Title:
Portable radio receiver
United States Patent 2388567


Abstract:
This invention relates to portable radio receivers, and more particularly to pocket-type receivers having very small dimensions. In the past, pocket-type radio receivers have not been very efficient, due to the difficulties incident to the antenna for such a receiver. In receivers of this...



Inventors:
Patterson Jr., George
Application Number:
US47387143A
Publication Date:
11/06/1945
Filing Date:
01/28/1943
Assignee:
PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORP
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
220/751, 220/756, 220/761, 248/688, 312/7.1, 343/702, 343/842, D14/194
International Classes:
F16M11/10; H01Q1/24
View Patent Images:



Description:

This invention relates to portable radio receivers, and more particularly to pocket-type receivers having very small dimensions.

In the past, pocket-type radio receivers have not been very efficient, due to the difficulties incident to the antenna for such a receiver. In receivers of this type, a loop antenna has been employed in an effort to provide the necessary signal pick-up and efficient operation of the receiver as a whole, but the prior constructions and arrangements have not been entirely satisfactory.

Where the loop antenna is placed within the small receiver housing or casing, it is necessarily in such close proximity to the receiver elements that regeneration and other deleterious effects are encountered which lower the efficiency of the receiver. Moreover, it is desirable that the loop antenna shall have a high Q (ratio of reactance to resistance), and this has been difficult of attainment due to space limitations. In some instances, the loop antenna has been attached to a lid of the casing which may be opened when the receiver is in use, thereby physically removing the loop from the receiver elements and rendering the receiver more efficient. However, a desired object of the pocket-type radio receiver is that it shall be operable efficiently while being carried in a pocket of the user, and the known receivers of this type have failed to realize this object.

One object of the present invention is to provide a portable radio receiver which overcomes the above-mentioned difficulties and which will operate efficiently under all conditions.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pocket-type radio receiver employing an antenna which is external to the receiver casing and is adjustable relative thereto, and which is easily movable to different positions of operation, including its optimum operating position.

A further object of the invention is to provide a receiver of this character in which the antenna structure may be used in various ways as a physical support for the receiver, and the antenna may have its signal pick-up enhanced by contact with various objects. Another object of the invention is to provide a receiver of this type in which the antenna structure normally blends with the receiver casing and normally forms a part of the contour of the casing, thus presenting an attractive appearance. Still another object of the invention is to provide a high Q loop antenna in a device of this character.

Other objects and features of the invention will be apparent hereinafter. In the accompanying drawings: Figure 1 is a perspective view of a portable radio receiver embodying the present invention, with the antenna structure in one of its support positions; Figure 2 is another perspective view of the device looking at the same from the rear; Figure 3 is a side elevational view showing the antenna structure in another position; Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating more clearly the manner in which the antenna structure is retained in its normal closed position; Figure 5 is a sectional view of the loop antenna structure; Figure 6 is a perspective view of a portion of the tubular enclosure of the antenna structure; and Figure 7 is a fragmentary exploded view illustrating a hinge structure which may be used for mounting the antenna structure on the receiver casing.

Referring to Figs. 1 to 3, there is shown a pocket-type radio receiver having a housing or casing I within which the receiver elements are disposed. At the front of the receiver are located the indicating dial 2 and the control knobs 3.

The present invention is not concerned with the receiver per se which may take any desired form. The casing I may be formed of any suitable material. For example, it may be formed of a light weight metal, such as aluminum, or it may be formed of a plastic material.

Briefly, in accordance with the present invention, an antenna structure 4, preferably a loop, is hingedly attached to the casing I by means of hinges 5, and the casing is provided with a peripheral recess 6 in which the loop antenna structure is adapted to seat or nest. As illustrated, the recess 6 preferably extends about the rear peripheral edge portion of the casing I, although the invention contemplates any other desired location of the recess and the associated loop antenna structure. The antenna structure is substantially rigid and conforms in size and shape to the recess 6. The portion of the loop antenna structure which is attached to the casing is permanently seated in a portion of the recess 6 and is rotatable therein so that the loop may be moved to different positions.

Normally, the antenna structure is seated in the recess, as shown in Fig. 4, and is retained in such position by the projecting edge or lip 7. To this end, the recessed portion of the casing I is constructed so as to provide the said retaining lip. In order to move the antenna structure out of the groove, it is necessary to move it forcibly over the lip to some position such as shown in the dot-and-dash representation in Fig. 4. By virtue of the construction of the antenna structure, which will be described later, the antenna housing has sufficient resilience or "give" to permit this movement. Conversely, when it is desired to return the structure to its seated position, it is necessary to force it over the retaining lip 7 until it is seated in the recess.

As illustrated in Figs. 1 to 3, the antenna structure is movable to various positions, in some of which it is adapted to serve as a support for the receiver. When the antenna structure is positioned as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, it is adapted to serve as an easel support for the receiver.

Preferably, the antenna structure is retained in this position by novel means provided in the hinge structures to be described hereinafter. When the antenna structure is disposed in the position illustrated in Fig. 3, it is adapted to serve as a carrying handle or as a suspension support, by means of which the receiver may be hung on a fixed object. The adaptability of the antenna structure for different modes of support of the receiver also has electrical advantages which will be described hereinafter.

Referring to Figs. 5 and 6, the antenna structure preferably comprises a loop constructed as illustrated in these figures, but the invention is not particularly concerned with the details of construction of the loop structure which may take any suitable form. As shown in Figs. 5 and 6, the loop structure illustrated comprises a tubular enclosure or shell 8 and a loop antenna 9 therein.

The shell 8 is formed of insulating material, such as molded plastic, and is preferably formed of hard plastic material such as methyl-methacrylate. This shell is formed of two complementary sections 10 and II which are joined together during the construction of the loop structure, as presently described. At spaced points, the shell sections have complementary ribs 12 and 13, which, when brought together, form apertured supports for the loop 9 and serve to maintain the same in spaced relation to the inner surface of the shell 8, as shown in Fig. 5.

The loop 9 comprises a number of turns of insulated wire, such as copper. By virtue of its construction, the loop antenna has a desirable high Q which is particularly important in this type of radio receiver. The ends of the loop conductor are connected to short leads 15 which extend externally of the loop structure at the recessed portions 16 of the shell 8, the purpose of which will appear presently. Preferably, the shell 8 has heavy ribs 17 at the positions of the leads 15, and openings 18 extend through these ribs and the outer wall of shell 8 to accommodate the lead wires. A suitable cement 19 serves to seal these openings.

In constructing the loop antenna structure as illustrated, the loop 9 is wound on a suitable form so as to have the desired size, shape and number of turns, and the short connecting leads 15 are connected to the ends thereof. Preferably, the turns of the loop are then bound together by the application of a suitable insulating cement. The sections of the shell 8 are formed preferably by molding a plastic such as above mentioned. The wound loop is removed from the form and is placed in one section of the shell with the short leads 15 in proper position and is preferably sealed into place with a suitable cement. These elements are then placed in a dehydrator to remove all moisture. The other section of the shell is then brought into proper position and the entire assembly is placed into a mold and is formed into an integral unit under pressure. The two sections of the shell are cemented together with a suitable cement. During this assembly, the cement 19 is applied to seal the openings 18.

The cement employed for the various purposes mentioned should be a low loss cement, such as any polystyrene base binder.

When the loop antenna structure is completed, the loop proper is hermetically sealed within the shell 8 so that no moisture can enter the same. The supporting ribs within the shell serve to stabilize the loop and prevent contact thereof with the inner wall of the shell. These ribs also form additional sealing junctions for the shell sections.

By reason of the above construction, the high Q of the loop is maintained.

Referring now to Fig. 7, there is illustrated one of the hinge arrangements, both of which are similar in construction. A split sleeve comprising complemental metallic members 20 and 21 embraces the recessed or reduced portion 16 of the shell 8. Member 21 has a recess 22 to accommodate a projection 23 on the shell 8, thus locking member 21 in fixed position relative to the loop structure. The sleeve sections 20 and 21 have complemental recesses 24 and 25 which form an aperture into which the short connecting lead 15 extends. When the sleeve sections are brought into engagement with the loop structure, a drop of solder is placed in the said aperture to provide a good electrical connection between the loop 9 and the metallic sleeve. The main portion of each sleeve member corresponds in thickness to the depth of the recess 16 so as to form a smooth contour with the surfaces of the shell 8. The sleeve sections 20 and 21 also have complemental flanges 26 and 27 which cooperatively form a circular flange adapted to seat in a relatively deep recess or slot 28 in the receiver casing I. A metallic clamp or strap 29 embraces the as. sembled sleeve and is secured to the casing I by means of suitable screws 30, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. This clamp member serves to retain the parts in assembled relation and permits rotation of the loop structure and associated sleeve during adjustment of the loop. The flange on the assembled sleeve and the associated recess 28 permit rotation of the loop structure while preventing lateral movement thereof.

In order to retain the structure in the easel position of Figs. 1 and 2, the sleeve section 21 is provided with a projecting detent 31 and the clamp member 29 is provided with a corresponding internal recess 32, and these elements are arranged in such positions that they come into engagement when the antenna is in a predetermined easel position. If desired, it will be evident that a similar arrangement could be employed to positively maintain the loop in other positions, for example, the fully extended position. The electrical connection of the loop conductor 9 to the receiver elements within the casing I is preferably effected by means of a connection (not visible) within the casing to one of the screws 30 or directly to the clamp member 29. Since member 29 is in firm engagement with the rotatable sleeve 20--21 and the latter is electrically connected to the loop conductor, the member 29 is itself electrically connected to the loop conductor, as are the screws 30 engaging said member. Alternatively, the connection to the receiver elements within the casing I may be effected by means of a pigtail connection to the sleeve through a suitable opening in casing I.

Thus, the hinge structure illustrated not only provides a hinged mounting of the antenna structure on the receiver casing, but also constitutes an electrical connection between the antenna and the receiver elements within the casing. This hinge structure merely represents a preferred form and is not intended to place any limitation upon the invention which contemplates the provision of any suitable hinge arrangement which accomplishes the desired ends.

For the purpose of illustration, it is assumed that the receiver casing is formed of insulating 1 material. If it is formed of metal, it will be necessary to insulate the hinge parts to prevent short-circuiting the loop.

Returning to the advantages and usage of the complete radio receiver, it will be seen that the invention provides a novelly arranged efficient antenna structure which, in its position of rest, blends with the exterior of the receiver casing and completes the contour of a peripheral edge portion thereof, and which is readily movable to various positions of operation. With the antenna structure in its position for most efficient reception, as shown in Fig. 3, it may be used as a carrying handle, or the device may be carried in a pocket of the user with the antenna structure against the user's body. In either case, the capacity between the user's body and the antenna results in an electrostatic signal pick-up in addition to the electromagnetic pick-up of the antenna, thus enhancing the signal pick-up as a whole. While slight detuning of the antenna may result from the user's body capacity, the additional pick-up more than compensates for this.

With the antenna structure in the same position, it may be used as a hanger to hang the radio receiver on objects such as electric lighting fixtures, telephones, etc., and, since such devices are conductive to radio frequency energy, the signal pick-up is increased by electrostatic coupling of the antenna therewith.

When the antenna structure is used as an easel support, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the receiver may be placed on a table or other object with the speaker directed toward the listener. As the sound reproduction of a small receiver for the most part comprises the frequencies in the higher audio range and these frequencies are highly directional, this method of using the receiver gives a higher ratio of desired sound to undesired external interferences, such as room noises, etc.

Thus, it will be seen that the invention provides a novel portable receiver which is particularly adapted to the field of extremely small receivers of the pocket type and which has the various features and advantages hereinbefore mentioned. It will be understood, of course, that the invention is not limited to the specific embodiment illustrated and described herein, but is capable of various other embodiments and modifications within the scope of the appended claims.

For example, it will be clear that the use of a loop type antenna, as shown and described, is preferable, but increased efficiency and convenience will also result if other forms of antennae are arranged and mounted, in accordance with the present invention.

I claim: 1. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a peripheral recess, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess but being movable to various positions, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

2. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, o said casing having a recess in a peripheral edge portion thereof, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess, said antenna structure substantially filling said recess and blending with the adjacent 5 surfaces of the casing when disposed in the recess, and being movable to various positions, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

3. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a peripheral recess, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess but being movable to various positions, the recessed portion of the casing and the antenna structure being cooperatively constructed and arranged to retain the antenna structure in said recess but permitting removal of the antenna structure from the recess, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

4. A portable radio receiver, comprising a hous3 ing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a peripheral recess, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess but being movable to various positions, the recessed portion of the casing having a retainig edge or lip over which the antenna structure must be forced and which serves to retain the antenna structure in said recess, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

5. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a recess in a peripheral portion thereof, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess, said antenna structure substantially filling said recess and blending with the adjacent surfaces of the casing when disposed in the recess, and being movable to various positions, the recessed portion of the casing and the antenna structure being cooperatively constructed and arranged to retain the antenna structure in said recess but permitting removal of the antenna structure from the recess, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

6. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a recess in a peripheral portion thereof, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess, said antenna structure substantially filing said recess and blending with the adjacent surfaces of the casing when disposed in the recess, and being movable to various positions, the recessed portion of the casing having a retaining edge or lip over which the antenna structure must be forced and which serves to retain the antenna structure in said recess, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

7. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a recess of curved cross-sectional shape extending about a peripheral portion of the casing, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess, said antenna structure being of circular cross-sectional shape substantially filling said recess and blending with the adjacent surfaces of the casing when disposed in the recess, and being movable to various positions, the recessed portion of the casing having a retaining edge or lip over which the antenna structure must be forced and which serves to retain the antenna structure in said recess, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

8. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a peripheral recess, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess but being movable to different positions in which it may serve either as an easel support or as a suspension support for the receiver, means for retaining said antenna structure in one of said different positions, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

9. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a recess in a peripheral edge portion thereof, an antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally seated in said recess, said antenna structure substantially filling said recess and blending with the adjacent 6 surfaces of the casing when disposed in the recess, and being movable to different positions in which it may serve either as an easel support or as a suspension support for the receiver, means for retaining said antenna structure in one of said different positions, and means for electrically connecting the antenna to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

10. A portable radio receiver, comprising a housing or casing containing the receiver elements, said casing having a peripheral recess, a loop antenna structure hingedly attached to said casing and normally disposed in said recess but being movable to various positions, said antenna structure including a tubular enclosure and a loop conductor therein, and means for electrically connecting said loop conductor to the receiver elements within the casing while permitting movement of the antenna structure.

11. A portable radio receiver, comprising a small casing containing the receiver elements and having front and rear walls or faces, said casing having a recess extending about its rear peripheral edge portion surrounding the rear face, an antenna structure conforming in size and shape to said recess so as to be seatable therein, and means hingedly securing said antenna structure to said casing along one of the rear edges of the casing, whereby the antenna structure is mov85 able to various positions and is adapted to serve as a support for the receiver.

GEORGE PATTERSON, Ja.