20. Thus, Fig. 1 shows that the cap 16 is formed with a tongue 64 to fit a notch 65 in the rear end of the barrel 15, this joint locking the cap against rotation. However, the cap may be drawn rearwardly to open the joint and enable the cap to be turned. Fig. 4 shows the cap so drawn, imposing tension on one of the spider loops 62. It follows that, after the cap has been turned to accomplish the filling operation of the pen and released, the pressure of the spider loop 62 will cause the cap to snap back into the locked position in respect to the joint 64-65 when the cap is again turned back.

It is noted in Figs. 5 and 6 that the base strip 37 is formed with curved sides 66 to seat the stock 18 and sac 23 more evenly; and the sides of the strip terminate with outward ledges 67 to prevent the edges of the strip from imposing cutting or other injurious influences on the sac.

To secure the base strip in the barrel, the front end of the strip is reduced at 37a from the sides 3o and lodged in a groove 17Ta at the bottom of the wall 17, while the rear end of the strip is reduced at 37b and fitted in a slot 52a in the bottom of the disc 52. It is further noted that the crank 46 extends sufficiently forward to be alongside the stock 18 when the latter is in the retracted position. Thus, the stock forms an abutment to lock the crank against inward movement, so that the rear cap 16 cannot be turned to compress the sac when the pen is in the retracted or confined position.

It will be evident from the above description that the improved pen has a number of advantageous features. First, it is a compact and closed article in a single piece requiring nothing to be added or taken off for its use. Further, the barrel contains an automatic closure to keep dust or other foreign matter out of it when the pen is in the enclosed or retracted position. Further, the pen stock accomplishes a firm seal, so that the accidental flooding of the nib or feed and consequent running of ink onto the stock will find no way for the ink to enter the barrel and clog the same. Further, the pen is advanced and retracted by a simple external control which bei5 comes automatically locked at either end of its travel. Further, a simple expedient is employed to compress the ink sac by a partial turn of the rear cap 16. Further, the control for the door 36 and the crank 46 constitute automatic fea0 tures to keep the pen closed and the sac 23 from being collapsed. Finally, as a capless pen, the novel embodiment is an assembly of simple parts which cooperate to serve with ease and efficiency.

While I have described the invention along 5 specific lines, various minor changes or refinements may be made therein without departing from its principle, and I reserve the right to employ such changes and refinements as may come within the scope and spirit of the appended 0 claims.

I claim: 1. A fountain pen comprising a barrel having a front end wall formed with a non-circular opening, a pen assembly in the barrel, and means 5 co advance the assembly to project its forepart through said opening, said forepart having a contour similar to the form of the opening to render the assembly non-rotatable in relation to the barrel.

2. A fountain pen comprising a barrel having a front end wall formed with a D-shaped opening, a pen assembly in the barrel, and means to advance the assembly to project its forepart through said opening, said forepart also being D-shaped in cross-section to fit said opening and render the assembly non-rotatable in relation to the barrel.

3. A fountain pen comprising a barrel having a front end wall formed with an opening, a hinged door closing said opening from the inside, a pen-assembly in the barrel, means to advance the assembly to project the pen through said opening when the door is open, and means to swing the door open when the advancing movement of the assembly is initiated.

4. A fountain pen comprising a barrel having a front end wall formed with an opening, a hinged door closing said opening from the inside, a pen-assembly in the barrel, means to advance the assembly to project the pen through said opening when the door is open, and second means actuated by the assembly to swing the door open when the advancing movement of the assembly is initiated.

5. The structure of claim 4, said second means including a hinged lever extended to the door as a prop, a spring to maintain the lever in the engaging position, a tall portion for the lever beyond the hinge, and an element bearing on the tail portion on the advance of the assembly to swing the lever in the disengaging direction to release the door.

6. The structure of claim 4, said second means including a hinged lever extended to the door as a prop, the door being hinged at the bottom and rearwardly tilted when closed, a spring to maintain the lever in the engaging position, a tail portion for the lever beyond the hinge, and an element bearing on the tail portion when the assembly is advanced to swing the lever in the disengaging direction to release the door.

7. The structure of claim 4, said second means comprising a hinged lever extended to the door as a prop, the door being hinged at tle bottom and rearwardly tilted when closed, a rearward spur from the hinged portion of the door, a spring to maintain the lever in the engaging position, a tail portion for the lever beyond the hinge, and an element bearing on the tail portion when the assembly is advanced to swing the lever downwardly to become disengaged from the door and to bear on said spur with the effect of backing the door to a horizontal position, whereby to clear the path for the advance of the assembly.

8. A fountain pen comprising a barrel having a longitudinal opening in its wall, a pen-assembly in the barrel, and means controlled by way of said opening to advance the assembly to project the pen from one end of the barrel and retain the assembly at either end of its travel, said means comprising an external button, a lever secured with one end to said assembly and the other end to said button, the lever being outwardly tensioned to maintain the button in a projected position from the barrel, and other means to lock the button from travel in said opening until the button is depressed at either end of the latter.

9. A fountain pen comprising a barrel having a longitudinal slot in its wall formed with terminal enlarged openings, a pen assembly in the barrel, a control button outside the latter and having a shank passing through one of said openings, a lever connected with one end to said assembly and with the other to the inner end of said shank, a neck between the latter and the button head of a width to clear the slot when the button is moved from its related opening toward the other, said lever being outwardly tensioned to normally lodge the shank as a bar to the related end of the slot, and the button being depressible against the tension of said lever whereby to aline said neck with the slot and permit the button to be pushed from its related opening toward the other, moving said assembly accordingly.

GROVER C. SMITH.

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