Title:
Stereoscopic television apparatus
United States Patent 2388170


Abstract:
My invention relates to stereoscopic television apparatus. An object of my invention is to provide a new and improved stereoscopic television apparatus whereby a plurality of people can simultaneously and with equal facility view an'object which has been transmitted by stereoscopic television....



Inventors:
Thelma, Mccollum
Application Number:
US48315543A
Publication Date:
10/30/1945
Filing Date:
04/15/1943
Assignee:
Thelma, Mccollum
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
359/466, 359/477
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Description:

My invention relates to stereoscopic television apparatus.

An object of my invention is to provide a new and improved stereoscopic television apparatus whereby a plurality of people can simultaneously and with equal facility view an'object which has been transmitted by stereoscopic television.

Another object of my invention is to provide a new and improved stereoscopic television apparatus which is simpler, cheaper, more efficient and more convenient than those heretofore known.

Another object of my invention is to provide a new and improved stereoscopic television apparatus wherein the image creating mechanism is mounted in a spectacle frame.

Other objects and advantages will become apparatus as the description proceeds.

In the drawing: Fig. 1 is a partly diagrammatic view of the receiving apparatus of my invention; Fig. 2 is a transverse, sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1; and Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view showing the sending apparatus and its positional relationship to an object to be televised.

In Fig. 3, I have indicated a pair of television cameras 10 and 12 as being focused on an object 14 to be televised. The object 14 is alternately viewed by the cameras 10 and 12 and these cam- 3 eras are connected to a conventional transmitter 16 through an electronic switching device 18 in such fashion that the switching device feeds to the transmitter images alternately :taken from the two cameras. This switching device also i sends a synchronizing .impulse which is broadcast by the transmitter. The transmitter 16 is shown. as being provided with a conventional broadcast aerial 20.

The waves broadcast from the aerial 20 of the 4 transmitter 16 are picked up by the aerial 22 of a receiver 24 which passes the received signal to an electronic switching device 26 which separates the two separate images signals under the control of the synchronizing impulse from the trans- 4 mitter. The separate image signals are then passed through a flexible cable containing wires 28 and 30 leading to two small cathode ray tubes 32 and 34 which are supported in a spectacle frame indicated generally by reference charac- a ter 36.

The frame 3( is illustrated as comprising a plastic subframe 38 having a bridge or nosepiece 40 and mounting a pair of convex magnifying lenses 42 and 44:' Bows 46 and 48 are pivotally 51 attached to the ends of the subframe 38 and are adapted to have their curved ends positioned back of the spectator's ears to prevent the frame from slipping off of his nose and accurately to position the lenses 42 and 44 in front of his eyes. The subframe 38 has a pair of forward extensions 50 and 52 to which are attached the legs 54 and 56 of a second subframe 58, illustrated as being composed of sheet metal strips, although it may be made of any other suitable material. The subframe 58 has spring fingers 60 which support and hold the cathode ray tubes in axial alignment with the magnifying lenses 42 and 44. The subframes are adjustably connected by screws 55 and 57 passing through slots in legs 54 and 56 whereby the distance between the lenses and tubes may be varied.

A feature of my invention lies in the fact that the cathode ray tubes 32 and 34 may be extremely small, that is, approximately one inch in diameter. Such tubes are relatively inexpensive and are light in weight so that they can be readily mounted in a spectacle frame as shown in the drawing. The lenses 42 and 44 may be of inexS1 pensive construction. The arrangement of the cathode ray tubes and the convex magnifying lenses is such that only one cathode ray tube is seen with each eye and it is unnecessary to provide a partition between the two tubes to prevent 10 each eye from seeing both tubes.

Where the viewing spectacles are to be used by a person who ordinarily wears glasses, the frame 36 will ordinarily be so designed that it can be placed on the spectator's nose beyond but .5 in alignment with his vision correcting glasses.

If desired, however, the magnifying lenses 42 and 44 can be ground to provide both the necessary magnification and vision correction' and under these conditions the usual eye glasses will 0 be removed before the frame 36 is positioned on the face.

My novel spectacle frame viewing apparatus is simple and inexpensive and insures the most perfect positional relationship between the wearer's 5 eyes and the images being viewed. Furthermore Sit permits the spectator to recline in a comfortable chair and to view the object being televised without sitting in. some certain position relative to a screen or other fixed surface upon which 0 the images are shown. My invention also has the further advantage that several viewing spectacles may be connected in parallel to the same switch device 26. In Fig. 1 of the drawing, I have indicated this by showing additional cables 5 62 and 64 leading to other spectacle receivers which are not shown but which may be identical with that shown in Fig. 1.

While I have illustrated and described in detail only a single embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that my invention may assume numerous other forms and that my invention includes all variations and modifications falling within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim: .

1. Stereoscopic television apparatus of the class described, comprising a spectacle frame, a pair of magnifying lenses mounted in said frame, and a pair of image creating tubes mounted in said frame in alignment with said lenses.

2. Stereoscopic television apparatus of the class described, comprising a first subframe, including a nose support and magnifying lenses mounted therein on opposite sides of said support, a second subframe attached to said first subframe, a pair of small cathode ray tubes resiliently mounted in said second subframe and bows pivotally attached to one of said subframes.

3. Apparatus of the class described, comprising a plastic frame and having a nosepiece, lenses mounted therein on opposite sides of said nosepiece, bows attached to said plastic frame, a second frame attached to said plastic frame, image forming tubes mounted in said second frame, each of said tubes being in alignment with one of said lenses, and resilient means for supporting said tubes in said second frame.

4. Apparatus of the class described, comprising a plastic frame and having a nosepiece, lenses mounted therein on opposite sides of said nosepiece, bows attached to said plastic frame, a second frame attached to said plastic frame, image forming tubes mounted in said second frame, each of said tubes being in alignment with one of said lenses, and means for varying the distance between said frames.

O2 HENRY J. DE N. McCOLLUM.